New answers tagged

2

So my question is: how much of the responsibility lies on the MathSciNet reviewer who "validated" the proof? My understanding is that it is their duty to reveal the mistakes in the published article, so that the other authors do not base their work on it. Is there a way to "nudge" the reviewer to make amends to the review? None. Unlike what your title ...


13

(Disclosure: I review for MathSciNet.) how much of the responsibility lies on the MathSciNet reviewer who "validated" the proof? In my view, very little if any, and by using the word "validate" I think you overstate the case. Reviewing for MathSciNet is not meant to be like refereeing, and reviewers are definitely not asked to check the correctness of ...


6

how much of the responsibility lies on the MathSciNet reviewer who "validated" the proof? None. The instructions for reviewers don't ask the reviewer to check the validity of the proofs; by a time a paper gets to MathSciNet it has been peer reviewed already. The purpose of a MathSciNet review is to explain what's in the paper and why someone might want to ...


6

As a graduate student, I don't have the authority to suggest how the department should conduct itself That’s incorrect. You absolutely have the authority to suggest improvements to the program curriculum, and in all but the most incompetently run of departments, your suggestions would be welcomed, and given at least fleeting consideration; in a really well-...


2

I suspect that you will have little impact in "asking". And you may not be considering the actual requirements of implementing a change, since you are asking experienced professors to do something new and even if they are willing, they will find it awkward to change, causing disruption. The chair will probably recognize this disruption and will not be wildly ...


8

It is typical for catering contracts to include some sort of 'service fee' that serves like a 'tip', and you can assume that the staff are paid a better base wage than tip-supported employees typically are. Even regular restaurants often have a non-optional 'tip' added on for larger parties (thresholds vary but "8 or more" seems common). That said, ...


-4

In the end, you are asking whether you should pay out of your own pocket for work. No. You should not have to pay out of your own pocket anything in order to perform your work duties; and despite what some would say, this kind social events are very much part of work (see elsewhere on this site). Either the organizers should step up, or you should get ...


9

Rather than just asking if they received the previous email, reiterate what it is you're asking about, why you're asking them specifically, and include a deadline. This saves the recipient from having to trawl back through three weeks' worth of email to find your original request. So, you might want to send something like "Dear Professor X, Is it possible ...


2

First of all, congratulations on completing your second bachelors degree online, while working, 11 years after finishing a Masters. In my opinion, this is a bigger accomplishment than might meet the eye, and certainly a bigger accomplishment than you get credit for on paper. There is nothing wrong with asking for a letter of reference 11 years or 50 years ...


0

It's normal and shows camaraderie. Some places will ask the audience to leave after the presentation part is over, when the questioning occurs. (Mine did.)


0

In many cases not only it is not inappropriate but it is welcome and set in regulations. In Denmark, as an example, Doctorate defences are public in the sence that they can (and are) be attended by any member of the public, university related or not. In principle I completely agree with dissertations being accessible to anyone. However, to be on the safe ...


4

A short thank you email would be appropriate. "Thank you for the continued interest. I look forward to the interview and the future". Something along those lines, but you can probably come up with a better statement. It lets them know that you got the message, and, more important, that you are still very interested.


3

Traditionally (i.e. several hundred years of tradition) these things are public. Intentionally so. I urge you to go, or at least ask your friend whether they would object - which they should not. In fact other students in the department should probably also attend, just to get a sense of the sorts of things that get asked. My own final act as a student ...


1

They are your friends. What do you think about them? Will they be happy about your support? Or not to be examined in front of friends? In my opinion, you should ask them before (not too strange since at a Zoom meeting, there is no buffet for them to organize). Maybe they didn't ask you because they worry you find it boring? Don't ask questions at the defense ...


9

If they did not ask for the data I would not be worried about sending the data. If the PI were interested, they would ask you for the data. We cannot possibly know what the PI's impression of you. But if you were to ask for a recommendation letter, you should summarize your achievements in their lab and ask them if they could provide a "strong" ...


2

First of all, not all YouTube educational videos are in the TED talk format. There are many lecture format videos How to tell them that watching videos is no substitute for learning. How do I tell this to the students without appearing like abandoning my duties? How do I convince them that I will really help them study this subject beyond what ...


