New answers tagged

3

Given the track record of the journal so far, I'd say you're better off sending the original journal a message saying that you're withdrawing your submission, and starting over at another journal. You don't need to wait for an acknowledgement of your withdrawal (which might never come) from the first journal (answers to this question say you should wait for ...


1

There is no one correct answer since it will depend a lot on the personalities of the professors and whether they already work together. A hybrid strategy that can be efficient in some cases, is to first contact the person who is closest to your theme, and finish by asking whether they advise you to contact the other names on your list. That shows that you ...


9

It should be fine (and likely correct) to use her first name. AFAIK signing with one's first name is typically a signal that you can (even preferably) address them by their first name, and the fact she specifically asked to address you by your first name in my opinion strengthens this. If you stick with Prof., she may feel uncomfortable addressing you by ...


6

TL;DR: You already received an invitation to call her by her first name. In (modern) western cultures, if you are an adult and someone more senior (in standing) addresses you by your first name, you follow their guidance and address them by their first name. Not doing so is usually rude. Exceptions apply, e.g., if you are communicating with the Queen.


4

It seems to me that you really wouldn't want to end up with a PhD supervisor who would react negatively to you iniating a discussion about this. So don't worry about putting off a potential supervisor, but rather view this as a filtering out process from your side. The best time for stuff like this is towards the end of the process, shortly before you accept ...


0

See if the journal has a general email. The individual staff member might no longer be employed by the company. For example the journal Physics of the Dark Universe has a general email dark@elsevier.com (in the "contact the editorial office" tab of that page) which should always reach whoever is in charge of the journal right now. If the journal ...


0

Yes, I think it would be quite reasonable to email a member of the editorial board at this point. I don't think of this as anywhere close to a "nuclear" option -- in my own experience, few of the academics involved in the publication process are intimately familiar with automated submission systems or can vouch for how they are supposed to work. ...


5

Your sister should not complain to the Gunners about their behavior. While they are not being helpful, they seem at least well-intentioned, and in any case have no obligation or responsibility to help your sister (or even to avoid unwittingly sabotaging her efforts by using the Q&A platform in a way they perceive to be consistent with its intended use). ...


5

On piazza and edstem you can mark questions as private. I assume you must be using canvas or another platform without private questions as that is a trivial solution. Honestly the "gunners" are just scapegoats in this situation. The instructor(s) should be monitoring the course discussion page and reading all the questions and any answers there. If ...


5

I wouldn't mention it; it doesn't mean anything. You could have 30 papers under review in Science or Nature tomorrow (or substitute any favorite journal or conference in your field) if you wanted to spend a bunch of time with their manuscript submission software, and depending on venue a bunch of money on submission fees. What does that say about the quality ...


13

It does not matter. There is no etiquette requirement that you should do so, but neither would it be unduly rude to send a note. If the editor sees an e-mail from you, coming on the heels of a desk rejection, they will probably be pleasantly surprised when they start reading the e-mail and find that it is a short, polite note of thanks for their work—rather ...


6

This isn't necessary. Once a paper is desk rejected it's out of the journal's hands and likely their minds as well, since they have nothing more to do and are not expecting to have anything more to do. Such a reply does say you have received the decision, but you kind of must have received the decision, since after all you submitted the paper using that ...


3

Yes, you can email the corresponding author. They may or may not receive or read your email, but there isn't much you can do about it. No, you do not need to stack credentials. Even mentioning them at all, especially in the beginning of your email, probably makes it more likely it will be thrown away than read. You will sound like a crazy person if you ...


Top 50 recent answers are included