32

First, talk to a medical professional about pain and migraines. Second, find a way to schedule breaks in your day. Working more isn't the same as working better. In fact you can actually inhibit clear thinking if you try to push on a problem too hard. Your brain has a way of putting things together during periods of "rest". Third, make some of ...


27

Simultaneous discovery of research ideas is an entirely normal occurrence in academic research. It happened to me several times over my career so far, and I’m just one guy — some versions of this happen to practically everyone who works in crowded, competitive research areas. I am confused what should I do now. What should you do? First of all, take a deep ...


12

You have identified a small part of a problem that grows significantly as you progress through an academic career. Faculty members will not only have to find the balance between spending time on research and preparing for presentations; they will have to find the balance between: doing research supervising the research of PhD students writing grant ...


12

So far, nothing in your question at all indicates they have indeed stolen your results. You can claim you came up with them earlier, but the history of science has had plenty of occasions where the same results were formulated independently with years, sometimes even decades or centuries (!) separating them. This seems the most likely conclusion. In general ...


11

I was like this at one point and then I just stopped meeting their standards. I slept at 10 every night, did not work until noon, basically prioritized my own health over work. Nothing really changed as far as my research went. My supervisor did raise their voice at one point over progress, then I was just like, in my head "its either me committing ...


11

This is perfectly fine. You are now doing interdisciplinary research. Defined by the NSF: Interdisciplinary research is a mode of research by teams or individuals that integrates information, data, techniques, tools, perspectives, concepts, and/or theories from two or more disciplines or bodies of specialized knowledge to advance fundamental understanding ...


9

My answer would be, don't underestimate how much you learn through doing and interacting during a PhD. There are many interdisciplinary groups offering PhD projects for people with a physics degree and little or no biological knowledge, but within which you'll be strongly exposed to some biology questions. That won't make a biologist of you, but biology ...


8

Why not? Even if it was not ML/AI-related, it'd still be perfectly valid. But especially with ML, most of the time, the motivation for the study lies in the subject area. It makes sense to look for similar problems (if only in formalism) in other domains, too, and see what has been done to solve them. So yes, perfectly normal to end up with something like &...


8

I would recommend citing both your previous paper, and the other one, as well, explaining the genesis of the result correctly proven in your previous paper. That way someone just looking at the bibliography (without following the chain of past references!) has a better idea what's going on. Sure, either way you are probably avoiding any charge of not giving ...


7

An abusive situation does not stop being abusive just because it has nice academia/workplace words like "schedule" or "group" or "manager". You are in an abusive workplace. I've been there too. Your workplace culture means it will stay abusive, and you probably don't have any realistic ways to change that. That means, in my book,...


7

should the author of the original paper let him/her go away with this excuse? I honestly don't know what you mean by "let him/her go away", but I think you're overestimating your own power in this situation. The rest of my answer will basically say not to accuse someone of something unless you can prove it, but even if you can you are not this ...


5

Look for help within your department/institute. You state that you are struggling with fatigue and sensory meltdown. That means that you are probably also not in the best place to make these kind of decisions, since you also feel overwhelmed by this decision you need to make. Don't try to do this by yourself. Talk to your department head, ask what resources ...


4

First (the bad news): Gary Stormo lived in a very different world. At the time science was working in a much more compartmental way: For example, a physicist solving partial differential equations (via numerical models) in biology, if the numerical model was succesful, it would have been hugely succesful. And nowadays the same numerical model or the results ...


4

Choosing a suitable problem requires deep insight. Often a student just finishing coursework won't have that insight yet. Insight comes from very deep dives into the essence of a problem space. It is an emergent property, not easily or automatically attained. Hence, students are often guided to a problem (or problems) by their advisor who does have this ...


4

For a doctoral dissertation (I missed the tag, initially), there is probably no way out. I suspect that there are very few doctoral programs, world wide, that will give you a doctorate for a "faithful, but failed, attempt". The solution is to, sadly enough, pick a different problem, perhaps related to the original, but which is more amenable to ...


4

The answer is simple but difficult. Write the best papers if you want to publish in the best journals. There is no bar for being an individual. Do good work. Write it up properly and submit it. But, to write good papers without any guidance is very difficult. There must be something "real" behind the papers, usually research and that, alone, is ...


3

Do you know if there is a way of doing a PhD and at the same time studying a new field ? Like a PhD in computational biology and at the same time taking a biology bachelor and master degree ? I don't see why you would need to do a Biology BSc/MSc if you already have physics degrees. I am a biologist and have had many colleagues doing their PhDs in fields ...


3

You can attempt to overrule the editor-in-chief by contacting the publisher. You will need very strong evidence, but if your complaint is successful, the publisher can fire the editor-in-chief and retract the plagiarized paper(s).


3

My experience with all the collaborations so far: they fail badly if they're forced (as a structure). First, you get motivation to collaborate, and that means specific problems or goals to act upon. Bryan is right - if you have specific, actionable items to produce within the collaboration, that allows for bringing people from different groups together and ...


2

Research is always competitive. In STEM, and that's all I will discuss here, you compete against nature or the vagaries of mathematical structure. This competition, if you do seriously challenging research, is far outweighing, in my opinion, the competition of your peers. Some people like to measure competition by counting how many papers get rejected in the ...


2

I'd argue every field of work without hard-capped performance is competitive. There is only so much one can do working as the customer support; it is a much needed job, yes, but the competition is limited to some extent by the reasonable "top achievable performance". On the other hand, in academia people normally strive to do good science, so only ...


2

One definition of an academic field that would not have a lot of competition, would be one where there was sufficient funding that every high quality grant proposal in that domain got funded. If you find a field like that, let me know!


2

Typically a Ph.D. student would have had enough exposure at the graduate level to be able to choose a problem they find interesting as their thesis topic with the help of their supervisor. It does not always have to be a novel solution. For instance, it can be a different way of proving something already proven. They also can continue to study and take ...


2

I think it would be a mistake to make assumptions here. Collaborating with such a professor is a real opportunity and you shouldn't leave hard feelings. Professors are busy, but it would be good to contact them again asking if they are still interested and asking them for their suggestion on next steps from both of you. If you have deadlines (as professors ...


1

Talk to a medical professional. Then talk to the disability office. It sounds like your work is causing you physical and psychological harm, and this is manifesting in physical harm. The migraine headaches, inability to sleep, and such that you're feeling? In basically every developed country, that legally counts as a disability, and they're legally ...


1

Francis Crick did just this. Find a congenial environment. To do this, spend some time reading journals to find articles and scientists who do work that interests you. If they are at universities, apply. This is one of the rare cases where I would recommend contacting someone and meeting them to assess your past education and what you might need. You might ...


1

Is there a way to survive that? Yes, there is. Daniel Hatton has hinted at it but I'll elaborate. During your research, there will be many failures and "schedule overruns". Thankfully, this is expected in academia - you are dealing with the unknown, after all. However, if the part you have failed at is actually already done by someone, it rapidly ...


1

I interpret "consecutive patients" to mean consecutive regarding calendar date. The beginning and ending dates should be reported. The date might refer to either the date of the beginning or the date of the end of an episode of treatment if treatment time is more than one day. Information about treatment times should also usually be reported. If ...


1

I think there is hope for you. For two reasons. First, the minor reason. Don't be terribly concerned that some parts of math are harder for you to gain insight than others. That is pretty natural. I had great insight into analysis and topology, but very little in abstract algebra, despite the structurally similar axiomatic basis. But insight only comes from ...


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