92

Speaking as an associate editor of a US-based journal that receives many international submissions, I can tell you that: There are absolutely no guidelines or even informal suggestions that any paper should be handled differently based on the nationality of the authors or their institutions. I have never heard of anyone making editorial decisions on such a ...


55

Yes, it is a plus, and yes, you can add it to your CV. But it is (and should be) just one thing among many. It, alone, won't get you a job or a promotion, but it adds to the list of things that are positive about your contributions. The academic value will be positive, but small. The paper is more important, of course. The image might induce a few more ...


30

It's unlikely. See this question from 2013. If you're an employee of the Iranian government then US editors and reviewers can't handle your papers, but even in this case it's overwhelmingly probable that the editorial board will have non-US members who can. It also seems unlikely this is what's happening in your case, since if they are rejecting your paper ...


17

I supposed that is because of sanction (we are Iranian). Is this likely to be the case? It's unlikely. Most good journals receive many submissions, more than they can plausibly even review. Hence, journals employ a pre-filtering process, where the Editor-in-Chief or an Associate Editor screens the paper and then decides whether the paper at least looks like ...


13

Assuming by "data mining" what they really mean is "continually testing hypotheses until you find something significant"... See: https://stats.stackexchange.com/questions/310119/why-does-collecting-data-until-finding-a-significant-result-increase-type-i-erro or a comic depicting the same issue: https://xkcd.com/882/ Basically, when we perform a ...


10

Within the last two years, I have been involved in the revision of several papers (for IEEE & ACES publications) that had affiliations with Iranian universities. The review process (from the point of view of a reviewer) did not differ in any way from any regular paper, as well as the final result. In that regard, I am unaware of such sanctions ...


9

This is a very important issue that some researchers in Iran have dealt with. I would like to share here my own experience and knowledge on this. I remember that last year I was at a conference in Europe with an Iranian colleague of mine, who is a full professor in Iran (University of Tehran). He told me that recently they have a problem with the submission ...


5

US sanctions against Iran concern specific sectors of economy which does not include education in general. So as long as the paper is not directly related to government, arms / nuclear / petroleum industry, banking, international trade or insurance, and authors are not affiliated to a company which deals in those sectors, sanctions don't justify a rejection. ...


5

It depends on the journal. The journals I've been associated with have an online system that gives authors a certain deadline by which they have to submit a revised manuscript -- I suspect that the deadline is often set at 6 months. Authors are reminded of this deadline by an automated email a certain time before the deadline expires. Authors can ask for an ...


4

The answer to your question is the same as for 50% of the other questions on this website: Talk to your adviser. Find out what the hold-up is, how you can help, what other roles you could take on in the lab to free him from work that holds up his side of the collaboration. Communicate about what your issues are.


4

The reason to ask for code is that the journal cares about reproducibility and quality of the science. The language of the code does not matter much, and normally it does not matter if two languages are used. A journal also accepts papers that use both fluorescence and mass spectroscopy, and there is no reason why they would refuse the use of two programming ...


4

I think it is unlikely to be the case. Several times a year I receive emails from editors that essentially say "could you please take a quick look at this paper and recommend whether it should be reviewed or not?". I often reply right away, when it is clear that the paper is not a good fit (topic-wise, quality-wise) for the journal. I imagine that when the ...


4

If there's no response from the author(s), the manuscript becomes dormant. The status stays as "revise" indefinitely, until one day the journal decides to perform spring cleaning and remove all these dormant manuscripts from the system. An actively-curated journal might have automated systems where, if the revision is not received in the designated time (...


4

The publisher can take no steps toward publishing if they don't have the consent of the author(s). The paper would just sit in limbo until contact is made. I assume the editor will try to make repeated attempts to contact the author, but it may not happen immediately. I assume, here, that the author has not yet passed copyrights to the publisher, so they ...


3

Log in, go to your profile, click the "+" icon, and select "Add article manually". Then fill in the details and it will appear on your profile immediately. However you cannot upload a pdf to Google Scholar or anything like that. Google Scholar is not a repository. And the citations will only appear after the crawler finds it on the internet.


3

You've actually asked a very relevant question. Simplification and standardisation is indeed what everyone wants, but when the Asch effect tends to institutionalise everyone into a state of learned helplessness, the prevalent opinion will tend to stick to tradition. Moreover, we have a mandatory xkcd for standardisation. To answer your question, some of ...


2

Several reputable journals I am familiar with ask authors to submit cover images. Once they receive the cover images, they ask the authors to pay a fee for the image to appear on the cover. For people who know about this process, awareness that the authors may have paid a fee to appear on the cover decreases the prestige of appearing on the cover. People ...


2

I would answer all your questions one by one. Question 1:Is this journal a scopus journal? Answer: In order to know if it is indexed by Scopus you need to visit the website of the journal and check it. Usually journals provide that information in their homepage. Question 2: Is it a good journal for your thesis? Answer: It is impossible for an ...


1

It is what it says - a hybrid access journal. This means that it publishes both open access and traditional subscription-access articles. After your paper is accepted, they'll offer open access to you. If you say yes, you pay them $1950 and they make your paper open access. This means it's freely available to anyone who wants to read it, the copyright is ...


1

"Only" means that you don't have the ability to choose traditional vs Open Access until after acceptance.


1

I believe that if your paper were blocked because of sanctions, you would simply be told so, as there would be no reason to keep it secret. The type of letter you received is pretty typical of a journal that employs a two-stage review process. The first stage is to determine if it will be sent out to referees, and the second would be what we think about as ...


1

Several options: Split the paper into several parts, submit only the first part. Not every paper can be split up like that, but often they can. If you're not sure where to make the split since you're too invested in the "wholeness" of the paper - ask a colleague who has taken a look at it. It's the wrong venue for your paper - try someplace else. Perhaps a ...


1

For some conferences the Program Chair might respond to an email enquiry. In others, perhaps not. But there is no reason that you can't just submit your paper. If it is inappropriate in any way, you will be told as part of the review process. Don't waste people's time with something obviously off-topic, but otherwise just do it. If a PC does respond to ...


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