66

If your advisors know of the problem, they can help fix it. For example, perhaps they might suggest submitting the article to a different conference. Even if the problem is not fixable, they can still help mitigate it, e.g. by mentioning in any reference letters that you have written a marvelous piece of work that wasn't published because of some confusion ...


57

Well, there were a lot of mistaken decisions here, including by the journal to list your name. To answer your title question, you should have, before the paper was submitted, told the group you didn't want to be involved, whether you said something like "I disagree with the conclusions of this paper, and don't want to be an author," or a white lie ...


35

You should have asked the co-authors not to be included up front. Leaving it until the journal asks to confirm your authorship is a lot more rude to your co-authors than just communicating with them. It makes them look dishonest or disorganized to the journal if you later ask to not be included. However, if you got to the point you did, you should have ...


26

It is obviously not ok to publish the work of someone else without asking all authors. It is also certainly startling to see it done in such an apparently careless manner (as an unedited copy of a thesis chapter that doesn’t conform to the standards of the publication journal - and still somehow gets published). So what happened is puzzling. Realistically, ...


26

A colleague and I once had to deal with a very similar situation: after telling our then-boss that we disagreed with his interpretations, he went ahead and presented them at a conference, listing us as co-authors. In that case, there was no paperwork to confirm co-authorship permission. We ended up sending a letter along the following lines: We note that we ...


16

You cannot answer “convincingly”, because your assumption that it is okay not to provide the code is incorrect, and the reviewer is correct to ask for it. And the fact that it’s time-consuming to prepare the code for release is neither here nor there: it’s also time-consuming to write a good paper and polish it over and over to make it into something people ...


16

While most the journals that I have dealt with inform me of the editors' decision, I have found that a significant minority do not. I've found this to be the case in fields with significantly different publication practices (e.g., computer science, biology), so I don't think it's field dependent. Likewise, there seems to be little consistency in which ...


11

Assuming it is true, I'd say that I'd made a good faith effort to keep it to the limits, considering whether any of the material was extraneous, but it is still at 37 pages. But also add that you would welcome advice from reviewers including advice on reducing the length. I doubt that a detailed technical statement will get the result you want, since the ...


10

Perhaps most important is to explain why this paper belongs in this journal, and not in another journal that allows longer papers. I am not sure of the research area, but in mathematics there are journals that allow much longer papers than 30 pages. What is so special about this journal? If there is somehow not a more appropriate journal, have a look at ...


10

For the journals I review for, I have the impression that it is more common to not inform the referee about the decision rather than to do so, except if there is some communication from the authors to the referee. Of course, this might be highly field-dependent, so without much more information, this question is likely hard to draw specific answers.


7

There are no models for this. I think you have answered your own question here: answer the reviewer politely and convincingly while explaining that I am providing some part of my programs, not all of it. You suggest several reasons why not all the code is called for. Some is extraneous. Some is working but not fit for public consumption (all too often true)...


6

Contact with the IEEE conference mail and the edas system as soon as possible. The edas mail is: help@edas.info The IEEE conference you should search in its website. At contact section probably. If there's an incongruence between the document and the system they would detect it, but there's no guarantee. So, notify them there was an erratum before the ...


5

Let me try to capture the thoughts in the comments and add a bit, though I can't be specific, not knowing your work. The reviewer has asked for your code. It might be appropriate or not to release it, depending on too many things to list here. But if you don't want to release it since future work depends on it and you prefer to keep it private for now, it ...


5

For the first question, it depends on the journal, the paper and the editor. For the second question, when receiving a revised paper, the editor/associate-editor may sometimes read it by himself and take a decision directly without asking the reviewers or remove one reviewer. This is done sometimes if the revisions are minor like fixing some typos. Or the ...


5

This seems like a case in which a delegation from your group should ask for an intervention from a higher level. If it is a general problem in your research group then department heads and deans need to be aware of it. You may not get the feedback you need, other than from each other, but the "permission to publish" needs to get resolved, perhaps ...


