New answers tagged

0

TL;DR You're a teacher. This is a great opportunity to teach If you're it sure if someone has been rude to you or not, your best bet is to assume innocence. If you do otherwise, you risk punishing your student for something they didn't intend, and that would make you the bad guy. At ths same time, you rightly feel that this isn't something you should ignore. ...


2

An alternative interpretation Another consideration is that the use of caps is being used for another purpose. In gaming discussion groups, for example, capitalisation of individual words (like 'CODES') or a specific sentence can be used for emphasis or to draw attention to a specific word, especially when there is no formatting (like bold) or an absence of ...


2

To add to what everyone said, be aware that such students could be troublemakers in a wider sense. Such as rallying other students to disrespect you/expect immediate responses/etc, and reflect badly on you in the course evaluation. To protect yourself: be helpful do not engage in any heated exchanges respond timely and politely to all emails (next workday ...


9

In North American English, "doctor" without a name usually means a medical doctor. To address a PhD or university instructor in that manner is neither appropriate nor inappropriate, but it is unusual. "Professor Lastname" is a safe choice, but customs vary.


4

From the quotes you provided, it seems possible that the student may have been using all-caps for emphasis, as opposed to 'shouting.' She may also come from a culture where all-caps words are not considered shouting. If she is normally calm and respectful in class, I'd give her the benefit of the doubt; however, I would also advise her that many people ...


46

Very weak students are likely to have a comorbidity of poor language skills (possibly just starting to learn English as a second language), poor computer and keyboard literacy (e.g., not even having awareness or control over case-sensitivity), and poor email etiquette knowledge. These students are likely to face a cascade of system failures, not being able ...


3

Was she disrespectful in her emails? Is it acceptable to send an email in all caps? Am I wrong to deal with this point? Writing in all caps is not proper etiquette, and shouldn't be considered "acceptable". At the same time, your student seems to have little to no idea. So I would ignore the issue and consider that computers are challenging for ...


17

"you try to challenge me" When people are stressed, they sometimes revert to phrases used by their parents. "you try to challenge me" sounds exactly like what a parent would say to an unruly teenager. I suggest you reply with instruction rather than censure. You could say for example: "One of the purposes of higher education is for ...


96

For a one-off or short-term rudeness, my policy is to respond with pure facts, served chilled. If you have a good instinct for delivering comebacks at just the right level, a hint (but just a hint) of sarcasm might work wonders. Manners are important, but it's not our job to teach the students manners - and they are rarely grateful for it, especially those ...


11

In your syllabus, write down the times when you are available to answer questions. If you accept questions by email rather than during office hours (reasonable during lockdown), also explain how long it usually takes before the students can expect an answer. If students have multiple questions, advise them to schedule a videoconference or phone call so they ...


11

In a professional context, it is often acceptable and actually useful to address correspondents using their functional title. In this case I think it would certainly be acceptable to use  Dear Supervisors, It sidesteps the issue of order and immediately makes it clear in what capacity you address them. This would of course not be appropriate in the context,...


21

Does...the student...show disrespect? Maybe. Does using a full sentence with capital letter acceptable as a normal communication? All-caps emails aren't normal. Am I wrong to deal with this point? You needn't deal with this, just let it go. If the student repeats this behaviour, then you might want to take it further. (You needn't respond to student ...


83

No, "shouting" in an email isn't "normal". And, yes, it might imply disrespect. But I think that, given everything else you say, it is more likely that it indicates extreme PANIC on the part of the student (sorry for shouting there). But fear can cause people to act badly. Don't overreact without more evidence.


39

This may sound flippant but I’m being 100% serious: You’re doing a PhD in STEM and addressing your supervisors. The customary form of address is “Hi” or, if you have a very formal relationship with your supervisors, “Hello”; not “Dear Prof. Dr. X” — even in the traditionally hierarchical German system. Starting an email to your supervisor with “Dear Prof. Dr....


