36

Speaking from a field where author lists are always alphabetical: This will do you good in the long run! If you follow this convention, you will never have to argue over authorship order - take a look at the amount of questions on this site dealing with exactly this question, and be thrilled that you have the option to simply exclude that from your life. ...


27

Actually, you should let A know that you and the others have been working on the problem and propose that you merge into one group. If B and C haven't been productive on it, then you might want to discuss it with them first. It might be that one or both of them isn't ready for a more intensive collaboration. You can, jointly, be honest with A that your ...


23

In the first instance, I recommend talking to the professor and respectfully asking the reason why they changed the author ordering. However, unfortunately it is completely conventional in some fields to always list authors alphabetically, meaning that if your name is at the end of the alphabet you're unlikely to ever have a first author paper (note that if ...


19

As someone who has served as referee for math textbook proposals for reputed academic publishers, I can tell you that if your proposal were sent to me, I could not care less about whether you have a degree or what your title is. I would care about the content of your proposal and whether it convinced me that you can write a high quality, correct, and ...


19

Talk to the other collaborators who probably agree with you, and then take a unified front to tell him that holding several collaborators hostage is not ok. Additionally, if part of his new publication uses a jointly developed idea which he intends to publish alone while blocking your joint work (that should be in the references of his planned solo paper), ...


17

I'd recommend not trying to submit a paper to a journal without guidance from a more experienced academic. That academic doesn't have to be a professor; anyone with more experience with the field than you should be good. You've contacted the professor, which is a great start. If they don't reply, you can/should also talk to your teachers. Since you're fresh ...


11

Whether Springer or any other publisher wants to publish any given book is entirely up to them. I'm sure that plenty of books are published by people without degrees. But note that first you need to attract an "acquisitions editor" who makes a preliminary determination whether it is worth their time to work with you. Convince them that you have the ...


11

Anyone can publish a paper, regardless of age or affiliation, provided that it meets the (rather high) standards of a journal. The standards will include things like understandable writing, but more important is whether the paper solves an "interesting" question in a "novel" way. "Interesting" can mean new and important, or ...


7

I had a similar experience a very long time ago: I was working with what would be my Ph.D. advisor's group and this work and I did a long and involved calculation which was the major part of a paper. After I handed in the results and helped write up the paper I found out that my name was nowhere in the paper, and only got a thanks in the aknowledgement. I ...


7

A particularly challenging aspect of writing a paper is the introduction. At least in my field of research, I expect this to contain a reasonable overview of related work. Context ist very important to appreciate the value of a paper. The standard is that this needs to be provided by the author, not by the reader. This was a major challenge for me for many ...


6

Congratulations on finding the proof! I have looked into your comments and also your MSE post. Here are some remarks: you are mis-attributing the field of your result. It is not 'related to algebra'; modern algebra studies general, abstract features of structures. Neither is it related to operator theory as your tag suggests. If I were to name a field, it ...


6

When a journal is set up on ScholarOne, one piece of information they provide is an EO email address. When you filled out the form, ScholarOne sent the email to that address "on behalf of" you. There is no direct way for you to view this correspondence through the system. You could contact the EO office again, and ask for a copy to be forwarded to ...


6

As others have noted there are some fields (and subfields) where alphabetical ordering is the standard and everyone understands, expects, and respects that. A paper with a different ordering will stand out in some way. But the solution in such a situation is to provide a short section in the paper itself, detailing the main contributions of each author. For ...


5

Here are some ideas from a physics perspective. We often have to deal with long equations. If you have the occasional over-long equation, then sparing use of the two-column environment or slightly smaller font size can be the good choices. (Assuming the journal accepts it.) Suppressing meaningful indices like this can be OK if they are repeated, but if the ...


4

Ask the group if you can be the "corresponding author" In most disciplines, the corresponding author is either the lead author who did most of the writing/work or the PI on the project. They handle the submission and are in direct contact with the journal. If you are marked as the corresponding author on the publication, it will be assumed that you ...


3

Is he the primary contributor of this paper or the idea? If he was the sole contributor of that specific idea, he has the right to withdraw from the paper with his idea. Your work is still publishable. If he soon writes a new paper partly based on his idea, you should cite his working paper as the source of idea. If no working paper comes out before your ...


3

Will lacking a degree in mathematics or physics prevent my book from being published? It won't outright prevent your book from being published, but it will be a disadvantage. This stems from two things: Without a degree, unless you can demonstrate exceptional achievement, you are less of an authority. Without a degree, like it or not, your books will ...


3

Congratulations! Even if your paper contains errors, the mere experience of writing it and submitting it for evaluation by others is hugely valuable and shows superb skill and dedication from you! Please don't stop! I'm not clear if this is something you have already written, or is still unfinished. I am not a published researcher, but I have many friends ...


3

I was in your same position in high-school, and not to come off as discouraging, but the results you have most likely do not settle the “famous” open problem you’re interested in. In high-school, I believed I had proved P=NP by coming up with an algorithm that solved an NP-Hard problem. I even typed the solution and emailed it to a few Professors who, ...


3

TIAA-CREF has published an excellent article regarding The Changing Faculty Workforce Models by Adrianna Kezar of the University of Southern California. and can be found at the following URL: www.tiaa-crefinstitute.org In a nutshell, the document details changes in academia resulting from several external influences that have impacted the traditional faculty ...


3

There are no open data* about editorial boards yet. Thus, research articles that analyze the composition of journals' editorial boards unfortunately collect their data manually. For instance, a paper in 2016 writes at p. 4: We began with a collection of 605 abbreviated titles of journals [...]. Crowdworkers from Amazon Mechanical Turk then expanded those ...


1

It would depend on who made the "recommendation". If it was a reviewer, then, no, it doesn't imply acceptance. It makes it more likely, but not assured. An editor can, and sometimes does, reject a paper even with positive recommendations. That might be for business or space reasons, perhaps. I think the "future steps" is to wait for a ...


1

First, use citation to avoid any charge of plagiarism/stealing. This is true for plots as well as for quoted words. Second, it would depend on how much of the work you would be including. If you want to include all or most of the plots in the original you would be on shaky ground just as if you over-quoted the article even with citation. Third, there might ...


1

This is very field dependent, and also can depend a lot on sub-fields within a field. I don't know what your (sub)field is, but since you say the justification is that "that's the convention they are beginning to follow", I am guessing it is not universal in your sub-field. If that is the case then you are right to be upset. This will harm you as a ...


1

Please check if the journal actually has a detailing section of the contributions (i think in nature or science this was in the end of the paper) Check the Rules of the Journal, could be that they ask for alphabetical order


1

Even if the result is not new, if your proof is short (and, by definition, does not require more than what a high-schooler knows), then it might be possible to publish in say American Math. Monthly, or similar. They accept short, nice proofs.


1

It depends what you mean by "publishing". If you want to make it publicly available, and touch as much people as possible with your book, publishing it by Springer is not always the best way to go. As a personal experience, I'm writing a math book while having no affiliation. The "originality" is to be completely free (the LaTeX sources ...


1

You were completely wrong in thinking it was unethical to co-author a paper you had no part in writing, or that the other person did anything wrong. Quite the contrary. Contributions to papers may take very different form; one can merit a co-authorship without writing a word if one contributed essential ideas. As a famous example, Adelman of the RSA code ...


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