Hot answers tagged

113

I think it's reasonable for you not to support these circumstances, but also no need for you to report/escalate the situation to compel some change in behavior. In your place I'd advise your students A) that you cannot help with installation of non-standard copies, and B) you can't be responsible if the non-standard software they use prevents them from ...


97

I suggest copy-and-pasting your entire review, after double-checking nothing has changed, i.e., your review is still current. You should make your position clear to the editor and I suggest opening with a statement such as: I reviewed this manuscript a week ago for another journal. The authors have not addressed my comments and my opinion remains unchanged: ....


38

Your experience does not match mine - Chinese researchers accept reviewer invitations just like everyone else. Statistics also indicate that Chinese researchers do perform peer review. As a group, they submit more articles than they review for (along with Indian & Iranian researchers) but they also perform more peer review than any other country's ...


35

Let me translate: I am an adjunct professor at a University for a course where the students have to use a certain software "X" during the course. For your course, Students must use the software. students who apparently have had issues in installing the (legally distributed) student version of X The software provided by you is not working. One ...


27

The fact is that institutional norms and expectations regarding teaching vs research for faculty vary widely. At my current institution, teaching is very important. At my previous institution, no one really cared. Basically, I would not voice this opinion in any strong way unless you want to make your life difficult. It would only work if the faculty member ...


19

I'll begin by quoting dodd's answer: "Internet in China is highly regulated and many usual Web sites are blocked there, say, youtube" and expand it by saying that even the sites that are not "blocked" (blocked sites include Google, Facebook, Twitter and their subsidiaries like Youtube, Gmail, Instagram, etc.) cam still be extremely slow ...


17

I will avoid the discussion about "fair work practices", which I find problematic for the reasons explored in the comments. Instead, I will address two questions that I think are at the heart of your question. Does the fact that you work long hours contribute to a "culture of overwork"? Arguably, no. Investing a certain amount of time ...


16

I'm thinking that "reprimand" may be the wrong idea here, and certainly in isn't your responsibility to police their behavior and report them to higher authority. You can, however, remind them of the responsibilities inherent in ethical and safe behavior and recommend that they not cross lines that an honest person wouldn't. I think that is the ...


16

Astronat made a great comment: No one wants to be part of a system they dislike, but that's not a reason to opt out of the system. It's a reason to change the system. Since people tend to have different working styles and personal lives, how could one expect a one-sized-fits-all approach to work-life balance? You can improve the system by working to ...


13

I would actually suggest not doing that. Send your comments to the editor rather than to the authors. But if you make the same points in your report, then it will be pretty obvious to the authors that they have hit the same reviewer again. And, as you say, the new journal has different standards.


12

Keep in mind that as a grad student you are not part of the permanent faculty. You are supposed to be there for a few years, get your degree, and leave. It is the responsibility of people like the Chair or Director of Graduate Studies to decide on these bigger issues. If it really bothers you, you could discuss with them, if you trust him/her. But if they ...


11

In my experience, when there is a situation like this, in which a low level student thinks they have found a fatal flaw in the analysis of a peer-reviewed technical paper, 95+% of the time the student has just made a mistake in their own analysis. If the student instantly believes the author of the paper is lying, without making inquiries about the ...


10

I dont think there is any particular academic practice or advice that can be offered to help you here. Whether or not you take action to report potentially unlawful behaviours (of two very different kinds) is a practical and ethical decision that will involve a lot of factors that are specific to your situation and your personal views. There is certainly ...


10

"Lying" is a very, very strong accusation. Maybe there are some details that you missed? Maybe the description just isn't complete? There are many possibilities here, and you cannot prematurely assume malicious intent. Of course you can contact the author, but you should state how you tried to reproduce the result and politely ask for clarification ...


9

What's the best way to approach this and tell the department about this? There is no magic incantation; the approach will be the same as for any other job. Tell them as soon as possible, thank them for all they've done for you, and emphasize that your decision is based on your evolving interests rather than any shortcomings of the individuals involved. See ...


8

I would state plainly the fact that you have previously reviewed this paper and your comments still stand. Of course, I don't know what your field of knowledge is, but in some journals it is actually expected from authors to have addressed comments from previous reviews even if they are from a different journal: Resubmission of Previously Rejected ...


8

I would like to know what would happen to me if I report it to the university after I graduate or if there is anything else I can do about this situation without ruining my future. Both your own actions and the actions of this other student would certainly amount to serious academic misconduct. It may also amount to some species of criminal fraud, such ...


8

I don't see a "culture of overwork" unique to academia. Ask a small business owner, a salesperson, professionals in industry, and so forth. What you'll find is that, like academia, there's a natural selection process always in the works, selecting those who are successful. And in that competition there are always those who are willing to work ...


8

I think that indeed one should not dismiss, as it has been in some answers, the fact that the overwork culture is perpetuated as much by the increasing pressures in academics as by the people actually overworking. It is important to keep this in mind not to misunderstand some fundamental equilibriums. For example, some user spoke about "scarce research ...


7

How should I proceed? I am inclined towards reprimanding the students (privately). Note: this is not a question about the ethics of software piracy or of flouting social distancing regulations, but about the proper response to illicit behavior (which I have not personally witnessed) that happens off-campus. The ethics of this behaviour should be a key part ...


7

Agreed on all the answers above about the incentive for not making waves, and that any effective approach will create more work for you. It's probably in your best interest professionally to ignore these problems, do what you can to help the students you have access to, and spread information invisibly about highly dysfunctional people/classes to avoid, ...


7

The head author’s insistence that you contributed is irrelevant. One simply cannot make someone a coauthor without their consent. I suggest that you reply to the chain of emails with something along the following lines: Dear [ACM editors], Thank you for your assistance with the issue of the coauthorship of [paper]. My colleague [head author], cc’ed, is ...


7

It seems that one of your main concern is that you keep thinking about your research outside typical "business hours". Just to give you a different perspective: not all jobs outside academia are the type of 9am-5pm, where you finish the work at specific time and immediately cut off mentally from it. Consider a few examples: entrepreneurs - most (...


6

There may be a much larger issue at stake. Simultaneous submissions are considered unethical for a series of reasons, the striking one because they lead to a waste of resources/workforce/brainwork. Imagine the new submission was addressed by a different reviewer than you. Then there will be effectively at least 2 reviewers (you and the new one) plus two ...


6

Those that dedicate themselves to their career will do better than those that don't. This is beyond your control: You cannot meaningfully influence the masses dedicating themselves to their careers,* nor the masses that don't. You're just one person, I don't think: [your] willingness to research in this way helps to reinforce a lot troublesome aspects of ...


6

Professional boxers, even though they are in a physically very demanding and rough line of work, take great pains to care for their fists. Folklore says that traditional kettlebell athletes (who are generally the stereotypical 'tough' guys) have elaborate palm moisturizing routines. Its because they realize that hands are necessary for their sustenance. For ...


5

Yes, you can become a professor. Your expulsion (for unsatisfactory marks) seems equivalent to failing your degree. Failing a degree doesn't preclude becoming professor. But you'll (likely) need a degree to become one. (The definition of professor varies between countries.) From comments: [is] failing a degree...dishonourable...something [to] be ashamed of? ...


5

While I sympathize with your concerns, let me give some background, and possibly a solution. First, a good student exercise that leads to insight is an extremely valuable thing. Text book authors often will vet their exercises with real students to assure that they lead the faithful student to the right conclusions, and preferably to insight. In some of my ...


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