Hot answers tagged

69

If you have gathered some information from a YouTube video, and if there is no better source for it; then the YouTube video is what you should cite. Now whether a YouTube video is a reliable source or not depends on a lot of details. If, for example, the YouTube video is a recording of a reputable academic giving a scientific talk, then you can treat it with ...


18

First and foremost, it's your thesis and it's primary your duty to ensure that it's not plagiarised. To avoid plagiarism, don't paraphrase: write the thesis with your own words. Then, depending on the university rules, the supervisor might also have the duty to check for plagiarism your thesis (e.g. through a plagiarism checker software), and in that case ...


16

If you’re going to use the fact in your academic writing, then yes, you have to cite it. The real question is, is the source credible enough that it would be acceptable for you to trust that the fact it claims is a true one? The answer to that does not depend on the fact that the source is a YouTube video: some YouTube videos (say, of a lecture by a Nobel ...


12

You still need to avoid a charge of plagiarism. If the information is "common knowledge" then you don't need a citation, but otherwise it needs to be attributed to a source. Perhaps the YouTube video had a presenter or something that identifies where the information comes from. But, as a last resort, credit the video along with a date that you ...


12

What kind of graduate program are you trying to get into? In pure mathematics and many parts of applied mathematics and theoretical computer science, no one cares about author order, and the convention is that authors are listed alphabetically. So, I’m not entirely sure, but I think you may have some misconceptions about the reasons for your advisor’s ...


10

The following is obviously an educated guess, so you have to be the judge whether it fits all the information you have: Your examiners found something of serious concern in your thesis. This could be potential plagiarism, data manipulation, etc. Otherwise they wouldn’t go through such extreme measures and wouldn’t have cancelled the defence already. The ...


6

On several occasions, I have been a member of an academic jury at a Portuguese university. In Portuguese, the structure is usually the following: Presidente do júri, the "president of the jury" who presides to the dissertation. His participation varies between symbolic to active — he can make 1 or 2 questions or comments, if he so desires, or just ...


5

After some decades of naively thinking that the point of an exam was the exam itself ... I've finally realized that the largest point is to give students a motivation to study/review/think. So the point is that the student knows, in advance, that questions will be asked. And that not being able to respond will be, at least, an embarrassment. So the student ...


5

I'd say neither. You shouldn't really be "using sentences" out of sources you include in a literature review, you should be writing everything in your own words and then citing for where you got the concepts and ideas. You don't just substitute words around and rearrange a sentence and then tack on a citation - that's still not your own writing. ...


4

I don't have a truly similar situation, but it seems that something has come up. Something that needs to be dealt with seriously. One case I know of was parallel work leading to two very similar doctoral theses, presented simultaneously, answering an important question. The plagiarism question naturally arises. In this case it was worked out satisfactorily ...


4

Often there will be a committee, and not just one professor asking questions. In some institutions, any faculty member can attend and ask questions. The principal reason is to be sure you do understand the concepts you have presented, which has the added effect of reassuring them that you actually did write the thesis. They may also probe for broader, more ...


3

You can cite Youtube videos, just include some explanation. The first reference of this PRL article about rigid-body rotations is a Youtube video so it's certainly been done before in a serious scientific article.


3

Your PhD degree certificate itself will probably give the formal definition of your field. For example, mine says PhD in cosmology. But, if I was talking to someone who didn't know much about the different areas of physics, I might just say I did my PhD in physics. If I was talking to a cosmologist, I'd say I worked on dark energy, and specifically testing ...


2

Do not spend extra months to produce new results on this dead horse. It looks to me you undertook an ambitious thesis (very high risk, moderately high reward) ... and it turned out unsuccesful. However, you are not the one to blame: there is a thesis advisor exactly to avoid these dead-ends. Do not blame yourself, your advisor should have know better. ...


2

Research papers need not contain a comprehensive review of all of the literature plausibly related to their content - it's neither possible nor desirable. While you should avoid "through citations" where you cite Jones et al for saying "Baker et al found", it's perfectly reasonable to cite review articles for their overall conclusions and ...


2

To avoid both plagiarism and copyright issues you can quote short passages and cite the original. You can also paraphrase and cite. For long passages you have to paraphrase and cite (avoiding copyright issues). But for such short passages, just quote. Which of your versions is "better" depends on more than you can say here, so I won't suggest more. ...


1

It is clear and complete, so should be fine, subject to the advice of your advisor (for a thesis). The exception would be if you need to make specific something you write and how it relates to a specific paragraph. Even then, you could cite the entire section and cite again any quotes you need from the document. But, check with your advisor. The dual ...


1

It could be a good experience, as you are more independent, and thus has to take more responsibility. However, as the advisor is less familiar with the field, it is crucial that you do a thorough literature review first, to ensure that the problem you are trying to solve has not already been solved. Also, note that after a PhD, you are very likely (expected, ...


1

You are worried about why they did not explain the matter in the email. Actually, this is for your advantage. If there is a problem and if they explain it in the email, that makes the problem official. If they haven't explained in the email, that means they haven't made up their mind about how to deal with the problem yet. I sense compassion, and opportunity ...


1

You don't need to cite your "data" every time you mention it Assuming it is okay to identify the institutions in your study, I would recommend that you cite the published reports and other public works from these organisations (using standard citations), but for the remaining material you can consider this as part of your "data" and you ...


1

Just as you wouldn't cite Wikipedia directly, you also shouldn't cite YouTube directly. The issue is that both sites present user-generated content immediately, with no peer review or fact checking process (Wikipedia arguably can have these features after the fact via community editors, but it's difficult to know when/if information has been verified). ...


1

There could be many reasons as to why your advisor wants to be listed as the first author, i.e. for reasons of funding. There may also be certain conventions to consider here, e.g. that a prof. is expected to be listed as the main author, or that alphabetical order is used generally. The bottom line of what I am trying to say is that there may be very good ...


1

I can't know what the practice is at your particular university, but that kind of public presentation is common. Other faculty and students may be invited, and may come. The forum gives the student a chance to explain to the audience what they wrote about, what they learned, and why it's important and interesting. Unless there is some doubt about the ...


1

In case you write your thesis with LaTeX, you may comfortably include external .pdf files (e.g., the .pdf of the publisher's version of your publication, preprints, etc.) with the usepackage pdfpages. From there, you may reference them easily, e.g., in the table of contents, because if not set to fitpaper the outer page counting of your thesis still will be ...


1

Try and arm yourself with arguments how your topic would be beneficial for the group. Perhaps you could say that working on a certain topic would produce results and papers a lot faster than the Prof's prefered topic and hence could potentially lead to a larger number of and higher quality publications. Also listen to what the professor is saying too. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible