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38

I have to side with your professor here. You did not have a private phone conversation. You had a simulated conversation with a person you knew to be a fake client with the purpose of evaluating your skill. If the professor listens in to the conversation that means he will evaluate you himself instead of relying on the person he got to play the potential ...


33

Regulation No, you cannot skip all the process. The word "exempt" is misleading. The exemption is from most regulatory requirements, not institutional or journal requirements. Exemption is specific to the regulations of the United States. Regulations do not require IRB review of exempt research. Regulations do require determination. Depending on your ...


11

You don't need to ask permission for your ongoing work. It is entirely appropriate to extend what you have done and publish it. You should be sure to cite the older work as needed to avoid questions of self-plagiarism, of course. An acknowledgement of your advisor for their past help is a good and appropriate thing to do, but not necessarily required. I ...


9

(My personal take on this matter - which is only based on intuition/opinion rather than experience): When you're about to publish such a paper, ask yourself: "How certain am I that the deceased would have put their name on the paper?" If the answer is "certain", go ahead and name them a co-author. But - explain that the attribution is posthumous, both in a ...


7

If you did it on your own, you can and should publish it as sole author.


6

See note and caveat at the end. I suggest that you have a retraction done. You didn't participate directly in the preparation of the offending paper, so adding you as an author is a bit fishy. Moreover, adding you would connect you to people who seem to have no ethical boundaries. I'd guess that you don't want that association. If the retraction is issued,...


5

Usual disclaimer: I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. Several things to consider here: It is the university's responsibility to maintain their computers, including their contents. So if your friends have been using a computer provided by the university with cracked software on them, the vendor of the software will go after the university first. ...


5

In addition to the advice being offered to retract (rather than correct) the journal article, I suggest that you contact the officials at the university where you did the thesis. I imagine that the legal office at the university will be especially interested to learn about violations of copyright by their faculty. Should such information become "public ...


3

Because of the situation, normal (legal) rules do not apply to this, no matter what State you're in. At all. This call, in no way, would be considered a private call, and the instructor has every right to listen-in, whether you've been notified or not. If you inform the dept. Chair he/she will tell you the same.


3

I doubt that this is a case of a student "offending" an individual professor and more one of rules in place that may not make sense and that you may not approve of, but still, rules. I don't like, personally, such rules. I think they are wrong, but an individual professor has little actual control over rule making. They may not be willing to break the ...


3

By my understanding:* You've presented some work-in-progress at a workshop, without proceedings. You have a conference paper accepted and you've been invited to make some minor revisions. The workshop presentation is built upon data used by the conference paper, but the methodologies are different. The workshop presentation drew a conclusion that you're ...


3

If you've had to go through ethics approval process, you are bound by the protocols that you come up with them. We've carried out interviews with other academics and are bound by ethics, and when I have been interviewed by other academics, I have gone through the ethics process. I would be skeptical if somebody was carrying out a research interview with me ...


3

I think it's quite a leap to jump from the fact that there is no such statement to the conclusion that it has not been reviewed. You should ask for clarification on that point in your review, rather than outright rejecting it. Also, there are different rules in different countries, and the notion of an IRB might not exist, or the procedure may go by a ...


3

This is bizarre and unorthodox to say the least. It also raises some pretty serious legal issues. Specifically, if you live in one of the eleven “two-party consent states”, what the instructor did was illegal. According to this article (emphasis added): In the context of recording conversations, the states in our country are divided as either “one party ...


2

As it was suggested to me to post this in the form of an answer as well, here is my thinking about this again: My reasoning behind not needing to provide references is: 1) Lecture slides do not purport to be an original piece of scholarship. Therefore, the rules for referencing are also not the same. 2) From my experience as a student and junior colleague,...


2

You should certainly cite your sources. Not for each and every use, a general statement like "Based on textbook and others" on your first slide (or slide of each class) should be enough. Add references to slides/classes as needed for people who want to dig deeper.


2

I have talked to the data protection officer of my university, who seemed very sensitive with regards to my concerns. So in fact, the university officially allows a small amount of private usage of computers - without explicity defining small amount. There also is a policy for emergency cases, where the head of the instite is not allowed to simply access the ...


2

My question is: is it out-of-line for me to contact one of my colleagues on the hiring committee, explain the situation, and ask about the status of my partner’s application? This is definitely out-of-line --- any contact with the hiring committee to attempt to influence them in favour of hiring your partner is contrary to the assurances that universities ...


2

I seriously doubt that it matters, but you might want to develop the story with your new colleagues at some point. The story is interesting, not terrible. It is a bit unusual, that is all. In fact, it is in a lot of ways the most honest answer rather than the most bureaucratic answer. Relax. Develop a nice story and become a legend.


1

I'll need to deal with the inevitable peer negativity and rumor mill that'll spring up. You must work in a really bitchy department if you get peer negativity and rumors just for wanting to pursue an alternative career path. In a well-functioning department, we wish departing staff all the best, and thank them for their service. In any case, whether or ...


1

Your first step should be to contact the editor with your concerns. It may be that the research falls under one of the exceptions for which IRB approval is not needed. See, www.eandireview.com, for example, though there are others. Both NHS and NIH list some exceptions. However, even if an exception applies but you think that the research was, in fact, ...


1

I understand your situation as I had gone through the exact same thing. Am sorry that it happened. Anyway based on my experience I would suggest you need to assess the extent of copying based on that you need to first try contacting the authors(if you want to maintain the relation request for the addition of your name give them time and wait for the reply). ...


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