Hot answers tagged

168

Do not do this. Those of us who prefer to read on paper and have black and white printers will be extremely confused.


64

(Personal opinions, so a fully anecdotal answer, but too long for a comment.) My immediate thought when seeing that screenshot was "wait, aren't those red and green ones the same variable?" (Obviously, I don't know the Schrödinger equations.) I automatically expected that of course you meant to use color only for emphasis, while still keeping the &...


53

The purpose of the related section is to establish context, within which your work is to exist, and against which it represents an advance. That context is highly individual-specific, and varies greatly even across researchers working in the same field. It is unlikely that any two researchers will have exactly the same knowledge, context and approach to a ...


35

The obvious problem, as noted in another answer, is monochrome (black) printers. Yes, you can get a color printer for very little money (not much more than the cost of the ink cartridges), monochrome printers are still far more common for those who need to print a moderate amount (hundreds to thousands of pages per month) because the cheap color printers ...


32

The process of paper writing is intended to communicate our [results] to a peer. No, not to a peer. To a wider audience than your peers. Which is why you are expected to provide some context. Also, a "related work" section helps both your peers and other readers clearly identify the novelty in your results: "Smith & al. formulated a ...


22

There are plenty. The Soviet Union was a scientific powerhouse, after all. Some quick names are Andre Geim, Andrei Linde, and Alexei Starobinsky.


21

It doesn't really matter. Pick the option you prefer, and then the important thing is to be consistent throughout the whole paper.


20

If you published a paper with an algorithm substantially improving performance on the traveling salesperson problem, I'd be really interested in that paper myself. I know next to nothing about the state of the field there, though. Related work would be very important for me. These days there are so many papers published that it's difficult to keep up with ...


17

Not many academics are really well known outside academia, but of Nobel laureates who are Japanese citizens, it looks like the most recent eight were all educated in Japan up to doctoral level. It might be more than eight but I stopped checking. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Japanese_Nobel_laureates


12

Yuri Oganessian appears to be educated solely in Moscow. He has been among the lead physicists in superheavy elements for half a century. The discoveries of six heaviest elements is credited to him. He is also one of only two people after whom a chemical element has been named during their lifetime and the only one still living. Unfourtunately, he might not ...


10

If you are trying to publish in a journal which has printed issues, you will (at best) eventually run into the problem that these (even ones which normally have no publication charge, which is pretty much all the ones in my field) typically impose a significant charge for every page which needs to appear in colour. Normally that might just be one page with a ...


9

Aleksander Wolszczan Polish astronomer, co-discoverer of the first confirmed extrasolar planets. I am only considering scholars who published at least one well-read text in English after the year 2000 His key publication in Nature was in 1994 but he published afterwards as well (notably in 2007). Not sure how this fits your constraints. Please note that ...


8

Since your profile avatar mentions physics as an interest of you, I assume you either possess, or know someone with working knowledge of LaTeX. (If not yet, learnlatex.org is an entry, and tex.stackexchange worth a subscription.) If so, you may consider underbraces, e.g. which define the terms contributing to the global function in mind. In the paper/...


8

Capitalisation where you wouldn’t expect it orthographically is irritating and breaks the reading flow, so I would avoid it whenever possible. Rarely, it can be helpful to clarify where your acronym comes from by typographically emphasising the respective letters, but capitalisation is no common emphasis (except for all caps, but that doesn’t work here). ...


5

From my point of view it has to do with availability. Science is supposed to be a accessible to each and everyone, not only to an elite group that already knows all the background and details of your work. While the main audience of your paper is people working on the same or related subjects, a more broader audience should principally not be excluded from ...


5

You should not "get away with" anything while trying to publish your work. You comply with the rules/guidelines, and everyone will be happy. Less headache for everyone (you, the editor, the publisher, the readers) - there's already a lot of headache in publishing a paper. "Could I use color...", yes you could, in theory, depending on the ...


5

While other answers already noted that the related work section is targeted at an audience much broader than peers in your field of study, I also want to note that the related work section could be essential for peers with "average knowledge in your field" as well. At times, it happens that a specific problem in field A is best solved via ...


4

Dark mode is not set by the author, it is set by the reader. That makes the question kind of moot - you can use whatever floats your boat to prepare your paper, and the reader can use whatever floats their boat to read your paper.


4

As mentioned by others, there is no definitive rule (except if defined by the journal). However, let me give you a reason for and against capitalization. On the one hand, capitalization makes it clearer and easier to see what the acronym stands for. Especially if the acronym is long or uses multiple letters from the same word, capitalization can be useful. ...


4

If your critical position paper would be considered controversial by anyone (anyone!) it might be a mistake to use that. You don't want to be upsetting people you don't know, but have some influence over your future, at this point. A research paper is more pertinent to the evaluation of a doctoral application. But, it may be that one of them is much more &...


4

The problem with colors in an equation, is suppose I don't believe your calculations and want to re-derive the equations myself with pen and paper. Do I need now need to find a set of color pens to work with? and hope I don't pick up the wrong pen at the wrong time? Just make your readers lives easier and just use different symbols (or subscripts) for ...


4

As I mentioned in the comments, 23 items isn't that many, unless the items are very long. Here is how Hurley et al. (2006) introduces the 35-item Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire (it continues onto the next page): As you can see, it is typeset smaller in a sort of table. I am not sure why they repeated the scale 1 2 3 4 5 6 on each row, as it is ...


3

If it helps to convey meaning and the advantages outweigh the disadvantages mentioned in the other answers, do it. The answers make some good points about the usage in your example, but I honestly think that using color in equations is a good idea. Inventing new notation to declutter equations has certainly been done before. I think color could really help ...


3

my opinion in 2 parts: part1. bad since confusing even for non-colourblind. besides having to read the thingy as like 'red-x', 'green-x', what's hard is reproducing the equation like when we write the equation in our notes we'll write $(red-x)^2$? (as mentioned in a comment above this is the same with those cases where multiple fonts like mathfrak, mathscr, ...


3

Barring any specific guidelines from your field that would state otherwise, yes, you should capitalize the word "equation" when it is acting as a proper noun in your work. If you give a name to an equation, table, or figure, (such as "Equation 1," Figure 1," etc.) then it should be referenced with a capital letter because it is ...


3

As others have said, color is fine as an aid (so long as you select more sensible color combinations than dark-blue on black), but it is useless on its own Something I haven't noticed mentioned yet: if someone wants to quote or discuss your work, whether in speech or writing, they'd be unable to do so without circumlocutions like "the blue m". No ...


2

The second option (Table 5, Figure 6) is better than the first, but both are inferior to being a little more descriptive. Some examples: (1) Figure 6 shows that the ten most frequently reported disease X serotypes accounted for 50% of all disease X that were serotyped during 2020, further details of which are listed in Table 5. (2)The frequency of disease X ...


2

Existing answers make a lot of different points, but there’s an overarching summary point that I think hasn’t been highlighted: You’re approaching the question a bit wrong. Your main question shouldn’t be “Could I do this?” or “Would this reduce the chances of publication?” — it should be “Is this good scientific writing?” As other answers amply show, the ...


2

The general consensus is to not use colors. However, this also depends on the field. Some fields, particularly in computer science, have accepted the use of colors for sake of readability. The following does not only hold for papers, but also for presentations, since accessibility at conferences or workshops should also be considered. If you really want to ...


2

No, a painting is not a "text" but it is a "work". In particular a "creative work" and thus subject to copyright protections. The same is true of (some, at least) photographs and even graphs in a paper. A "text" is just one kind of "work" for purposes of copyright.


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