36

(Promoted from a comment.) As well as agreeing with other posters that you might as well start working on revisions yourself, I would strongly suggest that you contact the editor now rather than waiting for closer to the deadline. You can indicate your uncertainty, i.e. that everything might be OK (co-author responds to your queries, revisions get made, ...


31

There is already an assumption that authors working together have some level of positive relationship - whether colleagues, advisor/advisee, or relatives. These things need not be declared, because they don't influence the content of the work besides all the authors standing by it (which is a minimum requirement for even submitting the paper). If a sibling ...


18

It means that in the time interval from when the preprint was uploaded and now, the paper has been revised and this revised version has been accepted for publication at the journal. In other words, the revision and acceptance have already happened, though the journal may not (or may) have published it yet.


15

No information is probably better than misleading information. Any journal can talk about accepting "outstanding contributions", or whatever, on their homepage, without actually having high standards in practice. If you want to know how good a journal is, their aims and scope is not a good place to look. Either go to some independent source (e.g. ...


10

It's not just mathematical journals: most journals do not specify a "level of significance" or degree of selectivity that they intend to operate at. To understand why, consider the question from the editor's point of view. At every decent journal, every manuscript starts with editorial review to determine whether it is worth the time of reviewers. ...


8

I'm not sure you can get a definitive answer here, but my suggestion would be to let the paper stand on its own and just submit it to a different journal without further comment. I don't see anything wrong with making a suggestion to an editor, but suspect that it is likely to be rejected. If you give them full context then I think it is even more likely to ...


7

As far as the journal is concerned, your paper was declined (if I understood you correctly) and the next submission will be treated as a separate paper (even though the journal may know it's a new iteration of an old paper and it may still get the same associate editor and reviewers). This paper may have different authors, substance, or whatever -- it's a ...


7

I find nothing odd that assigning the handling editor takes a few extra weeks for some papers. Finding the correct editor to handle a paper can be harder in some case than others. It is better that the journal takes time to get that assignment right. I had a paper go out to referees and then months after submission it was given to a different editor who ...


7

Certainly you can start on revising yourself while you continue to try to reach the other person. If you reach them you can give them what you have done and continue from there. Perhaps you can reach them through a third party if you know of someone, perhaps someone they work with. Doing nothing seems like the worst option. But if you have to send in your ...


6

I am wondering if a call is not an option. You can also call the reception at his/her institute, one of the students, etc. The fact that the deadline for a paper you both wanted out is approaching gives you the right to try every way to contact him, in my opinion. This would also let you know if that person has problems of a sort, though their nature might ...


6

"Accepted by X" means the revised article has made it through peer review and will be published by journal X, unless some very unusual and unforeseen circumstance arises (for example if it is discovered there is a major problem that invalidates the entire paper which was missed by the referees). The accepted version may still be slightly different ...


6

Most journals labeled "open-access" are "open-access only". You don't have any other option for these. Because they are open-access, the journal can't make money in more traditional ways like selling access to university libraries - who would pay to access content that's already open? (I'm aware I'm simplifying a bit here) Be wary that ...


5

I think you (or the hypothetical person here) are gaming the system to your own disadvantage. I'm reading the first sentence as "...more than a Tier 2 journal...". You don't know you will be rejected. The suggestions of the reviewers might, when incorporated, result in acceptance. And there is no guarantee about the time to publication for any ...


5

Different fields have different conventions. I am a mathematician, and my advice reflects what I know about publishing conventions in that field. So please take this advice with a grain of salt. This said: Echoing the comments of m123, sleepy, and Lewian, I would advise you to ignore Elsevier's guidelines entirely. Submit your document in any format which ...


4

I think in this case, the easiest solution would be to publish your paper with a reference to that other student's thesis (or unpublished work).


3

For your question, it can be inferred that your paper was submitted to one of the research journals published by the American Physical Society (most likely one of the Physical Review journals). So what I am going to say here will be, in part, based on my specific knowledge of the APS journals. However, most of this answer could be applied to a much more ...


3

Is your collaborator employed somewhere, at university or in industry? If so, he surely has co-workers, and their e-mail addresses and phone numbers can be found somewhere in the internet. Try to get in touch with one of them. Call or e-mail his secretary, a postdoc, some other co-worker. At least one of them certainly knows why he does not answer and might ...


3

A conflict of interest is when you (the person with the conflict) has an interest in the results that counters or competes, or appears to counter/compete, with the desire to discover the truth. The fact that the co-authors are siblings, doesn’t in itself, cause a conflict of interest. In fact, I find it rather difficult to come up with a hypothetical ...


3

Circumstances can differ, but generally, unless you're in a sort of time trouble to get it published, it's never wrong to try a higher-impact journal first. In the worst case, you paper will be rejected by editor (and not sent for peer-review), which means that you won't lose too much time and will be able to submit it elsewhere. Of course, it does not mean ...


3

I don't know the rules for this specific journal, but in most venues you're not supposed to tweak the page geometry (margins, headers etc.) of a template, if one is given. To me, it feels dishonest to secretly shrink the margins and squeeze in more content. It may reflect badly on you if the editor notices it. In any case, I recommend that you contact one of ...


3

The main reason journals (actually publishers) do this is purely selfish - they simply want to keep your paper within one of "their" journals. I am almost certain for example that the two journals you mention are published by the same publisher. Papers are sort of currency in publishing since the number of papers published per year is a key metric ...


3

You have two lines of text, and that's really all there is: You can try to parse tea leaves, but you will never know. So sit back and relax: the decision will ultimately come, whatever it may be. To be more to the point, the editor really just says what is happening: They're having difficulty finding people willing to review the paper. One could come up with ...


2

Look at other review papers, especially in the journal you're interested in, and observe how they handled this issue of length restriction vs. detail.


2

If you have a list of DOIs of your papers, you could do this using the Semantic Scholar API, or this unofficial Python interface for it. For a query using the DOI, you get a JSON object (or a dictionary with the Python API) that contains the list of author names and IDs.


2

No, publishing it in any form without all authors (and their consent) is misconduct. But you don't yet know that you are being blocked, and I doubt that you are, since it is pretty rare. You don't say how much time has passed but if it is less than, say, a month, there may not be any problem. People have other things to do. Email gets lost or misfiled. Lots ...


2

Let summarize formally. Publishing requires the positive active consent of all authors. Publishing something done by another without having them as author is plagiarism. So you are a bit stuck. But you have some options - I hope they don't put you at odds with your advisor, but some things are more important. First, you can contact the original student/...


2

I agree with Buffy but let me add: I think nothing good can come from resubmitting to the first journal after rejection, but something bad could. If the editor had thought you could further improve the paper and fare better in a third round of review, they would have suggested another revision. Rejecting a paper is a final decision. Arguing with an editor ...


2

I do not think there is a recipe for a good graphical abstract, but there are definitely some things to avoid. The key concepts of graphical abstracts are: They are graphical, not textual. They are abstracts, which means they are small and brief, not complete. Measure the size of the abstract on the journal website and design accordingly. Top things to ...


2

Whether or not a paper has to go through another round of reviews is up to the discretion of the editor. "Minor revision" and "major revision" are gradual, not categorical distinctions and have no guaranteed bearing on how the next round of revision must be treated.


2

This depends on the policies of the specific journal you are submitting to. Most journals will permit authors to upload preprints to such websites without any issues, but it is always good to check the journal's policies to be sure. This is what Academia.edu has to say about this issue in their copyright policy: Do I own my work or article? Do I have the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible