30

the professor has told me several times he would be very interested in having me as a PhD student. So, I guess, he may not appreciate the fact that I have decided to pursue another area with another supervisor Could be, if this person is vindictive and unethical. But if they are a decent human being they would write a gushing letter about how they would ...


7

I don't understand why you are concerned unless you happen to be in a place where it is common for an admissions committee to reach out for comment to others not mentioned in an application. I think and hope that such a thing is considered improper almost everywhere. And, therefore, rare. Your application materials contain certain required items, probably ...


4

I'm also in physics and I use Notion. It is a web-based platform that allows you to build an entire workspace (some call it a "second brain") and really tailor it to your own needs. It also has an Android and iOS app. You can use it for very basic tasks like to-do lists and notes, but once you get the hang of it you can extend it to manage your ...


4

I don't see any problem with adding additional collaborative projects, but make sure you can finish something and aren't stretching yourself so thin that you make no progress. There's nothing wrong with exploring research interests, if anything, it's a benefit. But you also want to show you have some follow-through. It's completely different to have started ...


3

You are being a bit inconsistent here. The reason for the introduction is that readers may not know the background. It would be good for them to see some sources that will fill them in beyond what you say. Mentioning a standard text or similar might be enough. You also have risk with the reviewer if you don't yield to them. They may have a lot of control ...


3

I agree with your advisor that most people would consider that the purpose of the doctorate is to teach you how to be a researcher and another degree isn't going to give you anything you don't already have. And giving the opportunity to another student is a positive good in the eyes of many, possibly most. Moreover, if your goal is to do research and get ...


3

If you don’t have at least one research problem, you can’t write a plan. That’s the core of your difficulty (based on your comment in which you explained that you don’t have a research problem). A plan is the articulation of what your objectives are and how you think you might achieve them. But you don’t actually have any concrete objectives. So the idea of ...


3

Decide on what this field means to you and act accordingly. From your post, you are a PhD student and therefore presumably already have a field of study. If this is your first semester it will be a simpler conversation than if this is your sixth. I'm going to assume that you don't want to change your current field of research, but would instead like to ...


2

Going to frame challenge a bit here...the situation you describe in your question doesn't really fit together with the problem you're experiencing. Either you refer to things "common knowledge" - in that case, really not much need to cite but also no reason to put in your paper as its own section, or you refer to things "not common knowledge&...


2

Cite repeatedly from the Encyclopedia of Machine Learning, available here: https://link.springer.com/referencework/10.1007/978-0-387-30164-8 It's a reference work, where many famous people in the field explained core ML concepts in an accessible way. Cite whatever lemma you need for whatever concept you introduce. The confusion matrix is definitely in there. ...


2

This may seem like a joke, but it isn't intended as such. I'll give you an algorithm. Find a problem that seems suitable. Work like crazy to try to solve that problem, either establishing a proof of correctness or a counterexample. Spend enough time and effort at this to determine whether it should be successful (either way) in a reasonable amount of time. ...


2

I think the whole concept of planning research is misleading. If you can make a detailed plan, maybe even including the results, then it's craftsmanship and not research. E.g. try to devise a plan for proving the Collatz conjecture. But as your PhD program seems to have a fixed run time of three years, it's good to create a schedule for yourself, how much ...


2

Creating the graphs and tables for a paper does not necessarily entitle you to authorship (https://publicationethics.org/files/Authorship_DiscussionDocument.pdf). But creating those graphs and tables nearly always requires some other activity that does entitle you to authorship. Your work should be acknowledged at a minimum. If you are entitled to ...


2

It is hard to see how doing research, especially collaborative research, could be a bad thing. If someone (and there may be a few) would mark you down for that then you probably don't want to work with them in any case. However, an advisor would probably want some commitment from you that you will focus on the research you do with them. That is natural. But ...


1

You need to have a discussion with your supervisor. Put the focus on your needs (you need to establish yourself as an independent and broad-profile researcher to reach the goal of the position, which is to get a faculty job), and clarify their urgency in the light of the tight academic job market. In that discussion, you should also point out that the ...


1

You were completely wrong in thinking it was unethical to co-author a paper you had no part in writing, or that the other person did anything wrong. Quite the contrary. Contributions to papers may take very different form; one can merit a co-authorship without writing a word if one contributed essential ideas. As a famous example, Adelman of the RSA code ...


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