Hot answers tagged

37

Things like that happen. (Also, as mentioned in the comments, you might be wrong on the reason of their behaviour.) Close mentoring Assign meetings, say, weekly. Make it very clear, you want to see some progress each meeting. Steer the student in the right direction in each meeting. You'd need to define their topic, the extent of work, etc. early on. No ...


33

Use "we" when referring to something you did as a team, and use "I" when referring to something that you did by yourself. That is what these words are for. Using "we" and "I" consistently in this way helps to make clear what your contributions were, and this is often exactly what the jury wants to find out during your ...


23

The convention in pure math is to list authors in alphabetical order. Since this is generally known inside pure math, readers will not draw any conclusions from the author order about the relative importance of contributions. In fact, my impression is that most pure mathematicians prefer to avoid discussion of relative importance of contributions altogether, ...


19

This brings to mind the old chestnut about how you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink. First, get clarity on what your duties and expectations as an advisor are. You're a student yourself; ask someone who coordinates the undergraduate thesis program for advice. I'm certain you're not the first undergraduate supervisor to deal with this....


17

That's a matter of opinion. If it's your official thesis defense presentation, you're representing your work, so it would be fine to use "I". But others may prefer to stick with the common "we". There is no 'correct' answer here. You should do what you feel comfortable with.


10

I suggest you: Clarify with your advisor exactly what is expected of you as a supervisor. Clarify (again with your advisor) what is expected of the BSc student working on this project. Communicate with your advisor about the difficulties you are having with this student. I suggest framing it as "this student seems underprepared for successfully ...


8

Assuming you really do not want to work with them and not even check them out if they are suitable candidates, the response is simply: "I do not currently have available slots for grad students." Not funding, but "slots". It means time, nerves, energy, whatever else could come into their mind. If they have no funding, you say you have no ...


8

"What should I do? I don't want to appear pretentious, or rude in front of my supervisor, but I don't think it's fair for me either. In case it's relevant my field of research is pure math." My recommendation is to accept that alphabetical authorship is the ubiquitous convention not only in pure math but also in most areas of math and computer ...


6

Let me suggest that in pure mathematics the conventions are that a student is usually permitted/encouraged to write sole author papers. And for properly done joint work, the convention is to use alphabetical order for authors. Mathematicians will understand this though people in other fields might not. But, you can also include a short "contributions&...


5

The goal of a master's degree is (among others) learning the first steps of doing research. Most master students are not great at that yet. That's what your advisor is for. They are the persons that can help you to become a better researcher, on how to structure your thesis, on what your priorities should be, how to approach people who might be experts in ...


4

In fields where alphabetic ordering is the norm, non-alphabetic ordering is sometimes used for indicating that the first author contributed much more. (See for example https://arxiv.org/abs/hep-th/0510032). Asking to be first author would seem reasonable in your case. This said, author ordering is a rather coarse way of indicating who did what. Some journals ...


4

There is no rule you have to pick one exclusively. I would not bat an eye at someone using "we" for the collaborative sections and "I" at their sections. Especially for a thesis presentation, everyone knows you and who your group is.


3

If you don’t have at least one research problem, you can’t write a plan. That’s the core of your difficulty (based on your comment in which you explained that you don’t have a research problem). A plan is the articulation of what your objectives are and how you think you might achieve them. But you don’t actually have any concrete objectives. So the idea of ...


3

I agree with the options the other answers present, and that in the end it is up to you to decide what to do, keeping your audience in mind. However, the other answers do not say much about which of those options to choose, so I'd like to cover that in more detail. Those words you're using, what do they mean? First, let's take a step back and look at what ...


3

You are being a bit inconsistent here. The reason for the introduction is that readers may not know the background. It would be good for them to see some sources that will fill them in beyond what you say. Mentioning a standard text or similar might be enough. You also have risk with the reviewer if you don't yield to them. They may have a lot of control ...


3

"I only take students with a lot of experience in my field, because I don't have the resources to train them adequately". I don't think there's a reason or need to come up with some excuse that may not hold up to scrutiny, or look bad when students in different situations start comparing notes. In this case, I don't see any real problem with the ...


2

Going to frame challenge a bit here...the situation you describe in your question doesn't really fit together with the problem you're experiencing. Either you refer to things "common knowledge" - in that case, really not much need to cite but also no reason to put in your paper as its own section, or you refer to things "not common knowledge&...


2

Cite repeatedly from the Encyclopedia of Machine Learning, available here: https://link.springer.com/referencework/10.1007/978-0-387-30164-8 It's a reference work, where many famous people in the field explained core ML concepts in an accessible way. Cite whatever lemma you need for whatever concept you introduce. The confusion matrix is definitely in there. ...


2

This may seem like a joke, but it isn't intended as such. I'll give you an algorithm. Find a problem that seems suitable. Work like crazy to try to solve that problem, either establishing a proof of correctness or a counterexample. Spend enough time and effort at this to determine whether it should be successful (either way) in a reasonable amount of time. ...


2

I think the whole concept of planning research is misleading. If you can make a detailed plan, maybe even including the results, then it's craftsmanship and not research. E.g. try to devise a plan for proving the Collatz conjecture. But as your PhD program seems to have a fixed run time of three years, it's good to create a schedule for yourself, how much ...


1

You can always edit an abstract slightly to your benefit using square brackets: The atomistic [micro-]scale shall be considered. It's a widely accepted way of editing abstracts to help with context. For example it's used when written news wants to add clarity to direct quotes.


1

Talk to your professor. Your professor is going to be the one marking your paper, so they're the natural one for you to ask. As the comments pointed out, it's unlikely that anyone's going to be reading your thesis besides the professor who's marking it, so asking your professor about the best way to ethically address the potential for your research subject ...


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