140 votes

What should I do when my accepted paper is subsequently rejected?

Check with the journal. Especially do this if the rejection email you received looks like an auto-generated email. No rational journal would act in such a way, so my gut feeling says there was a ...
Allure's user avatar
  • 128k
114 votes
Accepted

I got a paper to review from a journal that had rejected my earlier works, how to respond?

These two issues are separate: if they reject your paper without comments, that's where you have to complain. They did not do a good job, reputable or not, and you are entitled to an explanatory ...
Captain Emacs's user avatar
105 votes

Should I continue reviewing a paper after having discovered plagiarised content in it?

Don't bother with more analysis, there is no point, since the paper should be withdrawn or rejected because of the plagiarism (if it isn't decline further review for this journal). Write a brief ...
Walter's user avatar
  • 5,453
103 votes

What should I do when my accepted paper is subsequently rejected?

This is unacceptable. If this is a reputable journal, then you can make the point that they made you wait and the research results become stale, and that you have every right to expect them to honour ...
Captain Emacs's user avatar
73 votes
Accepted

Elsevier production team messed up my paper. What should I do?

You could try contacting the editor in chief of the journal to see if they could get the problem fixed. This worked for me when I had similar problems with a paper last year.
Brian Borchers's user avatar
68 votes

Review your own paper in Mathematics

It's absolutely not usual practice and a clear case of the editor in charge being asleep at the wheel. This should not be happening: An editor's job is to find impartial reviewers and asking an author ...
Wolfgang Bangerth's user avatar
68 votes

Why do some journal proofs insert dozens of typesetting mistakes?

Because they are incompetent. That's about it, really. But don't lump all publishers/journals as one - the typesetters for one journal might not be the same as that for another journal, even one ...
Allure's user avatar
  • 128k
60 votes

I got a paper to review from a journal that had rejected my earlier works, how to respond?

Is it weird that the journal is now thinking me capable of reviewing a manuscript? Not really. Almost all scientists have their papers rejected on a regular basis and if this disqualified them from ...
Wrzlprmft's user avatar
  • 61.2k
52 votes
Accepted

Should I withdraw my paper because review is taking too long?

Implicit in your question is the assumption "if I withdraw my paper I will be able to get it published elsewhere faster". Are you sure that will happen though? It's entirely possible you ...
Allure's user avatar
  • 128k
51 votes

Referee recommends paper rejection with no further comment - how to react?

Submit somewhere else. The accept/reject decision is made by the editor, based on the recommendations of the referee(s). In this case, the editor felt that the referee's opinion of unsuitability, ...
Nate Eldredge's user avatar
49 votes
Accepted

Why call it a "major" revision if the suggested changes are seemingly minor?

It varies by journal I'm sure but sometimes the line between "minor" and "major" revision is set by whether the reviewers wish to see the changes authors make in response to their comments before ...
Cape Code's user avatar
  • 27.1k
49 votes

Identity of a supposed anonymous referee revealed through "Description" of the report

If the review itself is not signed, it sounds like the unblinding was not deliberate. I would: Reply as if the review were anonymous Notify the editor in a separate, private message saying there may ...
Cameron Brick's user avatar
44 votes
Accepted

What does the publisher mean by “Manuscripts […] are not returned to the authors”?

Back in the Olden Days, to submit a paper you would mail a hard copy to them. This notice says that they will not mail it back to you; they will only send you a letter with their decision. But ...
GEdgar's user avatar
  • 18.4k
36 votes
Accepted

Advice needed – I can't reach my collaborator, but there's a short deadline for revising our journal article submission

(Promoted from a comment.) As well as agreeing with other posters that you might as well start working on revisions yourself, I would strongly suggest that you contact the editor now rather than ...
Ben Bolker's user avatar
  • 4,893
32 votes
Accepted

Should a graduate student accept random offer to be a reviewer for IEEE Transactions paper?

It is probably a good thing to do, just for the experience. It will also get you on the good side of the professor. However, make sure, in accepting, that the professor and others know that you ...
Buffy's user avatar
  • 365k
31 votes

Why call it a "major" revision if the suggested changes are seemingly minor?

Just make the required changes and send the paper back to the editor. Don't worry about what it's called – it makes no difference to your situation whether it's called a major revision, a ...
David Richerby's user avatar
30 votes

Elsevier production team messed up my paper. What should I do?

Based on your comments, the typesetting problems are not just about ugly formatting, but they actually change the meaning of the article (and significantly increase the chance that people will misread ...
Szabolcs's user avatar
  • 2,160
30 votes

Should I continue reviewing a paper after having discovered plagiarised content in it?

As with any other serious issue, you don't need to waste your time with the paper that is obviously not publishable. Please note that 7 pages is a extreme case of plagiarism, and there is absolutely ...
xmp125a's user avatar
  • 3,925
29 votes

I got a paper to review from a journal that had rejected my earlier works, how to respond?

Is it weird that the journal is now thinking me capable of reviewing a manuscript? No, it isn't. Rejecting your papers was a judgement about those specific papers, not about your personal abilities ...
Henry's user avatar
  • 20.4k
28 votes

Review your own paper in Mathematics

I've had this happen before to a coauthor (they were neither the first nor last author in a list of ~6), who contacted the editor replying that obviously they couldn't review the paper. We had a ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 116k
25 votes

What should I do when my accepted paper is subsequently rejected?

This is pretty disturbing. You should immediately contact the editorial board of the journal and explain the situation. I would also doubt the quality of the mentioned journal by looking at the ...
Hospitantin's user avatar
23 votes

Identity of a supposed anonymous referee revealed through "Description" of the report

I would ignore the inadvertent disclosure of the referee's name. It is unimportant. Do not name the referee in your manuscript.
Anonymous Physicist's user avatar
22 votes

I got a paper to review from a journal that had rejected my earlier works, how to respond?

I suspect you ticked the "available for reviewing" box when you submitted your earlier work via Elsevier's editorial system. Your name then showed up in a list of potential reviewers based on the ...
Cape Code's user avatar
  • 27.1k
21 votes

Decision pending for more than 15 days

"Decision pending" means that the decision... is pending. They haven't decided yet. There isn't any secret code to deciphering the submission tracker. Things just always take much longer than we ...
nengel's user avatar
  • 8,361
20 votes
Accepted

What is standard record-keeping like for a journal editor?

These days editors don't do much paperwork because the editorial management system (EMS) does it for them. The EMS logs all actions, sends automated reminders to reviewers, informs the editor when a ...
Allure's user avatar
  • 128k
19 votes
Accepted

Is it okay to submit the revised manuscript well before the due date?

Yes, it is fine to submit revisions early. The timescale doesn't really come into it. Either the revised paper is good enough for publication, or it is not. The logistics of when you carry out the ...
user2390246's user avatar
  • 12.3k
19 votes

Review your own paper in Mathematics

Obviously, one should never, ever receive an invitation to review one's own paper, since that would make a mockery of peer review. Indeed, reviewing one's own paper is a good reason for retraction. ...
jakebeal's user avatar
  • 188k
18 votes

Why do potential reviewers take a lot of time to reject the request for review?

In addition to the Kerkyras answer, here is what happens all the time when I receive an invitation: The potential reviewer needs to find the time to skim the paper to form a well founded decision to ...
Dirk's user avatar
  • 38.1k
17 votes

Should a graduate student accept random offer to be a reviewer for IEEE Transactions paper?

Chances are the editor noticed you authored a paper on a similar topic and is inviting you based on that. There's no harm doing this. You might feel you're not qualified, but you're being invited, ...
Allure's user avatar
  • 128k

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