13

Yes, that's not only appropriate, but -- next to replication -- a main purpose of publishing data. Not being able to build on published data would greatly limit the accumulation of knowledge and lead to wasteful duplication of data collection efforts. Of course you must cite the data source. Perhaps you should even acknowledge its authors beyond this ...


13

As you may already be aware, you generally have the option of noting who shouldn't be reached out to be a reviewer when submitting a manuscript for consideration of publication. If the manuscript management service doesn't have an option, then yes, you can mention it in the cover letter or directly to the managing editorial team. It's generally fine and ...


8

Note: I am assuming when you say "advisor and co-authors", you mean something like "advisor and external co-authors", and that the full list of authors is you, you advisor, and your external co-authors. If your advisor is not an author on the paper, then that is a different situation, as noted by Arno. This is a fairly common type of ...


6

I came across this question today, and I want to briefly share one of my experiences. It is an opposite to the answer of @aeismail, and to the final paragraph of @PeteL.Clark's answer: Once (c.2016), I submitted a paper to a specialist, but pretty mainstream, mathematics journal, and after a round of revisions I got an email from the handling editor saying, ...


6

First, everyone makes mistakes. The people that you fear are judging you also make mistakes. It is part of the human condition. It is sad that when you put a paper on arXiv that those finding errors don't contact you so that you can fix them. It would be better if they did, but that might also make you sad. The best solution, actually, is to find some other ...


5

The journal isn't going to know about it and publish it exactly as you wrote it. If you want it fixed, you will need to tell them about it. At the same time, the right approach is to just not worry about it. It is clear to everyone that "University of X" and "X University" are the same, in particular for universities in countries in which ...


4

Yes, check Journal Citation Reports (JCR), published by the company that calculates impact factors (Clarivate). Unfortunately, this is not a free service. Here's the historical impact factor of Nature.


3

If I submit multiple papers (one for each area/experiment) how can I ensure they all get published together? You cannot "ensure" it. You can ask the editor in your cover letter to publish the papers together. The editor will decide if it is appropriate. The premise I should NOT include several different types of experiments covering multiple ...


3

My diagnosis is that he is overworked. The solution would be to drop half of you and send you to other advisors. I doubt that he is just lazy if he is "well respected" in the field. I doubt that this is an uncommon situation at high level universities with top advisors and active students. It isn't unethical if he is being diligent even if he is &...


2

It is probably because the publisher has not registered the DOI with Crossref. See https://www.crossref.org/services/content-registration/. You can contact the publisher and request them to do this


2

As Prof. Santa Claus writes in a comment, you can write a series of papers with titles "Blah blah blah: Part I", "Blah blah blah: Part II", and so on. It's then obvious to the editors of the journal that they should be published together. Note you'll have to send them all to the same journal, for obvious reasons, and be sure to say they ...


2

Yes, it will help as it is a positive indicator of research interest and success. But it is impossible to say whether you have a chance or not. Only by going through the application process can you learn that. Some places can be pretty sophisticated about interpreting "bad" grades for the thesis. If top marks are rare at your institution, that may ...


2

It will probably have only a minimal impact, if any. But the SoP is not the place for it. Put it in the CV. For more on the SoP and what to write there, see this canonical answer about admissions in the US


1

Misconduct implies a deliberate action. I don't think that is likely; what would he have to gain? Instead, it sounds like he has too much to do. That is no fun for you, but also no fun for him. So he does not have to be the enemy. Solving this issue would make work more enjoyable for all. This is obviously a very delicate discussion: not many bosses would ...


1

You need to chill out. Rejection of papers is a normal part of research work, and something that academics at all levels experience regularly. Making mistakes in published work is also something that unfortunately happens occasionally; researchers are not infallible, and neither are peer-reviewers. When you find a mistake in your published work (or when ...


1

(Note: This answer was posted when the question did not yet specify that the supervisor was a coauthor, too.) Is your supervisor also a coauthor of this paper? If yes, then following Andrew's suggestion to facilate a direct exchange between your supervisor and the other coauthors is spot-on. If your supervisor is not a coauthor for the paper, then their ...


1

Yes, but you make things very difficult for yourself if you do not stick to that nom de plume for the remainder of your career. And to get credit, your CV and perhaps some other stuff like your email byline, would have to state something along the lines of, professionally known as Prullaria Fantasticus. Which might strike some people as odd and thus could ...


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