34

So first, it seems a little strange that after an entire year of work, they would suddenly be "too busy to take on undergrad students." Of course I am only speculating, but my guess is that they (rightly or wrongly) didn't think your project was going anywhere and decided to cut you loose. This would also explain why they didn't ask for your data or notes, ...


1

The lab is obligated to keep records of its data, if that is reasonably feasible. If you did not leave the data with the lab, you should make it available to the lab. In my opinion, it is the supervisor's responsibility to ensure this is done. This isn't likely to have a significant effect on letters of recommendation.


4

I've just embraced YouTube as part of my teaching. I've not used it to replace lectures or any classes but created my own separate YouTube content that serves a different purpose. I am a copious consumer of YouTube, so I am perhaps familiar with some of the content there. I find that the viewers want to watch someone solve a problem or do something ...


3

I would suggest not for each of them. He probably just has a forwarding list and does this as a matter of course. Since you describe it as happening in a research group, he is probably trying to make sure everyone sees things that might advance the work of the group generally. However, if you find any of them particularly useful for your own work, thank ...


5

It doesn’t matter all that much. But in general it’s good practice to thank people when they help you with something. And the extra workload imposed by dealing with such thank you emails is too insignificant to worry about. When in doubt about these sorts of questions, apply the rule “professors are people”.


2

The answer to this question varies enormously depending on the person... I myself definitely do like acknowledgements and/or "thank-you"s... in part as confirmation that people received the email, and that my response was helpful (I do also often ask, as closing, "Is this addressing your question?") Other people seem to have no interest in confirmation of ...


6

It's ruder to waste their time. Just send a simple email saying "Thank you for agreeing to write a letter for me, however I realised I accidentally asked too many people to write letters for me for this position, so you don't need to continue writing one for me. I would still like to ask you to write a letter for me in the future, if I decide to apply to ...


15

First, I am an undergraduate student in math who started working under a professor last Fall. Congratulations! During January I sent him an email with a question though I did not expect a response until he got back. Given that he has presumably been back for 2 weeks, is it appropriate for me to send him another email with a follow-up or should I wait for ...


2

There is no harm in sending an e-mail again under the pretext that the e-mail you sent in January may not have gone because of poor internet connection.


0

I can't see any need to notify the second program. It would be courteous, and may be necessary, to tell the current program, depending on circumstances. They may need to fill the slot you are leaving as is the case in many medical programs.


2

There is no standard, but most frequently, the 'birthday child' themselves initiate the Festschrift. This may be disillusioning, but it is the reality. I can say that as someone who has been involved with a few Festschriften (including once as an editor). Only in exceptional cases can I imagine a Festschrift being initiated without the jubilarian's ...


0

It would be very useful for the community if you clarify that you have implemented your version of the algorithm and provide the details of parameters (if any) in the supplementary material or your experimental setting. You don't probably need to elaborate on why you implemented other algorithms, the readers can guess what has happened! It would be also very ...


0

No it is not appropriate and such statement or “accusation” should not be part of a scientific publication. None of the readers would be interested in that detail and it also does not serve the purpose of your paper. Instead of pointing of that the authors refused to hand out their source code, you can simply mention that the source code is not available ...


0

Acknowledge the source of the algorithm, gratefully, state that the code is not based on the earlier code and do not complain that the earlier code was unavailable. As others have pointed out, they may lack the legal authority to give you the original code, and in any case the new code serves as independent confirmation of the algorithm.


1

Is it appropriate to mention that authors refused to provide code samples when asked? I work in a sub field of computer science. There was a recent paper (2020) that was published in a reputable conference that claimed to achieve state of the art performance on a specific data set. There are several issues. FWIW, I am a semi-academic research ...


0

The whole providing source code of the paper thing has been discussed to death on this site and elsewhere, so I won't get into it much. I agree with you that they should have given source, and it should be required by journals anyhow. That said, currently it is not. It would be nice if they helped you reproduce their work, but they don't have to. If you ...


-2

TL;DR: Your professor probably does not care about these issues as much as you do. That is a non-problem. Just reach out to your professor and do not sweat over it. Focus on whatever is more important than these grades. Family, sports, opposite/same sex, this does not worth your time. Longer answer: If you have a concern about something that affects your ...


4

It is perfectly acceptable to give your professor negative feedback on the exam format. You can either do this by email, or you could do it anonymously with an unsigned letter in her pigeonhole on campus (once it is open). Since the exam format was necessitated by the remote learning circumstances due to COVID-19, it is likely that your professor already ...