4

Based on the discussion in the comments, i.e. given that your primary concern is that the paper might be rejected after a very slow editorial process and then be hard to get accepted at another journal because it is no longer relevant/"hot"/topical/etc ... I think you have only two (not entirely distinct) choices. As suggested by @EthanBolker, try ...


4

Please note that this does not substitute proper legal advice. In the US, I believe that patent protection falls under the 'first inventor to file' rule. So it is not relevant who the first inventor is, but who the first inventor is who files for patent protection. So if you want to claim IP protection in the US then the only relevant place to file is at the ...


3

The "Golden Rule" is a good start for most academic ethics questions. Treat other people the way you would want to be treated. I would hope that if your co-authors disagreed with the paper that you were working on that you would want them to tell you and that you would not want them to want to avoid disagreeing with you on research matters (which ...


3

The worst case is that you are accused by someone of plagiarism. And that is pretty bad. But you don't ask for solutions, though user Younes provides one in a comment. Contact the organizers, explaining the situation, apologizing and asking for a correction. The organizers, if they have any experience, will have dealt with submission problems in the past and ...


3

Yes, Open Science Framework (OSF) allows you to save any kind of research ouput to obtain a timestamp. You can change the privacy setting so that your research output becomes a 'private project', invisible to the public.


3

If during submission, you clearly state that this is a translation of paper X, then I don't see an issue. It might however be a good idea to inquire with the journal beforehand whether they do publish translations of already published papers; not all journals might do that. Also, you need to check with the journal where the English version has been published ...


3

You want to provide maximal useful information. That should include funding sources and a current address. Your friend should provide the journal with all that information. They will decide how to use it. A paper I wrote years ago needed three affiliations. It started with The footnote read That was in the days before email. Now there would be a current ...


2

Sure, just write an email to the editor, specifying exactly what was changed/missing. (Of course, it should be reasonable enough to warrant the extra work for the editor, and, if it got sent out for review already, also for the referees.)


2

It depends how they use the paragraph. If they make it clear it is quoted from another source, e.g. if I wrote: "In this question, Parever wrote "Copy-editor for an academic journal here with an issue I've never come across before. We work with Chicago-style footnotes." -- then it is fine as long as it's cited. This kind of usage would fall ...


2

They need to give a citation, but, if it is permitted to quote the entire paragraph, then they don't need permission from the other authors. Whether it is permitted or not is a question of copyright and fair-use exemptions. If they still hold copyright jointly, then each of them needs to give permission. If your journal holds it then I see little problem as ...


2

No, agreeing to peer review a paper for an editor would never cause the editor to have a conflict of interest. A conflict of interest would only occur if the author somehow incentivized the editor to make a decision on a paper. B providing (or failing to provide) a peer review is not an incentive to an editor, and it is unrelated to the decision on the ...


2

The idea of that word file is that it already contains the correct layout for an article. You only need to change the text and overwrite what is in the word file, except for the formatting. Whenever you add new section headings and the like, make sure to copy the style from the previous section headings. The layout file already contains examples for many ...


2

How core were your skills or contribution to the research work in question ? If you just contributed something secondary, e.g. statistical analysis for a small-scale social research project, then you could have plausibly asked to be left off the authors' roll. Maybe insist on it since you have reservations on the conclusions published - which should have ...


1

Send a request for retraction to the journal. You're listed as a coauthor on the paper. This was against your consent, but you are still listed as a coauthor, and that gives you the right to write to the journal to request retraction. If you strongly disagree with the results of the paper, and you did not consent for it to be published with your name on it, ...


1

There are a lot of paper databases out there you can use to find some papers to read: ACM: https://www.acm.org/ arXiv: https://arxiv.org/ Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.com/ IEEEXplorer: https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/ ScienceDirect: https://www.sciencedirect.com/ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/ But not all the retrieved papers from these ...


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