67

Because they are incompetent. That's about it, really. But don't lump all publishers/journals as one - the typesetters for one journal might not be the same as that for another journal, even one published by the same publisher, and of course there are good and bad employees everywhere.


13

Duplicate of this question on TeX stacckexhange https://tex.stackexchange.com/questions/514898/how-can-i-format-a-document-for-submission-to-analysis-journal/514906 My answer: If the journal doesn't give you style files I suggest just vanilla arrticle class. If the paper is accepted they will format it. If not, you haven't cluttered it with formatting ...


10

If you want to submit elsewhere, the proper course is to formally withdraw your paper. Send a note to the editor. Then you are free to submit elsewhere. Don't make assumptions.


8

Publishers will adhere to their own style sheet. Just because you supply a photo-ready version of your document, there should be no expectation that it will be published as is. There should be absolutely no expectation that your font choice is followed, as fonts are a matter of journal style. Further, the journal fonts might not even be open source or ...


7

I'd recommend your second option. As for being embarrassed by your old paper, you could alleviate the problem by adding, either to the arXiv's comment field or to the paper itself, something like "This paper is a report on an undergraduate research project and there is no plan to publish it." (You might also point out explicitly the change in the spelling ...


7

In general whichever software you use to write the paper, word processor or LaTeX, make sure that it is easily adaptable. That said, most journals will have very specific requirements and it is difficult to make a generic file which suits all. In my experience the text is easier to adapt than the format (but this of course depends on the field). Beyond ...


6

Even though journals encourage authors to publish their code and make their research easily reproducible, in some fields most authors do not publish their code. In many cases, publishing code is plenty of extra work with little immediate benefit, as one would have to comment it/improve readability and check all licensing requirements of possibly reused ...


5

Can I submit my paper somewhere else during rebuttal period? No: Your paper is under review, submitting elsewhere would be a parallel submission. You could withdraw your paper and then submit elsewhere. Albeit, withdrawal seems unethical at this late stage.


3

From my understanding of the term, it seems to me that your job is to evaluate two things: Is the manuscript in "good enough" shape to publish without a proper, more rigorous peer-review process? As you say, there's no opportunity for a back-and-forth with the authors, although presumably they would have an opportunity to incorporate your feedback. So you'd ...


3

One issue that I have run into is the outsourced typesetting staff ignoring the provided images and using Acrobat to clip the image out of the author PDF, which rasterizes it at what seems to be the screen resolution.


3

I'll give you my perspective as an co-Editor-in-Chief and previously an Associate Editor of the ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (ACM TOMS): As Editor-in-Chief, I take a brief look at each paper and decide whether it even makes sense to move forward with it. I would say that between 10 and 20% of the papers are already filtered out at this stage: ...


2

This obviously depends a lot on the journal. I've never heard of an article being not being sent for review for (say) Classical and Quantum Gravity. But in the case of Physical Review Letters, rejections by the editorial desk are quite common, with the most commonly cited reason being the significance of the work is not clear (enough). For a good PRL ...


2

"Communicated" means the manuscript is submitted to a journal and is currently under review.


2

You can consider reaching out to the authors of the paper, and asking them if they can provide you personally with the code, since you want to use their work as a benchmark. Being used as a benchmark is a good thing, so the authors are quite likely to be happy about such a request. When I did my MSc thesis, code quality was not an evaluation criterion. I ...


2

I would say Yes, depending; Is it an interesting new type of vulnerability? Did you use an interesting new method to find it? Do you have interesting new insights about this kind of (already known) vulnerability, perhaps linking it to a different concept? Can you take the actions you took to find specific vulnerabilities in specific cases, and generalize ...


2

What is right and what is commonly done can be quite different. Both depend somewhat on the field and maybe other things. If a group of authors is large, then a seemingly small change might have a big impact on who is judged first. You can, and probably should, talk to the PI and ask for the reasoning. You may not be happy with the reasons given, but if ...


2

Yes. Preprints are preprints. They're preliminary versions. It's not surprising if the preprint differs from the version that's submitted to a journal. Author orders can even switch during revisions, during publication, etc. You also ask about the first author "defending" himself/herself against this, which implies you think the order switch is unethical. ...


2

If you had chosen "yes", then presumably the editorial management system would give you some options that eventually return your submission to the original editor who was handling it, who would see that they'd asked you to indicate ORCID IDs and you've done so. If you chose "no", this wouldn't happen and they would treat it as a fresh submission, which might ...


1

See the article on open access on Wikipedia for what it is. You can find open access journals in the Directory of Open Acces Journals, the Free Journal Network, and by searching the websites of the publishers who are members of OASPA. That said, I'm honestly rather surprised that your supervisor doesn't simply suggest a journal to publish in. Directly ...


1

You can find information about open access publishing in various online places such as the wikipedia article linked here. Note the section on funding, however. Since readers of open access materials can do so without charge, the costs must be covered by other means. Often this means that the authors are charged a fee for publishing. Perhaps your advisor ...


1

Often the journal submission system will have something like the following: When the administrative staff send it back to you, your manuscript will usually show up in "submission sent back to author". Thus usually, you would edit this version of your submission. This generally avoids the issue of getting a new submission ID. One minor procedural issue ...


1

Unfortunately, arXiv's internal search is not smart enough to consider search queries with and without diacritic equivalent. Searching for "Čech complex" on arXiv's paper titles provides 11 results, all with the diacritical on the PDF. Searching for "Cech complex" (without the diacritical) provides 7 results, all of which do have the diacritical on the PDF....


1

It's certainly not the case that "you can't submit garbage" to PRL. In fact I'd wager that the more prestigious a journal, the more garbage they receive. From the author's perspective, it doesn't cost them anything (except time) to submit, and the worst that can happen is a desk rejection, so why not. The review process starts immediately. If the associate ...


1

To make it clear to the editor, formally withdraw it from consideration. Then it is yours to do with as you please. They have no hold over you or the paper until you formally sign copyright away. What you have sent is likely enough, actually, but a formal notice of withdrawal leaves no ambiguity. In most places I think that giving notice is enough and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible