New answers tagged

0

This is fine. The only exceptions would be for identifiable data which would be covered by responsible conduct of research. You should take that training if you have not already in order to make sure you do not run afoul of the institutional IRB.


1

This is a question (or series of questions) for the editor. You can ask what they intend to do beyond taking down the online version. Ask if you can provide a correction (assuming that is possible). Ask if there is anything else you can do. And an email "yesterday" won't get a response for a while. But look for some mutually acceptable outcome. I ...


3

When referring to a preprint being replaced, it is understood that a new version will be generated. Most/all preprint servers do not generally permit editing existing versions in order to maintain a clear timeline. Even though older versions remain accessible, readers would view the latest version as the most up-to-date version to refer to for future use, so ...


-1

In and of itself, the only advantage to giving up any part of your copyright would be altruism; virtue signalling, if you must. Of course it's true that publishers and agents have more resources available for defending copyright and so what? All decent publishers, agents, etc, will be happy to negotiate terms for using their resources to defend your rights. ...


-3

Retaining the copyright as an individual is fairly meaningless. First, you can't afford to deal with copyright violations, and second, assigning the copyright to the journal won't prevent you from using the intellectual property of the paper in any way you like. On the other hand, if you are employed in industry (or a national lab, etc) and the work reported ...


33

To expand a little on user2768's answer, the text provided by the publisher normally explains the benefits and implications of the different options quite well. If you choose to retain your copyright, you are only giving the publisher permission to publish and sell your work, but all rights to your work remain with you. You are in principle free to give ...


7

given the option to still have the paper published while retaining the copyright, is there any reason to still transfer the copyright? There are benefits of a publisher holding the copyright, e.g., they can enforce copyright, whereas you likely cannot. When royalties are involved this is particularly useful. When they aren't, it can still be useful, e.g., ...


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