91

A question like this is almost always acceptable to ask. I cannot imagine that somebody will take offense at this, and I expect most academics appreciate high-school students looking for help and a reliable source, and I expect most will try to help if they have the time. However, time is big limitation for most academics, so do not be put-off if the author ...


61

I don't think I can improve on the answer of JeroendeK. It is fine to ask. But I think it is unlikely to be successful as the prof may not have a copy to be spared. But there is an alternative open to nearly everyone. If you are in a place with a university, go to the library there. If you are not, then ask your school (or town) librarian for help in ...


7

No. You probably don't need to reply. You should reply if: You have reason to believe that it will help your administrator to know that you've received the email. The email is unusually important/helpful to you. The email is unclear and you want clarification. The administrator is going "above and beyond". For example, because they are sending ...


7

These are called named professorships. If you put that term in a search engine you will get explanations from many schools. Typically, a large donation is made to fund the named professorship or named chair. The name can be the donor or someone the donor wants to honor. The person who gets the named professorship is selected by the school. It is often ...


7

In the US, many professors really don’t like the idea that students tremble in fear at any interaction with them, and/or regard them as a class of semi-divine beings who need to be constantly flattered and paid homage to. Any idea that the student’s actions are motivated by ideas like “hierarchy” “I should not bother to send another email unless it ...


5

There is no reason why you can't just reply-all to such an email, letting everyone know of your decision at the same time. Those who don't need the information can just ignore the mail. And include a thank-you with the acceptance. If you decline it, then the same would apply, with "thank you, but ..." for the award.


3

If you get a rather important one or something that can relate to your work, I would thank the professor that sent it to you. But you don't need to do that every time. Although he might have a forwarding list, it always makes people feel good when you thank them for their work. Many professors really appreciate a meaningful and descriptive thank you letter. ...


2

A question like this is always acceptable to ask. I don't think any body will take offense or be angry with this question. However if the author feels like he doesn't want to, send him a thank you email. Make sure to keep your email polite but about the topic and straight forward. Say that you are a high-school student and tell the author what you will use ...


2

I agree with Dan Romik's post above. The advice that your advisor shared does not, in my opinion, reflect US culture. As a professor, I am not offended or upset if a student does not reply to an email UNLESS I stated within the email that I needed a response. If a student does not send me a reply, I assume that my email addressed their concerns and that no ...


2

The higher on the hierarchy people are, the less they will care about this. The reason is simple: They don't even notice if you don't send an email. If you had ever seen a professor's inbox, you'd understand just how many very important emails they receive. You can safely assume that they won't even remember that High GPA didn't send the last email in an ...


2

Should I let the professor know that I am going to email their previous lab members? There is no reason to do that. I suggest it may be more useful to contact people who have left the lab, as they are less likely to feel a conflict of interest when describing their experiences. Ask about the supervisor's management style. Ask about how working in the lab ...


2

Given the new understanding of the issue, I'd suggest that you write to him, apologizing for the mail, and with an explicit request to let you know if he will do this. Perhaps your first mail wasn't clear on that point. But most professors receiving a request would normally assume that the default "yes, I can do that" is understood by the asker and ...


1

There are a few possibilities. For some, "independent researcher" is appropriate. But you can also say "currently unaffiliated" instead, rather than leaving it blank. That would be fine for a short term hiatus between jobs. Or something like "Unaffiliated, since July 2020" or whenever to emphasize that it is short term. (Short ...


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