14

The etiquette and the courtesy, at least in my country, requires to greet the female first This answer will be a little bit on the philosophical side (probably too much so for some people’s taste), but I’d like to suggest another way of thinking about the question. Instead of asking what is tantamount to “how can I best conform to what my society expects of ...


16

In addition to @PhilYardman's point (which is correct) you also need to consider how directly your email addresses whom. This beats both hierarchy and gender: the importance in the style link in @PhilYardman's answer is evaluated in the context of the email. The ones who are primarily addressed (To) come first and are always greeted. So, if you primarily ...


95

Hierarchy beats Gender in Germany In a professional context in Germany, hierarchy beats gender, at least according to the Knigge, which is an etiquette guide of nontrivial influence. This goes as far as to be gender-blind. Only rank is important. So you would address the highest ranking person first, in this case, your professor.


4

This is a peculiar situation. Your supervisor did not honor your agreement, but at this point she has nothing to gain from continuing to be involved with your thesis, and being angry about that isn't going to help you in any way. Realistically, do not expect any more input from her, and move on. Getting someone else to look at your thesis could be useful, ...


4

I e-mailed her 4-5 times in February-March and got no reply. If she did not reply to your e-mails or otherwise advise you when she was technically your advisor, why would she reply to them now that you have graduated? I think she has effectively ended your relationship. I do not know whether she had good reason for this or if she is just lazy, but either ...


3

I would treat this like dating. You'll need to be honest and disclose red flags before you get engaged/married. But it doesn't need to come out on the first date. The reason is that so many other things might happen that would make disclosing the red flag totally unnecessary. For example, you write a professor expressing interest in working with him/her, ...


3

This is going to vary a lot by the country and customs of your university, and your relationship with your advisor. But I'd say, if you relationship with your advisor is good, then in the UK it would not be seen as out of order to refer to your supervisor as informally as you like in the acknowledgements sections of your thesis. In the theses I've read, ...


2

Generally, but this is only one person's opinion, it is better to be a bit formal in such a document. But standards can vary. Your best bet is to ask him how he would like to be acknowledged. You can specifically ask if an informal ack would be ok or not. But there are a few very prominent people who are known professionally by a nickname and it that case, a ...


3

In general, this is actually a question about separating your professional and personal life. It all depends on how this is handled by (I assume) you, the master's student. From the perspective of professionalism, who dates who (whom?) is not relevant to the professional conduct of either party and is, in short, nobody's business but yours. However, there ...


-1

Document everything and expose the thief. It will stop them and anybody else who can see what public exposure does to people who are deceitful and unjust. When you protect them or fail to nip it in the bud, they will only find a smarter, less conspicuous way to screw you over, again. It was what they intended to begin with. They are fighting without scruples,...


2

I replied,"Thanks for the update! I could start at the beginning of xxx." You're almost certainly okay. You haven't gotten the actual official offer, and though you've shown clear interest you haven't accepted anything. Of course, the PI involved could be disappointed, and if they're a jerk they could even retaliate by speaking badly about you. ...


10

About 10 years after getting my Masters in CS I came across an obscure feature on a software project I was doing on the side. It involved discrete math, which is mostly theoretical. Dr Itoga had taught this at the University of Hawaii, my alma mater. I decided to send him an email telling him that I finally had a chance to use what he had taught me, and ...


3

As you stay close to their field, it might be interesting to your professor. You could simply ask, if he wants further updates. Most PhD students leaving academia also leave their field and work on completely different topics or have other issues as those researchers face. In these case, it would be enough to talk to the advisor at alumni meetings or the ...


22

I expect there are some supervisors that would be annoyed by this, but I suspect they would be in the minority. A supervisor invests a lot into a student, and unless you left on bad terms, its most likely they'd love to hear how you are doing, I know I would.


68

I always appreciate such messages from old students. I often wonder what they are getting up to. I don't think I'm unique in that, but some would, perhaps, not be as happy with "interruptions." But you will get a sense of whether you should continue it if you do this from the response. Going back in person is also a nice thing to do if you get the ...


