284

I don't feel that general academic ethics obliges you to report this, unless you have reason to believe that it might be endangering the research of the lab (giving inaccurate results, introducing viruses to lab computers, etc). You will have to make your own judgment as to whether you are obliged to report by any of the following: your own personal code of ...


182

I would stay away from his "personal laptop" in the future and avoid peeking at other people's "very personal" screens. It is not your job to report this. And you should not be looking at other people's screens. He decided to use the software on his personal station, not on the resources of the university, so it is none of your concern. It is a typical "none ...


135

My advice is to just use the pirated software and not rock the boat, just like Drunken Code Monkey, for example, mentioned. This issue isn't something that you're likely to solve yourself. Instead, you're most likely going to spend large amount of time and energy on nothing and produce no results. The fact that your teacher just expects you to get cracked ...


134

It's not normal to work for a company for free, and I'd simply answer something like this: Dear X, I am glad to know that my PhD work caught your interest. I can provide more information under a suitable consultancy contract. Kind regards, L222 Note: We don't know the content of the company's email and, as some have remarked, the above ...


119

While it is true that software cracking is inappropriate and even illegal, almost everyone around me uses cracked software That is really bad and I know it happens also in my country (Italy). However, I think there is a false dilemma in your question: So what should I do? Having a talk with my teacher or simply quitting this course? There are not the ...


113

Why the university officials do not take action over this copyright violation? Because they can't. There is no way to tell whether a given electronic preprint violates the publisher's copyright-transfer agreement or not. Different publishers place different restrictions on authors' rights to redistribute their papers. Some allow posting pre-edited ...


98

In fact something great happened: Your research did have impact in the real world and seems to be useful - not everyone can say that! When it comes to legal issues, things are usually complicated and will involve copyright issues (of yours and of the journal / publisher) as well as authorship issues. Those vary between countries and it will be difficult to ...


97

Other answers make the case that you should ask for money for your services. I certainly think that is a very fair and reasonable thing to do, but rather than asking for money upfront, I would like to suggest the following strategy to maximize the benefit (in terms of financial gain, experience, and networking opportunities) that you can gain from this ...


84

You can use images showing up in Google Search if and only if the license allows for it. Therefore, you might be interested in Advanced Google Image Search, where you can search by copyright status. More information about the Usage rights search can be found here. For example, here are freely useable images searching for "Mars". Notice how many of them ...


81

One thing you should absolutely avoid doing is cracking the software yourself. That opens you personally to a whole lot of legal issues (IANAL, but this is kind of obvious). If your computer is really yours, it should be possible to complete the course without one. Not as convenient, of course (e.g. you may have to stay after classes to use the classroom PCs)...


62

While you might be in the legal right, I think trying to publish when the author wants to withdraw is likely to be more trouble than it is worth for a small society journal. You probably don't have the resources to get into a protracted battle if the author decides to be really problematic (e.g., a lawsuit). As I see it, there are three reasonable ...


53

The standard rule in my community is that once I finish reviewing a paper, I'm supposed to pretend that I don't know the paper exists. In particular, I am not supposed to use any insights I gained by reading that paper in my own research. I am not supposed to reveal the results to my colleagues. Some venues ask that I destroy any copies of the paper I'm ...


53

I've never worked with a commercial interest directly, but the impression I get from colleagues is that companies will take as much as they can and pay as little as possible. "It's just business" as they say. Your experience is valuable, so I wouldn't give it away for free. Ask them what kind of consulting fee they're offering and politely decline or ...


51

You are generally allowed to publish even in a non-open access journal even if a pre-print is on the arXiv. Most journal copyright agreements explicitly allow the authors to post the article online. Here's an example of a fairly generous one: The ASL hereby grants to the Author the non-exclusive right to reproduce the Article, to create derivative ...


51

Are you sure those "lots of professors" you're talking about are infringing copyright holder's right? Because of the way you put it, your "question" sounded to me as if you were claiming that posting your own paper on your personal website was always copyright infringement no matter what, which is not true. For example, here's an excerpt from Terms and ...


50

It seems to me that there are two orthogonal aspects to this: Copyright Attribution Either of these would in my eyes justify talking to the student and/or to the websites he posted at. Re 1, you will need to decide by yourself whether you want to stick with a narrow interpretation of your copyright. If you don't explicitly allow dissemination, then the ...


50

This seems to be a clear case of plagiarism, and potentially a copyright violation. The BSD license contains a line "Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer". If that was included in your Original code, then it seems that this was breached by the article authors. But even ...


49

Let's see through this step for step: Is this actually illegal? To give an extreme example: Homosexuality is in Scandinavia not only legal, but accepted in the culture including marriages while it is outlawed in many Islamic countries and punishable by death. So no, an argumentation that it is illegal because you personally think so does not hold water. ...


49

Discuss with the librarian - they may know what is available - ie it could be scanned while the book is refurbished and recovered. And, take the opportunity to explain to the librarian why it is worth saving - you know why as a specialist in the subject...


45

In general, it is not considered fair use to download the entirety of a textbook, regardless of whether or not you're a student or enrolled in a class using the textbook. Fair use normally is considered to extend to making copies of small excerpts of larger works. For instance, you could copy a particularly relevant figure from a book, or a quote from a ...


45

Short answer: Nope. Long answer: It's complicated. The proportion of the work copied can actually be the whole of the work (i.e. 100%), if the other parts of the fair use test provide a strong enough justification: The extent of permissible copying varies with the purpose and character of the use. Taking more of the copyrighted work than is ...


44

It's not necessarily crazy for academia.edu to ask for these things (although, as I say below, I certainly don't think users should agree to these terms). I imagine their lawyers advised them to use an agreement that covers all possible use cases as their business model evolves. For example, if they decided to charge their users membership fees, and only ...


44

While your CV can technically be regarded as a piece of intellectual property, the usual reason why people assert their copyright to a work by putting a copyright notice on it is to deter and prevent other people from copying or sharing that work (usually so they - the authors - can profit by selling the work). With your CV, it is actually in your interest ...


43

Unless the paper is available under a very permissive license, such as Creative Commons Attribution, you will need to seek permission. (There may be other legal possibilities, such as fair use or fair dealing, but that's a little subtle. See this story for more information on that.) The copyright owner is the person you need permission from. Who that is ...


43

Strictly speaking, the answer to your question is Never. Even after the copyright has expired, there is nothing to prevent a journal from keeping articles behind a paywall. Many journals will make articles open access after a certain amount of time, and after the copyright has expired, other people may freely distribute public domain articles. However, ...


43

I would encourage you to contact the authors. Both John Milnor and James Stasheff have their contact info on the web. As Stasheff is emeritus, Milnor might be a better bet.


42

Why, of course you should contact Google. More precisely, the Google Permissions page states that it is okay to use Google Map images for the purposes of research assuming that you provide proper attributions.


41

Did you sign an agreement to transfer copyright to someone else? Does your university policy (example) or employment contract specify that someone else holds the copyright to your thesis? If the answer to both questions is "no" then you, as the author of the thesis, hold the copyright. In the US, most university students retain the copyright for their ...


41

The main reason is inertia and lack of information, I think. Researchers are not really aware of the costs their institutions have to face to subscribe to journals. From their perspective, publishing and reading are mostly free. It is not always easy to tell whether you have access to a PDF file because of your university's subscriptions or because it is ...


41

Are you sure it is cracked software ? A 'warning' popup could just be phishing malware and you might expect that a feature to detect piracy would just shut the application down rather than just issue a warning. Equally it could be a prompt to upgrade to a different version or just an expired demo version which is no longer usable. Perhaps a more immediate ...


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