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This is an extended "specify the country" comment, but as it expands the perspective of the two answers I see, here we go. The question is country-, discipline-, and also community-specific. Across Europe, there are maths faculties in which "Professor X", or even "sir" will ring too formal, and there are those where omitting the ...


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In my environment (Italy, engineering university), I would expect students to refer formally to me as "prof. X". In many cases (PhD students, master thesis students that I supervise, etc.) I will ask them to call me by first name. So, my suggestion is: start formally, unless the professor tells you otherwise.


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This has a cultural element so it varies. Some places tend to be quite formal and others not so. My perspective is the US. But as an undergrad you probably shouldn't make assumptions and use a title until told otherwise. Of course, you can also ask. I normally expected my undergrad and even master's students to be fairly formal as I think a certain ...


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For this short answer, I'm using information from an earlier question that you asked here; namely, that you are a 2nd year undergraduate student. I'm not familiar with how Asian universities operate, but the below would by and large apply to both Europe and the U.S. If there is any researcher at your university you are interested in working with (probably as ...


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First, be careful. Seeing a paper and writing "Dear Prof. X, I saw your recent paper "Title" and I found this extremely exciting, this is exactly what I want to do." can backfire: Maybe this is not what the professor is interested in, but it is just a side project, mainly driven by some other people, to which he made contributions. This ...


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Rather than explaining in the email why you would want to join this particular lab over any other lab, I would simply write an email that says something like Dear Professor X, I'm in my second year at uni and I am considering which group to join. I read your recent paper ABC and would love to learn more about the work you and your group does. Do you maybe ...


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I see no reason that you should be worried about sending your support note to the professor. This happens all the time. People more often send disagreeable, if not nasty notes to people they do not agree with. This may be your introduction to the professor by way of explaining your work, etc.


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Yes. Telling someone you appreciate their taking a public stand you agree with, thanking them for it, is always appropriate and appreciated, especially when you suspect they've taken some heat for doing so.


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Essentially, my question is how good are my chances of getting into a highly competitive program if it seems the advisor is very much on my side? If this is your main question, then I think there is no clear answer that will satisfy you. I think the question with a more useful answer might be Should I bank on getting into the PhD program because the advisor ...


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I think that asking won’t hurt. But that said, just because two PIs are jointly advising a student on a degree does not entitle one to be privy to all exchanges with the other. Or put another way: just because you have two advisors doesn’t mean you lose all rights of privacy when communicating with either one of them. Of course sometimes information concerns ...


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Actually, you should ask them directly. Different people will have different preferences. Alternatively you could start out copying both and then stop if either of them suggests it. But, it is probably best to keep them equally informed about your progress and current activities. Questions that are more in the purview of one of them than the other might be ...


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I would recommend against this. Not that it is wrong, but that it is unlikely to get you anything you can't get yourself from a literature search. Most such conferences are recurring, perhaps annual. Find the proceedings of the conference for the previous few years and see what you find. The abstracts of articles may be enough to see what the landscape looks ...


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