If you need help with online teaching or other challenges in academia arising from the COVID-19 crisis, we have prepared this FAQ to get you started.
93

I don't see why Germany should be any different from other places, but generally it is a good idea to apologize for stupid things said drunkenly. And since this may have a bearing on the reputation of a third party you probably have an obligation to make sure the record is correct. Sooner is better than later in such things, so the professor doesn't spend ...


70

This shouldn't be a big deal. If I were in your position I would simply email the professor and apologise, say you had made a mistake. But keep it professional, don't make a big deal about it, and you don't need to draw attention to the fact you were drunk... especially since not everyone's drunkenness presents as making up random things about people, and it ...


12

There is no need to apologise for being drunk, as this is really not relevant; such a mixup could happen in any state of mind. There is also no need to apologise profusely for giving him false information; it is just a small mixup that is of little consequence to anyone. To keep the consequences at a minimum, it would grace you to spare your professor the ...


7

I don't appreciate being called; it imposes your time schedule on me. Others differ. However, I suspect that email is your safest bet. The practical problem is that many universities in Germany have been closed due to COVID-19, and the numbers listed will be the work numbers. Either you are calling an empty office, or your call is forwarded to the persons ...


6

Similar to business, one important key to be successful in Academia is having contacts and collaborations. Your relationship with your former advisor didn't finish on the day of your PhD examination. You should be one of his close colleagues in the domain and this applies to you as well. Otherwise, where to find collaborators for project proposals and joint ...


5

Is this customary? What would be the most polite way to ask? What is the best way to go about this? Don't overthink this: Just email your advisor, it is normal.


4

I don't know whether it would work in your situation, but I have often found that disagreeing in a questioning manner helps defuse more than disagreeing directly when dealing with this sort of 'build up' because explicitly disagreeing makes a person defensive and more rigid in their position. For example, instead of saying "Prof X wasn't being rude", you ...


4

It is fine to ask. Life goes on as best we can manage. The situation is worldwide, of course, and we don't yet see the end of it. In a letter, you could, if you wish, say you are sorry if the request is coming at a bad time and that you understand the global situation. You may not be able to get a reply in time, of course, or at all. But there is no ...


1

An acknowledgement would be proper: Researcher X was previously funded in this research by Z. It keeps it clean. While the company may no longer exist, its principals still do. In general, acknowledging liberally is preferred over being stingy.


1

I find it worrying to see so many questions like this. They make academia seem like a terrifying place. It really isn't. Standard rules of engagement apply (pun intended). So, someone (A) introduced me to someone else (B) via email, so that I can ask B questions and get advice. The email is directed at B, and I am copied. Should I wait for B to email me, ...


1

I have noted that Asian students tend to go with Dear Dr Firstname or Dear Prof Firstname. They mean nothing bad by it and I let it slide. If a student signs off with their full name, and I were to use their last name in my reply, it would come across as standoffish or an implied rebuttal. (This is UK culture.) So I respond with Dear Firstname; this is not ...


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