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67

Other responses talk about the law. However, if the paper, as I assume (after all this is academia.SE), is academic, there is another set of values that rule the matter, and that is defined by the academic rules for authorial attribution of scientific contributions; unlike patent or copyright ownership, they are not waived by working for a company. Moral ...


64

As an advisor, I regularly use my students’ slides when I present my current projects. This is usually done within the context of high level presentations: I’m working on important project X; Alice and I worked on X.a which resulted in such and such, and with Bob on X.b which resulted in so and so. Claire and I are working with Alice to extend to X.c. If ...


16

It's pretty common in my experience for advisors to present their students' work, with acknowledgement of the students' contributions. They'll often combine slides from several students' presentations into one talk for a conference, but they can also present just one student's work. In that case they usually say something like "The work I am going to talk ...


13

From your comments, you seem to be worried not only about not getting credit, which others have already addressed, but also about the originality of the presentation itself. Here you write: To be honest, I will feel much better If she create the presentation by herself.... What I feel uncomfortable is "she will present my entire presentation with my own ...


10

This will also depend on legislation. The particular IP rights of concern here are the so-called Moral rights which include the right to attribution. In some legislations (e.g. in continental Europe) the moral rights cannot be transferred or waived (only the rights for economic exploitation are transferred to the employer), while in others (e.g. US) this ...


9

I suggest three things. First remind him of your dissertation and send a link to it, noting that there is similar wording that might become an issue. Second, I would, under the stated circumstances, offer to help in the application. It seems like it might be an attempt to extend your work, rather than to plagiarize it. That is always appropriate. And you ...


9

One benefit of her giving your presentation is that she will be actively promoting your work. For example, my adviser presented my theoretical work 3 times at 3 different conferences, and found an experimental collaborator to show that my theories were correct. The more exposure your research gets, the higher the possibility for citations, which then leads ...


5

their excuse was that because I left the company, they could not put my name as a researcher for their institution and that the research belong to them. Other answers regarded the general question, I'll just say that this excuse is invalid: They can still be the owners of the IP even if you are recognized as the author - you simply transferred ownership. ...


5

In addition to @Captain Emacs' fine answer: An academic paper is inter alia a testimony by the authors that the facts and theses presented therein are correct and true to the best of the authors' knowledge. Centuries of experience has shown that the scientific method rigorously requires this personal accountability. Although the authors' names ...


5

Not all instances of plagiarism are equally severe. So, while your assessment that this is plagiarism may be correct, it looks like at most a fairly mild case of it. And it may not be plagiarism at all: you say the document being read was a “draft for an essay”. Well, drafts are understood to be incomplete works-in-progress, so having some missing citations ...


4

Others have already argued that this is not OK, but probably you are asking yourself what to do now. You haven't insisted enough with the editor. Ask formally for retraction. Tell them the other parties refuse to collaborate and you cannot solve the issue with them. Present the editor all evidence you have, and especially put them in contact with the editor/...


4

What really matters here is what your goal is. Is your goal to: (A) cause there to be some sort of disciplinary action/reaction against this person; or (B) to make sure that your own name is not tarnished by association with this person in the future. If you are hoping for (A) I believe that you have answered your own question. It does not appear that any ...


4

The lack of acknowledgement and the sense of disrespect from your colleague and fellow PhD student seems to be the heart of the issue here. Your colleague may not realise that not acknowledging and situating your PhD is essential to the success of your grant. Grant reviewers will likely and should find your published PhD which sounds like much of the grant....


3

I would reply as a reviewer of the grant who knows about your work and is just reviewing the grant application. If this would be the case I think you would not have any doubt of giving the feedback required, i.e. the grant agreement cannot be submitted as it is now because of X, Y, Z, and the evidence is this, this and that, and you can suggest ways to ...


3

I can accuse my former supervisors of plagiarism, contacting the editor of the journal and proving that a very large portion of the paper is taken from my thesis, which is not cited. Although my thesis is not available online, the authors could have included it in the list of references, and I can prove that they have a copy of it; Yes, you can do that. ...


3

If I wanted to quote a joke from a website in verbatim in a formal academic essay, how would I do that? The same way you use text taken verbatim from any source.


2

This would probably depend on the contract you had with the company when you worked for them. It is possible that they do, indeed, own your IP for that period. Such contracts are actually pretty common. You may also have a non-disclosure agreement, preventing you from discussing your work there. But there may also be national or other laws that limit what ...


2

If I get your question, because I am not sure, you want to quote what XXX ref# said. This is done by "quoting". Else the reader interprets all the the text as your own, and the reference just a justification for it.


1

Reproducing a published study is good science. It isn't plagiarism as long as you properly cite the earlier work and don't copy from it. It is especially good science if you have any doubts about the conclusions of the earlier study or about its applicability in new circumstances. But, to be published yourself, you will need to be clear about why you are ...


1

Plagiarism is selling somebody else’s idea as your own. Therefore as long as you properly cite the other paper, you are in no danger of committing plagiarism. The worst that can happen is that you are reproducing an existing study¹ instead of doing something novel. Whether this is a problem, is for you and your supervisor to decide, as you know the ...


1

in case of publications and falsified data you are first and foremost responsible to report it to the publication. They need to first approve or review the technicality of the matter which can become material for the ethics committee. The Honor Committees of universities keep a record of students and faculties, and when students or professors apply to other ...


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