5

Assuming they have a public scholar profile, I imagine the closest thing you can get is the number of citations the person has at the end of a given year. You can float over a given year to determine citations per year and then subtract the required years from "all citations". This will provide a cumulative total for a given year. For instance, ...


5

As to 2020, Numpy now has a Nature paper https://numpy.org/citing-numpy/ @Article{ harris2020array, title = {Array programming with {NumPy}}, author = {Charles R. Harris and K. Jarrod Millman and St{'{e}}fan J. van der Walt and Ralf Gommers and Pauli Virtanen and David Cournapeau and Eric Wieser and ...


4

It may not entirely apply to OP's question, but the study Dion et al.: "Gendered Citation Patterns across Political Science and Social Science Methodology Fields" reveals that there may, indeed, be subtle biases in which papers get considered foundational or central, and therefore garner more citations. As the other answers noted, self-promoting, ...


4

Plagiarism is not about whether your work passes some % threshold on software that detects plagiarism. Plagiarism is the representation of words and knowledge/ideas as your own. When you learn from a source, you need to cite that source when you write about it. Over time, some knowledge becomes so commonly known that it doesn't need to be cited any more in ...


3

You are being a bit inconsistent here. The reason for the introduction is that readers may not know the background. It would be good for them to see some sources that will fill them in beyond what you say. Mentioning a standard text or similar might be enough. You also have risk with the reviewer if you don't yield to them. They may have a lot of control ...


3

It's not clear what field these assignments are in, but as a second-year undergraduate, learning how to cite properly is a reasonable educational goal. I would advise you to review the syllabus and/or assignment guidelines to see if an expectation for citations was written out. For example, I have had assignments where it was OK to cite things as "(...


3

Yes, you can use Altmetric's API to do that. The URL is https://api.altmetric.com/v1/doi/ + DOI. For example: https://api.altmetric.com/v1/doi/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2020.102194. However, the API is designed to be machine-readable (and not primarily human-readable), so you will only see a (possibly confusing) JSON-document which you may want to "beautify&...


2

Can a reference be over-cited? Assuming you are using in-text citation, it is necessary to cite the reference in-text every time you use information from it. So, there is no upper limit on the number of times a reference should be cited. Increase the number of citations until there is no ambiguity, and then stop. 40 times is not that many. In most styles ...


2

Going to frame challenge a bit here...the situation you describe in your question doesn't really fit together with the problem you're experiencing. Either you refer to things "common knowledge" - in that case, really not much need to cite but also no reason to put in your paper as its own section, or you refer to things "not common knowledge&...


2

Cite repeatedly from the Encyclopedia of Machine Learning, available here: https://link.springer.com/referencework/10.1007/978-0-387-30164-8 It's a reference work, where many famous people in the field explained core ML concepts in an accessible way. Cite whatever lemma you need for whatever concept you introduce. The confusion matrix is definitely in there. ...


1

Assuming the figure is not directly related to the citation, I would be looking to rewrite the sentence to separate the citation and the figure reference. It seems unusual that you would be introducing what is typically your own work (i.e., a figure) and citing a reference at exactly the same point. For example, you could write something like : Figure 1 ...


1

Yes, it is. When you omit the citation, you are claiming the text as your own. Any time you use the words or ideas of another you need an in-text citation which points to a reference that has enough detail to allow others to find the source. If you are using the exact words, you also need quotation marks.


1

If you use someone else's work, academic honesty requires you to cite that work. Licenses and copyright are completely irrelevant. If you redistribute someone else's work, then the license is important. That is a matter of law, not academic honesty. The ArXiv license does not permit you to redistribute work unless you are ArXiv; attribution is irrelevant. ...


1

I don't have enough reputation to comment but we are all human and we make mistakes, you could ask your advisor about submitting an erratum but it is generally done only for peer-reviewed publications. Personally, I wouldn't worry too much about a typo in my citations. Unless the entire conclusions of a section really depended on the results from this ...


1

There is the Arxiv API that can be used for this purpose. You can read the documentation and programmatically make requests for the papers that you need, asking for the various fields as an output. You can send these requests as you want from the browser or any other programming language. In python for instance you can use urllib.request. Furthermore, ...


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