63

Is this normal? No. In most places, wage theft is a serious crime. Who should I speak to about this? The HR department. Possibly also the department chair. Provide a detailed written statement of what happened and when.


56

No. Without a degree and a position at a university or research institute, it is highly unlikely you can get any kind of funding for research. You can try to get a job at a company that does research in such topics (which requires who to have the background knowledge, not necessarily a degree), but this will also be hard to get.


43

You seem to misunderstand the review process. The authors are not obliged to follow your suggestions. Typically, when authors submit a revised version of their paper, they also include a 'response to reviews' in which they explain what they have done as a result of reviewer comments. If they wish, they can argue that certain comments or suggestions are ...


39

Your friend is probably thinking of Sci-Hub. Warning: it's likely illegal, including to use the service (as opposed to uploading stuff onto it), in most jurisdictions. If it's not already illegal in your jurisdiction, the trend is towards illegality (i.e. lawsuit after lawsuit has been ruled on, and they are usually in favor of the copyright holder). If you ...


35

To add to J. Fabian Meier's answer, there is more to getting a research grant than just the research part and having a good idea. There are many requirements in terms of financial aspects (turning your proposed budget into something the research funder will accept), rules and regulations about what can and can not be funded, legal issues (Most research ...


19

You can't get your own research grant, but if you start your own business you can be part of a research consortium. I worked on a Horizon 2020 project. Those are big, international projects, where the funding agency (European Commission) requires that the partners are from different countries and some are small or medium enterprises. One of our partners ...


19

No, this is not normal. If an agreement about number of working hours and an hourly salary is made, the salary is normally supposed to be paid according to that agreement. It is not clear to me if a contract was written up, or if everything was oral agreements. If there is no contract, and no written correspondence to confirm the agreement, you will ...


18

In most cases, research grants are not awarded to people. They are awarded to research institutions. So no, an individual cannot get those grants on their own, no matter what degree they have or do not have. There is no rule preventing eligible research institutions from hiring someone who has no degrees and having those people apply for grants on behalf ...


16

Yes, there is scientific value in the project you describe. When writing the paper, be sure to highlight any special handling you had to do for Albanian (or whatever language you choose). It will be interesting to compare the accuracy of the approach applied to Albanian vs. English. It is possible (though I suspect it's unlikely) that you might end up with ...


14

Your enthusiasm and dedication are commendable, but you are misunderstanding the peer review process. You are not a gatekeeper. You are a participant in a collaborative process to identify publishable papers and improve them. This process involves the authors, the peer reviewers (plural), and is mediated (if necessary) by the journal editor. Let's talk only ...


13

In addition to Sci-Hub and Unpaywall mentioned by Allure, there are also databases for scientific papers which were published legally with an Open Access license, such as CORE an BASE.


11

I would also add to the above the very commonly used resource Library Genesis, which is less for paywalled papers and more for pdf's of books, including textbooks, but do keep in mind that this definitely falls in the same legal gray area as Sci-Hub and things like torrenting copyrighted materials.


9

Asking to include these references was wrong in the first place. According to your comments to the question(1) and to the accepted answer, the literature you asked to cite : is co-authored by yourself is "not closely related" to the paper under review. As reviewer, you should only suggest to discuss closely related literature. Moreover, before ...


9

It would depend on the field obviously but I'll have a go at the most common I see in my area. Outside the scope of the journal Has been done before Incremental - minor value Value of the work was not clear Not appropriately supported with experimental results Badly presented in the context of the discipline Badly written


9

You should report this to a some authority. The chances are good (but we do not know this) that the person has done this before and will do it again. Ethically if you have evidence enough to make a formal complaint you should to prevent them exploiting people. Ethically and practically are, however, two different things - you will have to make the decision ...


7

Don't think of yourself as stuck in a research area. You are starting to gain some independence and can also start to morph your research into any area you choose. Over your career you might do this multiple times, actually. Use the post doc to start to explore the areas you'd rather work in as much as you can. Staying with your doctoral advisor might not be ...


6

Google has a search engine called Google Scholar. According to them, "It provides a simple way to broadly search for scholary literature. From one place, you can search across many disciplines and sources: articles, theses, books, abstracts and court opinions, from academic publishers, professional societies, online repositories, universities and other ...


5

At good journals, publication is a competitive process. They get far more acceptable papers than they can process, so it's not true that all papers that are good enough are accepted. Only papers that are better than almost all the other papers that are submitted are accepted. If your paper did not go out for review, it's likely that, even if the paper was ...


5

If there are no comments, it is possible that an area editor simply made the decision to reject your paper based on the topic itself. This can happen in high volume high impact journals. Editors are constantly sifting through tonnes of papers looking for gold nuggets.


5

It is okay in the sense that it doesn't violate any ethical rules. However, I think it is unlikely that you will find success on this path. Professors receive an unhealthy number of emails every day, and this increases with an unhealthy number of PhD application emails in PhD application season. If you want an email to a professor to be successful, it may ...


4

It sounds like you've learned a lot since your PhD, which is good - it means you've developed as a researcher. I know that at the start of my PhD there are lots of things I could have done better (and in half the time) if I'd known a bit more. But I couldn't do that then. I needed to have those experiences in order to improve and learn. I think you should ...


4

When a candidate enters a program, the admissions materials are intended to help a committee and/or an advisor make a prediction about successful completion. If they are sufficiently conservative, then the predictions, when positive, are fairly, but not absolutely, reliable. This interim analysis has the same purpose. We, the faculty, need to make a ...


3

As suggested by @Buffy, at least in the departments I've been a member of, it is unusual for a student to fail their first year viva at the re-submission stage (although more common for the first submission to fail). The first year transfer fills a number of purposes: Guide the clearly unsuitable to alternative life directions. I work in a molecular biology ...


3

As much you deepen your read of papers on a topic, the "first papers" will be cited recurrently. However, the first paper candidates could be extracted computationally. You could use scientometrics techniques that map most cited works, for example. The most cited works are good candidates to be considered an "original paper". Another way ...


3

First, get tenure. If your current path works for that then you have time for the longer run. Get that done. But one of the ways to build a long term research program is to do it in collaboration with others. If you have a few people (three is enough) in your department that share research ideas in general, you can form a weekly seminar that meets for an ...


3

Unpaywall is a good option to access free papers from most of the disciplines. Arxiv.org is an open-source community of free papers. It keeps on growing nowadays. https://doaj.org/ community-curated online directory that indexes and provides access to high quality, open access, peer-reviewed journals. Academia https://www.academia.edu/ offers a great way to ...


3

This is not an experiment, as you do not have experimental control (the ability to manipulate an independent variable, or to randomly assign participants to different manipulations). The point of an experiment is to demonstrate causality: that the independent variable determines (at least in part) the dependent or outcome variable. In your case, there is not ...


3

John Nash's thesis was 26 pages long with 2 references and he later won a Nobel price. What matters is scientific quality not quantity, if your ideas are superior nobody will object the length (mine was less than 100 pages).


2

arXiv provides preprints of scientific articles that have not been peer reviewed. Many of the articles do subsequently get published in peer reviewed journals. https://arxiv.org/


2

The issue is not whether you are in the US or outside the US. Frankly, nobody cares. There are many excellent universities outside the US (e.g., Cambridge University), and there are some horrible universities in the US (I won’t name examples), and obviously there are some excellent universities in the US and horrible universities in other countries. So if ...


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