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54

Clearly your advisor thinks well of you and thinks you are ready to move to the next level professionally. You both missed the issue at an earlier stage. Had he found it then he might well have pointed you to a fix rather than providing it. He is probably as pleased as you are that a fix was possible. So thank him for support and guidance (perhaps "...


38

Of course, slide presentations are a very recent development. Even the humble overhead projector didn't exist when I defended. We wrote with chalk on a slate like material. Yes, you can do a presentation without slides. In some ways you can make a better presentation unless you are very skilled with slide creation. Most slide presentations are incredibly ...


14

It depends on the field. If you have a lot of data to show, will be hard without slides. The question could also be asked for lectures.


13

Just write a short paragraph at the end thanking your advisor for all their help during the writing of the thesis. If you ever turn it to a research paper, they’ll be a coauthor obviously.


8

In the UK it is very rare to have slides in what we call a Viva, which serves the same purpose as a defense. In general, a viva last 2-3 hours, and for the first 10 minutes, the candidate will describe their "thesis" - i.e. what it is they are claiming we know now, that we didn't know before they started. The rest of the 2 hours 50 minutes is the ...


7

Adding to @Stephen_McKean's answer, and also considering @Elizabeth_Henning's comment that the question is very likely not the real question in the questioner's mind... My first point would be that it is entirely reasonable for a math grad student to not be able to come up with a research project that is do-able, interesting (to experts!?!), and hasn't ...


7

As mentioned by Buffy in the comments, you're unlikely to find an actual ratio to answer your question without gathering some data. However, it seems like your question is actually where your research project would come from as a PhD student in pure math. The answer is quite simple: it depends on you and your advisor. Have an idea for your project? Tell ...


7

In German-speaking countries, or at least in Austria, the abbreviation DDr. mult. is used to denote people who have more than two doctorates. Googling for DDr. mult. allows one to identify some persons, but I cannot quickly verify whether they received just three or even four+ such titles. However, note that some of them should actually be labelled DDr. h.c. ...


5

When I wrote my Master's thesis, I had several parts where other group members and my advisor contributed parts, even if those were only helpful discussions that lead to further insight. Apart from mentioning this in the usual acknowledgements at the end of my thesis, I also added references to "private communications" with the respective ...


5

I have seen people doing the work on the chalk board or in some countries they sit down together and go over the pages of your draft. Then again, in a formal setting where you have to present your work with a time constraint you might not be able to cover everything you did without slides.


4

According to this 2009 newspaper article, there is at least one person, a retired professor from India, who holds five PhDs.


4

My PhD advisor demands a presentation without slides even though we are in a field that works with a lot of images, for example from electron microscopy. We only have a blackboard/whiteboard. There was only one exception where an industry partner wanted a powerpoint presentation. This was continued even during the pandemic, so that we have to draw on a ...


4

A little bit of a different perspective here - public speaking in general vs. a thesis presentation. But I believe the same things that work in one type of speech work in another. Obviously the expectations of your particular field, your university/department and your advisor are most critical. But assuming that you are either expected or encouraged to have ...


3

There is hardly any basis here for a distinction. Both are good. Both are willing to work with you. Both will provide a valuable experience. You could just "flip a coin", actually, and reach a good outcome. But once you decide, make a firm commitment and stick with it. Don't break contact with the other prof, however. Both can be valuable as letter ...


3

It is okay to reuse or “recycle” symbols - I sometimes joke that this is actually good practice since it is “environmentally friendly” and saves mental overhead. However, you must make sure that you do not use the same symbol to denote two different quantities within the same proof or calculation. That is a mistake and invites potential confusion or ...


3

Yes, it is certainly possible. One of the good things about starting a viva with a brief talk is not to transfer useful information (we have already read the thesis very carefully) but to give the candidate a chance to get "warmed up" and deal with any nerves they may have. So I would be happy with whatever form of presentation suited the ...


3

I have been the independent chair of a successful PhD thesis defence (within the past few years) where the only visual aids were a couple of pieces of paper. However, that's just one, compared to a lot that did use slides.


3

Yes, it makes sense. No, you didn't do anything wrong. Write up what you did for your thesis along with the necessary supporting material, but avoid complaining about what the institute did. I think the key misunderstanding here is that they were giving you an opportunity to interact in a real system and that they might be able to take advantage of what you ...


2

Since you are not asking about the legalities of handing in such a thesis, I will assume that you have checked that there are no problems obtaining your qualifying degree after handing it in. My answer is contingent on that. I am not in CS, but I don't think the answer is field specific. (in fact it is probably not even specific to academia, but also holds ...


2

I know this is quite old, but I am providing an answer as I have experienced something similar recently. Given your description, it looks like you have done the majority (>90%) of the work and, as such, I see no reason why you should even bother with asking your supervisor if they like to be a co-author. I strongly disagree with Pedro's suggestion, as if ...


2

It sounds like the way you did the reference was fine and perfectly standard practice in mathematics. And I doubt Turnitin is remotely useful for mathematics anyway. The more important question is whether what you did meets the expectations of your committee, and you'll have to ask them that.


2

I'd suggest that if a person has a doctorate that you should give the title, even if they are your friends. It honors their achievement. Your dissertation will be read by others, possibly many others if it is published.


2

You can only put a book or paper in the bibliography if you have cited it in the text, either via a quote or by citing its argument[s], theory/ies, etc. If it's just generally deepened your understanding and you do not quote it or cite its argument[s] it cannot be included in the bibliography. That said, in such a case it can be very easy to work in a ...


2

The guidelines regarding plagiarism vary quite a bit according to location and subject area, as plagiarism is primarily an ethical matter rather than a legal one. In physics and mathematics theses written in places where I have been involved with the process, it is commonplace to start a chapter of the thesis with: "This chapter is drawn from [cite the ...


2

If you're asking whether you're allowed to do this: the thesis style guide supplied by your university or department should tell you one way or another. If you're asking whether it's technically possible: if you're using LaTeX+BibTeX, the \nocite{} command, placed somewhere in the body of your LaTeX document, will add an item from your BibTeX database to ...


2

This is something to discuss with your advisor, but I can make a suggestion. Some research that is based on constructed models turns out to be questionable if the model lacks stability and resiliency (robustness). There is a branch of science/math called catastrophe theory in which small changes to a system can produce dramatic, non-continuous, results. One ...


1

This is your thesis advisor's job, even though this might be a borderline case. He does represent your findings with his own name, after all. What I would suggest is to thank him in the preamble, and make a footnote in that specific place the contribution took place in the text.


1

You credit your advisor's help at the front pages of your dissertation, where he or she is listed as your advisor. In a regular advising relationship, the contributions of the advisor are diffuse, at multiple levels, and impossible to quantify or pinpoint meaningfully. No need to make special mention of the very special circumstances that you relate, it will ...


1

I think you should decide between these (both good) options on the merits of the experience - the technical aspects and the mentoring possibilities. The fact that you have worked with one of the professors (a plus) but that she will be on sabbatical leave (perhaps a disadvantage) may be one factor in your decision. I don't think you need consider any ...


1

I think you could send either version, correctly labelled. But you can also indicate that the other version is available "on request". For example, if you send the official version, say that you have updated the work since and can make the newer work available if requested. This makes it clear and also indicates that you haven't been inactive in ...


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