27

Simultaneous discovery of research ideas is an entirely normal occurrence in academic research. It happened to me several times over my career so far, and I’m just one guy — some versions of this happen to practically everyone who works in crowded, competitive research areas. I am confused what should I do now. What should you do? First of all, take a deep ...


12

For legal advice you can be certain of, check with someone appropriate at your school. Start with the chair of your department. That said, common academic practice says you can use the images as part of the teaching material you provide your students - properly acknowledged, of course. You may not be able to use them in something you publish.


12

So far, nothing in your question at all indicates they have indeed stolen your results. You can claim you came up with them earlier, but the history of science has had plenty of occasions where the same results were formulated independently with years, sometimes even decades or centuries (!) separating them. This seems the most likely conclusion. In general ...


5

It depends on what you mean. If you're asking about using the ideas or methods in the paper, see this question and maybe also this question. In case you're asking about using the actual paper itself (i.e. text, figures etc.), the first step would be to check the abstract page for the preprint rather than the pdf. In this case, it would be https://arxiv.org/...


3

Even if someone wanted to complain and/or sue (and they won't), this would almost surely fall under "fair use" (or equivalent in other countries). You are using a small portion of copyrighted work for teaching purposes, which is allowed - so you don't even need to mail all journals. On the other hand, "fair use" wouldn't apply if you ...


1

Your arXiv preprint shows that you had the idea first. Does the subsequent paper in J2 harm you in any way? You can still demonstrably claim credit for your work in subsequent papers, job applications, etc. Finding whether there was plagiarism or not, in addition to being difficult, would not be useful to you. It might be useful to your competitors' ...


1

Accepted Version is defined by IEEE as follows: "An accepted article is a version which has been revised by the author to incorporate review suggestions, and which has been accepted by IEEE for publication." What other steps are necessary for authors who would like to post their accepted articles? The following copyright notice must be displayed ...


1

Most journals will not explicitly prevent you from putting a revised version of X-1 on a web page of your choice (including arxiv.org) provided it meets some conditions. For example, you need to use a "generic" style (like article style) rather than the journal's style file which may be copyrighted. It may be possible for the journal which ...


1

About Fair Use: Fair use is a legal doctrine that promotes freedom of expression by permitting the unlicensed use of copyright-protected works in certain circumstances. Section 107 of the Copyright Act provides the statutory framework for determining whether something is a fair use and identifies certain types of uses—such as criticism, comment, news ...


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