New answers tagged

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The most important things were said: if you want to leave your poster and browse other contributions, then find a good replacement of yours (colleague, who is aware of your research, co-author, even your professor would be a good option) if you don't have this persone, then be sure that you have your contacts written on your poster, print small A4 versions ...


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It is probably OK, but don't just walk off and abandon your poster if the other posters are in another room. In some conferences the posters are split throughout several rooms, so I think it's fine to look at the other posters in your room but not to go to the others. For example, they might want to take a photo of you with the poster and then just take ...


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I would have thought that attendance of men at such an event is likely encouraged, not just allowed. I recently wrote up a preprint attempting to outline the achievements of twenty female mathematicians and received positive feedback from many other female mathematicians working in academia who were happy that I had made this effort and attempted to ...


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Break the rules, and don't do it during the poster session! Before the poster session starts you quickly put up your poster (there is usually a time-slot for that with large margin) and then you look around to find if any of the other posters are interesting. Be prepared that the other poster presenters are busy and/or missing from their poster, but at ...


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I think it depends on the conditions of your source of funding. If it's a grant or money from your university or whatever, just have a glance at the terms or contract or whatever, to see if there are conditions on what you are allowed to spend it on. You should probably also have a look at such things as confidentiality, proprietary information, and such ...


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I see no problem with any of that provided that the funding is appropriate. There may be provision in grants for such aid, for example. Research and publication should be about ideas extending knowledge, not about the manual preparation of documents. And RAs often do some of that.


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In Germany, I would write "Dear Ms. X" as a less formal way, because Prof. X really sounds a bit too formal if they call you by your first name but in the USA they seem to be less formal. We had a Professor from there teaching programming for a while and he told us we can just call him by his first name so we did that (was computer science though, don't know ...


1

Split the time allocated to the poster session 50/50. If your poster designation is odd be at your poster for the first half of the session. If it’s even, then the second half. Use the other half to look at other posters. If the conference organizers are really on top of things, they may already have some system like this setup, in which case follow ...


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From my experience I think that it should be fine to reply address them with their first name. (Given the fact that the professor was raised or long term living in the US.) Where I live (Belgium), the general trend is to address someone using a formal greeting, most likely with a last name. Especially when addressing someone with a higher status. (Could be ...


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For the following I assume a conference with at most a few hundred participants that is well organised, i.e., early poster session(s), and posters can stay on display for the entire conference. In my experience, there are basically two kinds of “customers” you can attract with a poster, with little middle ground in between: People for whom skimming your ...


13

If she "signed" the Email, see how she signed it. People usually sign letters and emails (if at all), the way they'd like to be addressed by the recipient. If she signed with only (one of) her given name(s) (Y1), feel free to address her using that/those name(s) (the same she used), without any title, i.e. Dear Y1 The same applies in the unlikely case ...


32

Bring some post-its and a pen. Stay at your poster for half an hour. If you have people to talk to, continue talking to those people. If time frees itself up, write on a postit that you will be browsing other posters for half an hour, and you will be back for discussion at X o'clock. Other interested people can still look at your poster, and return at that ...


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Stick with Professor X until you get a blindingly obvious cue. It will not cause offence even if you missed a hidden cue that just Y1 would be appropriate. As a male, white former academic married to a (woman) professor, there is another unfortunate dynamic to be aware of. Unless Professor X has been extraordinarily lucky, she will have doubtless ...


17

Someone should probably stay by your poster throughout. If there is no one there it won't generate much of any interest. Posters are seldom so self explanatory that people will gain much without a bit of help. Perhaps a colleague or even your professor would be willing to help you out for a portion of the time required. But it should be someone who can ...


41

It depends on the venue. In a small room, you can easily wander around and get back to your poster quickly if you spot someone interested. In a huge conference hall, if you abandon your poster you may never know who visited it and when. So, if you have a large venue, ask yourself, what is your priority: to get your work out and have a chance of presenting ...