0

Some ramblings -just to provide another perspective- before the answer. I can share my experience as a "user" for similar occasions. CS is not my field, and I can not rewrite each and every algorithm that claims to be a "drastic improvement" (Spoiler alert: Most are not). I simply do not have time, and brute force algorithms usually work for me. Usually. ...


17

It’s totally appropriate to point out to your professor that your grade is suffering for technical reasons having to do with the online format of the exam. If your professor is reasonable she will not be in the least bit offended by this. By the way, we are pretty much all dealing with issues of this sort nowadays. I experienced something similar just a few ...


6

Without knowing why the authors declined, it's a bit hard to tell if the other authors were "nice" or "naughty". There are some legal and institutional pitfalls when it comes to sharing code. As an example, the university may have the right to check if the concrete research output contains patentable material. The authors may be forbidden from sharing their ...


0

I appreciate the bad taste in your mouth, but please put yourself in the shoes of a reader who is interested in research as a distilled outcome of a methodology in the net of predicaments and accidents. On a note that the implementation of their algorithm is your implementation I'd expect yes. You ought to specify to which extent your work is original and ...


-2

Have you been able to reproduce the results or not, from the description of the algorithm in they article? This is not clearly seen in your question. If yes, then the article is complete and there is nothing to complain about. If not, the, yes, there is something to say about just the wording should be different: "We have repeated these experiments but ...


80

As a software engineer, I'll give the dissenting opinion. Source code is not an algorithm. It's a "dusty mirror" version of something which hopefully is the algorithm they intended and which hopefully performs correctly. Software being software, and coders being human, there are many ways in which those "hopefully" parts may not be as expected. It is ...


4

With the information given, it is not possible to assess the motivation of the original authors. As a frequent publisher of open source scientific code, I can think of several. They did not want anyone to replicate their results using their code, as they wanted to make more publications from it (certainly not nice, but seen before). Their code was not in a ...


4

I don't see why they wouldn't share their code especially if they claim a state of the art on a very important data set. Hypothetically, one can make software that can't legally be distributed under copyright law. If I own a book I can write notes on it and cross out sections all I want - but I can't distribute copies of my modified book. Likewise, if I ...


6

My advise is to get the most out of the situation as it is: you did a proper replication from the description in the paper (as opposed to "just" running their code) and verified their claims. Publish this as such: this is proper scientific work. In your own interest, I'd not mention that you did not do this replication entirely of your own free will. ...


122

would be advisable to add a note that the implementation of THEIR algorithm is our implementation Absolutely yes. This provides important context for your experimentation and as such, is valuable information for the reader. Even better, you could make your implementation of their algorithm publicly available, so that future groups of authors will not ...


2

Unless the topic of your research is open source software, your journal article is not the right place to criticise your colleagues for not releasing their source code. Journal articles and conference papers should be about the knowledge you have created, not your opinion of your colleagues. Before criticising your colleagues in any venue, you should ...


10

You can, and maybe you should in order to make your position clear that you think that academic codes should be shared if that is feasible. Many scientists will agree that sharing codes leads to better science because it makes it easier to replicate research, and also to find mistakes. At the same time, not everyone feels like that, and you happen to have ...


2

It's being noted in the comments that programs like this often have VM-detection. If that's the case, this likely won't work. If she still intends to use it, what can I do? If in the end you are required to use the software, and there's no other reasonable path than to use it, consider setting up a Virtual Machine that you install the software on instead....


1

Your supervisors are not yet experienced enough to understand that it is unprofessional to talk in insulting way, subtle insulting including. The criticism should address very exact technical or scientific aspects, argument the reasons why should be done a different way, be communicated in emotion-free way and in general concentrate on making science, not on ...


6

If you read my answer to this question you will see that I don’t have a fanatically pro-privacy view about such things. I do understand where your professor is coming from. On the other hand, I don’t think your objections are unreasonable. In fact they seem reasonable enough that I think emailing the professor to ask about this is quite appropriate, although ...


4

If you can suggest a solution to your professor rather than just a problem you might get a better outcome. Do some evidence gathering and then email your professor ccing any other relevant people involved in the administration of this exam stating that you have serious concerns about the integrity of Examity and give your reasons. Then suggest an alternative....


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