New answers tagged

2

He’s written that he’s offering you an academic internship to work on a numerical calculation similar to the example he sent you, WHILE you continue your studies. You must be a Ph.D candidate, and as such, you more than likely can have up to three “internships” or rotations with different faculty members within the department to help you choose what your ...


4

Ask directly You need a clear answer, and it's rather important for everyone involved that there is no misunderstanding. So you do have to explicitly ask about the funding. What did you ask for initially? From the message you quoted, it seems that you asked for X and the professor responds that yes, they're giving you that.... but if you did not ask for ...


16

How do I go on about asking him politely about it? Usually, the academics have their own funding, and it is not usually rude to ask them for some money. Thus, you can simply go with this: Dear Professor, I am honored by your kind comments. I am willing to study under your supervision. I would like to ask one thing. Is it possible for you to ...


26

What does he mean by "host"? Host means (at a minimum) that you can work in the lab - the professor will provide space for you during the internship. Does it mean funding? It is ambiguous. This partially depends on what you asked for in your original letter asking for an internship. How do I go on about asking him politely about it? Being hired is ...


4

I'm going to take a contrary position here and say the professor is being unreasonable. He gets to set the rules during his class but, as I've pointed out in several comments, a professor can't just commandeer a room. If peace and quiet are important to him then he could always just deny students access to the room until just before class starts and make ...


8

Even after class he threatens to write me up for having my phone out whether it’s just to check the time or look something up. (I’m usually the last to leave as I don’t feel the need to rush out of the room and generally try to clean up pretty well before I go) Have you considered that this behavior of yours could be considered quite rude and might in fact ...


0

The limitation isn't one of "time," but rather of "space." Basically, as long as the professor is in the classroom, it is his "room," even though class is not in session. So he can set the rules for the classroom during his time there. He can't forbid you from using your phone, before, after, or during the class as long as you are outside the classroom. (...


10

First of all, his room, his rules, so he gets to decide what he wants to allow. That said, try asking him politely what his concerns are about phone use before or after class. Maybe you can suggest an alternative policy that he's happy with, but keep in mind that his extreme policy is probably the result of past experiences with immature students abusing ...


-1

He's joking. There is no such thing as a demerit in college. If he wanted to penalize you, he would say, I'm taking 3 points off your grade every time I see you with that phone out. Read the syllabus for his class policy on phones.


6

The Professor needs a (relatively) quiet classroom before and after class: Before class - to prepare, concentrate and/or relax before teaching - which is a stressful and demanding activity. After class - to gather up his things and collect his/her thoughts and observations of the dynamics during class, and/or to attend to students who come up to him/her ...


9

Graduate programs don’t operate based on charity or friendship - admittance is based on merit. If you turn down the offer from B, the only rational thing for the administrators of that program to do after you turn them down is move on to the next person on their ranked list of candidates, if they still have room to admit more students, or simply write off ...


3

You can tell your friend that you won't be accepting the offer and maybe they can act on it. You can, in rejecting the offer from B, suggest that they accept your friend. If that is what you mean, it probably has little to no effect. Certainly it would have less effect that a letter from a known professor. To be honest, I've never heard of such a thing. ...


95

I think your description of what’s going on is misleading. The professor is not “telling you you can’t use your phone before class”. He’s telling you you can’t use your phone before class in the classroom when he’s also in the classroom. Is that reasonable? I honestly don’t have a strong opinion. I can certainly see why it’s annoying to you on the one hand, ...


17

You are overstepping your boundaries: you don't bear the responsibility of teaching the class, and hence you do not set the standards of behaviour inside the classroom. Simply exit the classroom if you want to use your phone.


2

My question is: is it out-of-line for me to contact one of my colleagues on the hiring committee, explain the situation, and ask about the status of my partner’s application? This is definitely out-of-line --- any contact with the hiring committee to attempt to influence them in favour of hiring your partner is contrary to the assurances that universities ...


2

In most cases when you get an editorial/referee comment that is a misunderstanding of the paper, it behooves you to add something in the paper to address this possible misunderstanding. The fact that you have already added a footnote dealing with the matter, and this is insufficient, means you will have to consider expanding this to a larger explanation in ...


2

Firstly, on behalf of university academics, I'm very sorry you are being subjected to that kind of talk about your performance. What you are describing is not constructive criticism, and it is not a good way to give feedback to a student (even if their work is actually terrible). It sounds like your advisor is acting out of frustration, and has lost the ...


1

I'll need to deal with the inevitable peer negativity and rumor mill that'll spring up. You must work in a really bitchy department if you get peer negativity and rumors just for wanting to pursue an alternative career path. In a well-functioning department, we wish departing staff all the best, and thank them for their service. In any case, whether or ...


25

Short answer: Yes, he can (unless there is a rule to the contrary) If I understand your description correctly, you are present in the lecture room outside of the designated lecture time, and the professor is enforcing his no-phone rule while you are in that room, but outside of the time for the lecture. Assuming that this is an accurate understanding of ...


4

In terms of etiquette, yes. A simple "Thank you sir/mam" helps acknowledge their response. The alternative is to say the thank you to them when you meet them the next day. Reason: Unacknowledged conversations tend to leave a doubt in anybody's mind about whether the response was useful to the recipient or not. Certain people tend not to reply to an email ...


1

I've lived in Japan for two years and can speak the language to some extent. Keigo is complicated, and any rule you learn about seems to have lots of exceptions. After two years, I felt that I had some idea, but I felt that I had far from mastered the intricacies. In particular, older people often addressed me using keigo for reasons I didn't quite ...


1

This is not right! I don't see any underlying support in the advisor's attitude. Don't be afraid to take whatever action necessary to get yourself into a situation where your personal skills are given the opportunity to develop. It's your life and it's short. You can excel when you find the right way for yourself. Have some courage to not fit into anyone ...


3

I occupy one of these positions, so I can explain it. In the Spanish system there is no concept of tenure as such. There are two kinds of permanent profesorial positions, catedratico and profesor titular. Employment as either means that one is employed as a funcionario de carrera, which means a civil servant with all the accompanying civil service ...


7

I can't judge whether the advisor is making a correct evaluation and being a jerk about it, or just being a jerk. But, at a minimum, you need a different advisor. It should be someone who has some faith in you and encourages your best work. Staying where you are, under this advisor, is unlikely to result in success. But you have to evaluate your own ...


3

I think you just lay out the facts as you see them, pointing to supporting evidence as necessary. If the editor can't be convinced then how you say things isn't going to matter much. Let the facts speak for themselves. Point up the flaws in X as applied to your work. And if you need to reference textbooks, do so, even citing page numbers. You may lose the ...


1

While the comment of Solar Mike is correct (patience), and you don't want to be a pest, there is one thing you can do that would be useful in any case. Send a mail asking for any help on getting an early start. Are there papers you should read, for example? That keeps you in the mind of the professor, advances your cause, but also gives you something to do ...


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