33

Continue to use the surname until explicitly given permission to do otherwise. One way for her to give that permission, actually, would be to sign a mail with only her first name. There is a power imbalance between you. She is probably not being entirely correct in assuming she can use your first name, but it is common for people in authority to take some ...


5

"The conference language is native language, but english contributions are welcome as well. The conference organizers have made it clear that both native language and English are acceptable and welcome for your conference materials. That means it’s entirely up to you. If you have strong feelings about supporting your local language, you can feel ...


3

Many conferences specifically state that The Language of the Conference is X for some suitable choice of X. If so, then use that language. Here, they state that the native language is preferred, so use that. But, if this conference is in Germany you can be pretty much assured that every academic, and many other people, will understand English. This is true ...


3

I cannot really answer whether a kind of treatment or another is preferable, but the treatment you describe might be at least partially influenced by a language misunderstanding. In Spain the word "profesor" means "teacher" or "lecturer". It is not a synonym for "professor" as an academic rank. In Spanish, a school teacher is a "profesor" as well. The word ...


4

From a german computer science student's perspective from 15 years ago: Our most respected professors were those two who announced that they wanted to be addressed on a first-name basis, using the informal pronoun "du" instead of the formal pronoun "Sie" (which is the standard of addressing a professor in germany). They announced that in the first lecture ...


1

We had at least one professor (maybe more I can't remember) that asked if it is okay if he uses our first names and we will use his first name in the first lesson. He was "my dads age" and quite infamous for having hard courses. I am not aware there was any problem with his authority. I think it boils down to your general demeanor and the name only plays a ...


2

I believe your question really stems from wondering if being referred to differently will affect the respect and authority you are recognized with. I was a teacher for 2 years, and because I felt more comfortable being called by my first name, I had the students call me Mr [First name]. That was with 5th, 6th, and 7th graders. They still understood ...


7

First, share your concerns with the editors. The reviewers may not have realized the extent of the work. If they agree that a long paper is fine, then write the long paper. If they don't want to do that then consider breaking the work into two papers with one referencing the other. You could even submit them simultaneously to the same journal. But it would ...


2

First, many journals these days allow for "supplementary information", which does not go in the main paper, but is available for download at the journal's website for interested readers. You could add a brief summary of the new content to the main paper (say a page) and then refer the reader to the supplementary information section if they want all the ...


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It depends on many things. What is the general culture at your university? You should at least be aware of how other faculty approach this situation. Being the one person who does things differently might be your style. But maybe you should consider that it gets you talked about, and not in a good way. At least until you have tenure. For undergrads, you ...


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Another element to consider is the point of view of students : in some cultures the students might be very uncomfortable calling you by your first name (and even if it isn't an issue in your country it could still be for international students). I would recommend "allowing" your students to call you by a formal title even if you allow them to use your first ...


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A certain amount of separation from your students has value. You have some power over their future, for example. The use of usted implies respect as well. This is useful if any conflicts arise in the future where you need to take a role of authority. But, having a friendly and open relationship with your students is also useful if it gives them the "...


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One question additional question I've got, you state you're not funded under the funded proposal. Does that mean you came to your advisors group with your own funding or are you being paid by the department to TA or something related? I ask this because the above two funding situations for a PhD student means the advisor is free to spend what would ...


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I have heard that the prefix 'Prof.' tends to be reserved for full, tenured Professors - is that true? For formal writing in the US, that is false. Assistant, Associate, and Full Professors are all titled "Prof." This would be especially true if a student is writing. Exceptions include: University websites, press releases, and promotion documents. In ...


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tl;dr. In a formal situation, be formal, otherwise... The US is pretty informal about titles (unless the professor is from a German university). So either should do in general (see below). Even an assistant professor can be referred to as "professor". It is even possible, if rare, that an Associate Professor won't actually hold a doctorate. But no one is ...


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