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47

The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read. ― Mark Twain Read a lot and remember. Write quotable quotes in a notebook if you feel you might be able to use them in the future.


28

“By necessity, by proclivity, and by delight, we all quote. In fact, it is as difficult to appropriate the thoughts of others as it is to invent.” —Ralph Waldo Emerson “I often quote myself. It adds spice to my conversation.” —George Bernard Shaw “A good quote is like the handle of the bicycle which has the power to take you onto the beautiful path of life....


16

...conceal all art and make whatever is done or said appear to be without effort and almost without any thought about it.-- Castiglione I guess people just know these quotes, because they read widely. Maybe I'm a bit cynical, but part of the allure of epigraphs is to show off one's rounded liberal education. So I don't think people actually spend much time ...


13

One strategy is to identify key words in your topic that are distinctive but can have multiple meanings, and search for uses of these words in sources that are nontechnical or in a different technical area. An approach like this is described in Section 22 of a terrific document and is much easier now than in those pre-WWW days: Don [Knuth] takes great ...


12

Yes: They help navigate the document. (Except if the conference forbids them, then no.)


8

The author knows these quotes; has seen them, or heard them, and collected them over the years. It seems to be "cheating" to have someone else find pithy quotes for you!


5

Background: what (general) information should the panel know to properly judge the project. For example: What has been done before? How does your project relate to this previous work? If your project is about disease X, what is this disease exactly? Significance is another word for "importance" or "impact". Why is the project important, ...


3

I remember reading a wonderful book on computer algorithms called Algorithmics, in which each chapter was prefixed with a Biblical quote — from a translation by the author’s father. That was a neat way to do it. The quotes were relevant to the chapter, but in a way that was not relevant to the original use. “Let us talk of trees” is one I remember. Beyond ...


2

It's generally accepted to use passive voice in scientific papers. This would turn the cited paragraph into: For the health belief model, four specific points were discovered (taken into consideration?): perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived benefits and perceived barriers. It was noticed people aren’t very open when talking about covid, ...


2

In principle you can use Markdown on Overleaf (tl;dr; with a few "wrapper" lines in LaTeX at the beginning and end, the body of the document can be in Markdown format), but the RMarkdown layer would be an extra challenge (that is, if you actually have R code embedded in your document). There is an interesting possibility here but it's unstable (I ...


1

This probably did mean the person was well read back in the day, but not so much today. Google "quotes about ___" where ___ is a generic word that pertains to your chapter and switch to image search. (Why image search? Because then you don't have to click into the results to see the quotes.) For example, "quotes about trees": From "...


1

For collaborative writing in Markdown, you could use Manubot. I don't think there is a good versioning system (which would be indispensable for efficient collaborations) with RMarkdown as of now.


1

If you considered others and chose one, then it would probably add to the value of your paper to explain the choice. If you rejected some for important reasons then others would benefit from that knowledge. But if you just chose randomly, then people will wonder if your work has sufficient value. And if you say nothing, they might wonder why. If you compared ...


1

The MLA Style Center now provides an answer to this very question: Indicate the sources of your data in a note beneath the table or figure. If that is too cumbersome, give the sources in an endnote placed in the text that introduces the table or figure.


1

Think of it as follows: you are a guide at a museum and show people around. You would say things like "Here we see an example of ..., from which we conclude that ...", which is perfectly fine. What would sound wrong is using 'I' in this way. You don't say "Here I see ..." because you the visitors are also seeing this with you and you ...


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