5

Do not send a duplicate email. Send a follow-up email, with the previous one at the bottom ("several weeks" is already long enough without even an acknowledgement of receipt). Send it from your other address without mentioning the spam issue. If your email was indeed lost to a filter, this resurrects it, without being an annoyance in the opposite ...


3

Just send an email in any way you want - send the very same email again, or state at the top that you would like to inquire about the status of your application below. As long as you do this once, all fine. If you keep doing it every other week, you will get people annoyed. As mentioned in the comments, application processes take their time. And if there ...


5

I doubt it makes a big difference. In general, the honorifics "Miss" and "Mrs." are considered obsolete in professional and academic settings, as marital status is not considered relevant (besides the sexist aspect that there has never been such a distinction in honorifics for men). They should not be used unless someone specifically ...


2

Assuming her title was not "Dr." (you said you checked, but just for future readers), Ms. vs Miss is not really offensive. I don't think anyone really knows what the difference is anymore. I bet you most Americans would say Ms. is short for Miss. Mrs. technically means married but is also therefore associated with being old. So a young woman might ...


14

Whatever you do, please do not send three independent emails. The reason is that if you do, then each of the three may spend time writing similar answers to your question, unaware that the others are doing the same. This wastes their time. Either pick one corresponding author to email directly (as rhialto suggests), or send a single message addressed to all ...


14

Pick one author - probably the corresponding author. If I received an email addressed to multiple authors of one of my papers - especially if it required any thinking - then it would go right to the bottom of my todo list, and probably stay there for months. If it were clearly aimed at me (eg to me, cc’d to the others, and I’m the corresponding author), it’d ...


35

My solution would be to send one mail. Personalization seems a wasted effort as you don't know the people, I assume. It even seems a bit presumptuous. But put all three authors on the TO: line, not some there and some on the CC:, line. The latter feels like you are picking a lead author and they may not agree with that. With twenty authors, the corresponding ...


1

I've read the other answers and I don't think anyone else has mentioned the following. This is a classic case of the old proverb, "too many cooks spoil the broth". Either that or you could present it that way. You could explain that you simply find it confusing to get advice from so many sources and would prefer to limit this. Of course the risk is ...


8

I'll be the one dissenting voice and suggest you look for the silver lining. Maybe the reason the other two advisors aren't pushing her out is because they also see the value of some grist in the mill. Life is about gleaning hidden lessons. Maybe she really does have something to contribute even if in a way you don't fully appreciate right now. If her ...


3

It's tempting to become emotionally involved here, but you need to resist that temptation. If the student (or their advisor) wanted to involve you more, they would have done so already. If would be courteous to write back, and if they remember to thank you in a final version, that would be nice, but discourtesy is not a big deal. If you did, indeed, find a ...


1

Do nothing. You've fulfilled your duty. The author needs to act, not you. The author should be considering your advice. They may find you're wrong, or they may change their paper in response to your advice. Either way, they should have thanked you. You shouldn't expect any changes to be released immediately. The author may be making many changes and they may ...


37

Set a meeting with all three advisors, explain you'd like to focus entirely on the writing, and ask whether regular meetings can be replaced with less-regular meetings when you need support.


15

This sounds like a rather delicate matter. On the one hand, your request to not have your supervisory team shaken up while you are finishing your thesis is completely reasonable. On the other hand, if she was your supervisor before leaving it can be painful to come back from a long medical leave and see that your projects moved on to the extent that you aren'...


21

If she isn't a formal advisor you might just get by ignoring her. But if that doesn't seem right, I'd suggest working through one or both of your other advisors. They can quietly speak to her about the fact that her communications are disruptive and not helpful. It might be harmful for you to say the things they they can say comfortably. Let this be a ...


3

I'm interpreting your question as whether it's acceptable to ask for a decision based on the single reviewer report received so far. You could certainly ask but the editor's reaction is probably unpredictable. Some will be OK sharing the report (this gets more likely if the report isn't controversial), others will not be hurried. The problem with sharing the ...


-4

You should not request special treatment because your paper is about a major current event. Journals will have many papers about the event, and they already know those papers are urgent.


Top 50 recent answers are included