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16

I wonder if your research is ready for prime time. Not getting consistent results and not knowing why is a fault. Maybe you should continue work for a bit. But for the question itself, it is better that any shortcomings come from you rather than from someone else. At a minimum, you have an interesting "future research" section to write. Maybe you should ...


7

That may be something to add in a "further work" section as part of the conclusion.


4

Firstly, talk with your supervisor/professor. Likely it need not be included since you mention it won't add any value to the reader, and this is an important argument. Remember that a thesis needs to read as one piece (not as a concatenation of papers). If it is already sufficiently complete, it does not need to be included. Only if it builds on your thesis'...


3

Including incomplete work is risky: An examiner may find fault with negative consequences, omit your unfinished results. I deliberately kept some very recent work out of it because I thought it won't add any value to the reader...Now I am tempted to include this exploratory work...since I've put quite a lot of time on it. You don't believe your recent ...


2

My advisor always said, "The best thesis is the one on the shelf." To expand on @SolarMike's answer: "Future Work" may be a good spot for it, but also, be careful. If the core of your thesis is solid (and done!) then focus on refining and finishing that. It's better for your thesis to be a bit shorter but pack a punch, than to have a longer one where you ...


2

Should I 'admit' a weakness of a paper even if it's 'obvious'? Yes, as per Buffy's answer. Delving deeper: You discovered...different data-sets...can behave radically different[ly and unpredictably]. You acknowledge this is a major weakness of the paper. So, a better title might be "Should I 'admit' a major weakness of a paper even if it's 'obvious'?" ...


2

Example: I have a simulation to run that requires social media data-sets. The data-sets that actually matter are too big to be able to simulate anything useful on. Instead, I picked a data-set that's much smaller that had similar properties and I (hoped) would therefor have similar behavior. One thing I discovered was that different data-sets, even when ...


2

From the SAGE link you provide: Conference abstracts, posters and presentations Subject to the journal's policy, manuscripts based on papers that have been presented at conferences may be considered for publication as long as they have not been published and provided that you still retain the rights to the manuscript. The journal editor may review ...


1

It depends. What do your readers need to know to appreciate the main result of your paper? If your paper builds on the ideas of others, these ideas must be stated (included explicitly) and accompanied by a citation. If you simply note in passing that there are other relevant ideas, reference may be enough. Having said that, as a reviewer, I will question ...


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