72

Keep it short and sweet: Dear [her name], Thanks for the reminder about our project. I thought about it some more, and for personal reasons I won’t be able to continue with the work. Since you have all the data I suggest that you pursue publication by yourself or with other collaborators. And, if it matters, I do not care very much about the issue of ...


16

"I am afraid that, despite trying, with my new job and duties it has become increasingly difficult to allocate time for writing the paper. I have tried to give the paper my best shot, but it has taken more time than expected, and unfortunately my resources have now run out. I am afraid it is not realistic for me to complete the paper and I am forced to ...


13

How about just...never talking to her again? Just stop e-mailing her back. You don't owe her a thing. You sent a reasonable e-mail to her explaining your situation. Then she replied and said that you owe her. What wonderful nonsense! She needs a reality check. That is not the way things work. She is your former supervisor. I think that you should block her e-...


9

It sounds like you need to consider three distinct issues: Trade secrets / copyright: Is the data truly yours to publish? I am not a lawyer, but depending on location, type of employment and contracts / NDAs you may have signed, the simple fact that you took the readings and acquired the data might not make you legal copyright holder. What you may need - ...


6

Email your supervisor: Ask them whether they'd like to co-author a paper derived from your thesis. Move forwards from there. You needn't write the paper before getting your supervisors input. You should ask for guidance whilst writing the paper. I have the option to publish it without naming my supervisor or the organization. Actually, you don't. ...


5

It might be important to know what such a "vendetta" might look like. Will you depend on your advisor in the future as a character reference for your next job? Or do you fear an actual, physical vendetta (hopefully not)? If all you fear is burning bridges and getting one last angry "I'm very disappointed in you, after all I've done for you&...


2

The phrasing in your question suggests that you want an advisor with the most cachet in the field, so that your results (which you do not have yet) will have the most visibility. That would suggest waiting for the spring. If so, yes do the white paper and wait. But often what you need an advisor for is advice — that is, help and guidance doing the actual ...


2

Is it my responsibility as an undergrad student to figure out if my thesis is affordable? Usually, no. This is an example of where your faculty advisor should help you. Do take a few minutes to research costs before discussing it with your advisor. There might be exceptions if, based on your area of study, you were expected to know about costs already.


2

I believe that human error is the most common reason for inaccuracy in peer-reviewed scientific articles, but I must respectfully add another reason: academic politics. I served as a peer reviewer for over 20 years. I typically spent 10-20 hours on each review, because informational integrity is the bedrock of scientific advancement. The longer I served as a ...


1

It is too early for you to commit to a final field of study. It is good that you have a lot of interests and the opportunity to learn some things about many of them. Studying math at a liberal arts college, as I did, or at place that otherwise permits a broad education is a good way to build up a body of interests, any of which you might later decide to ...


1

Beside the other good suggestions, you might want to be a co-author if she, or someone else on her behalf, takes the burden of writing the paper by developing the research a bit further. As that happens, you probably ought to be a co-author. So you could make it clear that you don't have time to write the paper (as much as she hasn't got that) but could help ...


1

The reviewer is not responsible for the content of an article. He gives his opinion on the novelty and scientific rigour, and recommends acceptance or rejection based upon that opinion. He has the freedom to recommend improvements, and is expected to point out whatever appears to be erroneous to him. The author must not lie (that would create a liability on ...


1

Was the competition ranking based on a blinded test set? If not, the none of the results of the competition are very strong evidence. If yes, unless there was gross misconduct* the blinding by the competition provides strong evidence in favor of the best ranked result. Thus, cite the best result with the publication about the competition. If you are ...


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