100

The best course is to just inform the editor that you are unable to perform/complete the review as it is outside your area of expertise. The title led you to think otherwise. You are sorry, but others are better qualified to judge and give advice. I don't see that as anything strange at all, and no one is likely to think less of you. What would be wrong ...


29

Having very briefly -- and foolishly -- been an editor, I wish all reviewers shared your concern of "going back on my word". Far too many not only don't deliver promised reviews, but do so passively-aggressively by just not saying or doing anything, leaving editors to chase them down. I also wish reviewers who discover they are not qualified, or for any ...


25

I think the main advantage is that an ambiguity of a/bc is avoided. For example, g/m^2s may be read as g m^{-2} s^{-1} or g m^{-2} s depending on whether multiplication takes priority over division. As far as I know, there is no consistency in opinions about it, so to avoid confusion a slightly uglier notation with negative powers may be worth accepting.


17

I fully agree with @Buffy's answer, but would like to a add two "middle-ground" possibilities. I as well as some colleagues have been in a similar situation in the sense that an important part of the paper turned out to be outside our respective expertise, while the reviewer was fine with reviewing most of the paper (as they concluded from title and ...


15

One point I have not seen raised here that I think you should pay attention to in the future: if you think the paper is not up to the journal's standards you should say so in your first referee report. Suggesting changes too would be a courtesy to the authors. Replying just with the list of changes and saving your reservations for later may cost the ...


7

First, share your concerns with the editors. The reviewers may not have realized the extent of the work. If they agree that a long paper is fine, then write the long paper. If they don't want to do that then consider breaking the work into two papers with one referencing the other. You could even submit them simultaneously to the same journal. But it would ...


6

What is the best course of action in this case? Ask for the full manuscript before agreeing to review. I don't believe such access is unfair (you needn't look too deep when deciding whether to agree), I do believe you've given something back (your consideration).


5

Having already read the paper, you might as well write a quick review on those points you can judge, and send it in along with a note to the editor saying you strongly recommend appointing another reviewer. As you are surely at least close to the subject at hand, you likely know a few names to propose to the editor as additional reviewers.


4

Publishing a paper omitting the main contributor is plagiarism, as well as an ethical violation. Publishing an already-published paper isn't plagiarism (assuming the original authors haven't changed), but it almost surely violates a journal's originality policies. Both will likely lead to retraction. The first will require hard proof, but the second shouldn'...


3

Generally speaking, the choice of one form over another is better done on a case-by-case basis, according to readability. If I have to specify a speed of 5 meters per second, I'll write v = 5 m/s rather than v = 5 m·s-1, because for most people the first form is more readable than the latter. However, if I have to label the axis of a quantity with some ...


3

No, do not list the journal you submitted it to. Frankly, it means nothing: anyone can submit anything to any journal. Of course, you want to your CV to accurately reflect how much work you've been doing lately, but there's always a chance that the paper gets rejected in the in-between phase. A good enough compromise is to just post the arXiv info, when ...


3

Two important things to consider... A) It's up to the company. If they approve, then you can possibly write it up. If they disapprove, you cannot. B) Human subjects research must be conducted under proper ethical controls - some sort of institutional review board has to approve of your human subjects research ahead of time, or certify that your research ...


3

I'll give you my perspective as an co-Editor-in-Chief and previously an Associate Editor of the ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (ACM TOMS): As Editor-in-Chief, I take a brief look at each paper and decide whether it even makes sense to move forward with it. I would say that between 10 and 20% of the papers are already filtered out at this stage: ...


2

Writing a review paper gives you several opportunities. Especially when it is invited an published in a renown journal in your field. But the purpose can not be to use or optimize towards a funding proposal. A review paper should serve your community and especially new researchers in the field. The chances I see are: doing a complete review of the ...


2

This obviously depends a lot on the journal. I've never heard of an article being not being sent for review for (say) Classical and Quantum Gravity. But in the case of Physical Review Letters, rejections by the editorial desk are quite common, with the most commonly cited reason being the significance of the work is not clear (enough). For a good PRL ...


