22

Yes, you can do this. You are not taking his ideas, you are using your own (note you wrote "I have a few ideas"). Basically, once a paper is published, all the ideas within becomes public knowledge and you are free to build on them. You should still cite the original paper if you are building on their ideas, but your extensions are yours and yours ...


17

Is re-using an idea from a research proposal considered as self-plagiarism? No: You can re-use ideas from research proposals which you haven't executed upon, i.e., ideas that you haven't advanced (e.g., because the research proposal was rejected or that part of the proposal was never addressed or ...), they're still fresh ideas.


9

If I understand this correctly, you were under the impression that proper quotation of sources means to have them in your bibliography (and nothing else). You then quoted from those sources without quotation marks and footnotes to the reference quoted. I’d explain that to them, apologize, and ask for a good source how, in the future, to quote according to ...


8

You seem to assume that the academic honesty rules at a university will always stipulate that dishonesty only counts as being against the rules if it occurs at that university. That is a dangerous supposition to make. Many universities have academic misconduct policies that refer broadly to collusion, cheating, and other forms of misconduct, without ...


7

The head author’s insistence that you contributed is irrelevant. One simply cannot make someone a coauthor without their consent. I suggest that you reply to the chain of emails with something along the following lines: Dear [ACM editors], Thank you for your assistance with the issue of the coauthorship of [paper]. My colleague [head author], cc’ed, is ...


4

For coursework, some professors have a stricter definition of plagiarism than is strictly necessary. But, from what you say, you have cited the original and if it is clear enough that your citation implies that the source of the ideas is elsewhere, then it isn't technically plagiarism. Note that whether you quote or paraphrase is irrelevant, assuming you ...


3

You can try using Sentence-Bert, original paper here: https://arxiv.org/abs/1908.10084 Github link here: https://github.com/UKPLab/sentence-transformers It is very easy to use since I had used that before and it took me just several minutes learning how to use it. The usage is fairly simple, you generate embedding for each assignment, and compare the cosine ...


3

There's nothing wrong with replicating a paper as long as you cite and credit it. If you pass it off as your original contribution, that's never okay, but science works by advancing on previous work and it's not expected for any work to be completely novel from top to bottom (nor is it desirable). If all you do is make some minor improvements on something ...


2

It is possible that A would face discipline if it became known, especially if everything became known to A's university. Academic dishonesty is independent of borders. There are no US laws for this, however. Honor codes don't have a "cross border" exception. And saying that "A did not violate any discipline of his university in the US" ...


2

It sounds like the way you did the reference was fine and perfectly standard practice in mathematics. And I doubt Turnitin is remotely useful for mathematics anyway. The more important question is whether what you did meets the expectations of your committee, and you'll have to ask them that.


1

You are assuming that TurnItIn makes a decision on plagiarism. It just finds sub-strings of a submission in other publications. Their existence might be indicative of plagiarism, but it is subject to human interpretation. I cannot guarantee that some instructor would not look beyond a TurnItIn score, but I with many other professors would not think such ...


1

This is ultimately up to the journal to decide - so you should contact them/consult their guidelines. I cannot imagine any scientific journal treating a thesis (PhD or MSc) as a prior publication, but this might be field dependent. In any case, you should explicitly write in your paper "This chapter is based on the author's PhD thesis to be defended (......


1

I'm still not sure that I understand the entire scenario, so this will be a bit hypothetical. If you write something but it isn't published in any form then, later, you can simply copy and publish any part of it without citation or further comment. It isn't self plagiarism to use your own unpublished work. Assignments in a course might, however, follow some ...


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