3

I would cite this as a book section, including the DOI (because that's where you found it/how others will be able to find it) but not including "date accessed", because that is intended for more volatile resources like web pages. (If a reference has a DOI you can usually treat it as non-volatile.) Sticking as precisely as you can to a reference ...


3

Citing in this case is unnecessary. An acknowledgement would be gracious, but also not strictly necessary. My personal inclination would be to do it if their explanation led to some insight on my part. But "Thanks to JDoe for their insights into Theorem 35 of Gauss", or whatever, is, as I say, gracious. It is even less necessary if the person's job ...


3

You can include an Acknowledgements section in which you thank the company for the data and the contest as appropriate. You can include, there, a link to the data, etc. It is probably unnecessary to even mention the scoring metric for purposes of citation. It is possible that the company wants it kept private if they haven't published it.


2

You can cite websites and documents (even private ones) in the usual way. You should acknowledge the organiser for posing the question that your algorithm addresses (since it isn't a contribution of yours). The score is valuable when presented with the scoring metric (since readers can presumably only verify the score using the metric). That poses a problem,...


1

Looks like you don't need any permission. See https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/


1

Update #0: Case Study: Logistic Regression As an example, consider the origins of the logistic equation as a model for population growth. I came across "The origins of logistic regression" , Cramer 2002 on wikipedia in the context of machine learning. Cramer traces history back to the independent rediscovery of the equation by Pearl (Bio ...


1

Neither alternative is good or bad. I would put the citation first if the author or the history is important: Darwin [On the Origin of Species, 1859] argued that natural selection ... but the citation last if you just want to tell your reader where they can look to check your facts: Darwin's finches continue to evolve [J. Wiener, The Beak of the Finch, ...


1

In the bibliography, you can cite a manual as a publication, e.g., Intel (2016) Intel 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer's Manual: Instruction Set Reference, A-Z, Volume 2 (2A, 2B, 2C & 2D). In the main body, cite the relevant chapters, e.g., \cite[Chapter~3]{IntelManual}. Use the @manual tag in your BibTex file.


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