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15

Since you did not interview Corak and have no firsthand information on what he actually said, you must cite Younglai. If you had access to a reliable transcript of the interview, and verified there that Corak said what Younglai claims he said, then you can cite Corak.


13

To add to Allure's suggestion, I think it would be most appropriate to make a slightly longer citation like According to (Corak, reported in Younglai 2016) You stated that you didn't want to include both names, but I think it is more helpful to the reader that way. Additionally, the above citation tries to be not too wordy (compared to yours), as it is ...


12

No permission is needed to credit, cite or link to Project Gutenberg as the source of something you use. This applies even for commercial use. Firstly, I think you may have misunderstood this a bit. The text isn't saying you shouldn't cite Project Gutenberg; in fact, it's saying the opposite -- that you don't need permission to cite them. Project Gutenberg ...


10

Technically speaking, the answer to your question is that no, it's not common for a paper not to be indexed. MathSciNet indexes almost all reputable math journals. And I say almost because like all good mathematicians I don't want to make an unproved universal claim, but I don't have any example of a non-indexed reputable math journal in mind. What is ...


9

I don't think I'd call it inappropriate, exactly, but I don't think it is the best way to word it. Your use of the word "arguably" signals that the phrase "progress has been made" is subjective - and in particular, it's a subjective opinion coming from a source that is clearly not impartial (you). Also, "progress has been made" is vague and not very ...


8

When citing, you should include the document's author(s). For a thesis, that'll be a single author. You needn't name any other contributors, e.g., any supervisors.


6

I note that the Gutenberg version doesn't have page numbers so chapter is about all you can cite if you use it directly. I'll also note that the Gutenberg editions are sometimes taken from multiple editions of a work and that they modernize spellings for some works. This makes citation difficult when you need to be definitive. You are better off citing from ...


6

I'll assume the quotation marks were used in the advertisement. Since you represented the text as coming from the reference, and provided the reference, it's not plagiarism. That doesn't mean it's necessarily okay. If the purpose of the assignment was to practice writing advertisement text, then you didn't do that and didn't complete the assignment. If ...


3

If you absolutely must reference this, @6005's solution seems like the best approach. However, I suggest that you find a better source instead. The major purpose of citations is to direct the skeptical or curious reader to sources supporting an argument. Referencing a newspaper article where someone restates the idea doesn't serve that aim. The other major ...


2

Since the web isn't a permanent repository, either reference something that is, or give the date on which you access the web article as part of the reference. And in your example, give the URL at which you found the article, not just the title of the website. So, more like this: Hutchinson, L, 2016. 'The audacious rescue plan that might have saved space ...


2

If you can't find the source at all, you should choose a different image. You can't simply put a citation like: Image. Found on the internet, source unknown. Even though it would be nice to be able to do that, that defeats the purpose of having a citation at all, which is so that people can see where you got it. You might find the following questions ...


1

Assuming you want to be helpful to the readers (without regard for pleasing the authors of the cited articles), this depends on whether you are writing a guide to the literature, or merely explaining facts and results. A guide to the literature should include many sources, while saying something useful on these sources. An explanation of facts and results ...


1

I would probably follow roughly the following steps: Read the conference paper thoroughly, and decide how it relates to your paper. This part is regardless of the details of who published first; it is just a matter of knowing the facts, and clearly figuring out what their work is about, how it overlaps with yours, and to what extent the results are the same ...


1

Great question! Among other challenges, citing this book is not easy because it is part of a series, and the publisher's name is very similar to the series name. Publisher: Hutchinson & Co. Series: Hutchinson University Library (Philosophy) Series editor: H. J. Paton I prefer the Chicago Manual of Style, 17th ed. (2017) (hereafter, Chicago), Notes ...


1

Disclosure: I work at SerpApi. You can use google-search-results package to extract data from Google Scholar citations. Check a demo at Repl.it. from serpapi.google_search_results import GoogleSearchResults from more_itertools import first_true client = GoogleSearchResults({ "engine": "google_scholar", "q": "coffee", }) data = client.get_dict() ...


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