2

My suggestion for your name would be: whatever you come up with, do a couple of google searches first to find out if it is sort of unique. If there are, for example, already a couple of Elizabeth Duncans active in some other area of science, it might be worth thinking about an alternative spelling of your name (or even Lizzy Duncan) just so that it is ...


2

In terms of “standard” conventions, I would suggest: Elizabeth G. Duncan, Department of Statistics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University If the research you’ll be publishing was conducted as part of a research group, however, you might list that affiliation instead, e.g., “Applied Statistics Lab, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State ...


2

First, many journals these days allow for "supplementary information", which does not go in the main paper, but is available for download at the journal's website for interested readers. You could add a brief summary of the new content to the main paper (say a page) and then refer the reader to the supplementary information section if they want all the ...


2

As you point out, you've waited close to a year. You shouldn't feel bad about asking for updates after this long, especially since it's been two months since you last checked. In your email I'd point out that it's been almost a year since you resubmitted, and you're wondering what exactly is happening. When can you expect a decision? If they can't predict ...


1

See the article on open access on Wikipedia for what it is. You can find open access journals in the Directory of Open Acces Journals, the Free Journal Network, and by searching the websites of the publishers who are members of OASPA. That said, I'm honestly rather surprised that your supervisor doesn't simply suggest a journal to publish in. Directly ...


1

You can find information about open access publishing in various online places such as the wikipedia article linked here. Note the section on funding, however. Since readers of open access materials can do so without charge, the costs must be covered by other means. Often this means that the authors are charged a fee for publishing. Perhaps your advisor ...


1

In general you should always cite work you have previously done when you use it. If you don't, you open yourself to a charge of self-plagiarism. The reason for citation is that a reader may need to go back to earlier work to get a full picture. The earlier work included context that is likely missing in the current work, such as the references you used, ...


1

It's certainly not the case that "you can't submit garbage" to PRL. In fact I'd wager that the more prestigious a journal, the more garbage they receive. From the author's perspective, it doesn't cost them anything (except time) to submit, and the worst that can happen is a desk rejection, so why not. The review process starts immediately. If the associate ...


1

Impact factors can be very misleading. Journals in chemistry or material sciences have in general higher IF than physical sciences, simply because the community, amount of academic research topics, industrial research, researchers and engineer is much higher. So more people read such journals, although the truly higher impact research is likely achieved and ...


1

Let me suggest that the IF of the journal overall is less important to you than having your paper seen by the people who need to see it. I assume you are interested in citations of your work. You won't get them if the people in your field don't have ready access to your paper. I think that a specific journal is a (valuable) benefit to you, independent of ...


1

I would say: your name, your choice. Consider creating an ORCID which is unique. In case you feel like adapting your publication name, this ID remains the same. As to the affiliation: usually there are guidelines by the instition. Ask your advisor and consider the affiliation they are using in publications.


1

Many journals offer an "early access" or "preprint" service, in which articles are made available online directly after final acceptance but before copy-editing and typesetting (i.e., before adaptation of the article to the journal's format and paper print requirements). The date of publication is the date when the article is first made available online. ...


1

To make it clear to the editor, formally withdraw it from consideration. Then it is yours to do with as you please. They have no hold over you or the paper until you formally sign copyright away. What you have sent is likely enough, actually, but a formal notice of withdrawal leaves no ambiguity. In most places I think that giving notice is enough and ...


1

Another significant advantage of using negative powers to me is that checking for correctness of units becomes easier. In physics especially, any physically meaningful formula or identity should have units which match up on both sides, so if the units not match up for an equation, this can be an effective check that the equation can't possibly be correct. ...


1

Dimitry's answer is probably the most complete, but for me, the issue is around ambiguity in fractions. For example I would never write a/bc, because it is ambiguous, I would right (in LaTeX) \frac{a}{bc} or ab^{-1}c^{-1}. The former I find much neater for an equation out in the open, while the later looks a bit better if included in-line text.


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