New answers tagged

9

The one thing other good answers here have not touched on is this : What can I expect from the course content This is an awfully open-ended question. The professor can probably summarize the course in ten different ways for ten different audiences - which type of answer are you looking for, exactly? This forces them to guess what you're interested in ...


3

I said part of this in a comment upthread, but in the light of the reworded question, it becomes an answer. There is a way one could construe the process such that the professor's response is not negative at all. Step 1: the professor misunderstands "hope this email finds you well" as "hope this email reaches you". Step 2: the professor ...


2

A Professor is not a demi-god (or full one). He is human, fallible, and as with humans you get all kinds of cases on the "Am I an Asshole Or Not?" In your case, he hit the mark "Yes, you are - a flamboyant one". With flying colors. To answer your question: your email was perfect, much better than the "hello, pls snd info on crse for ...


11

You didn't break any rule but you may find the professor not well. I suppose the professor's work consists of: Teaching undergrads (preparing the course, preparing and avaluating test) Supervising PhDs Being active researcher (filling up grant proposals, filling up reports, filling up bugets, organizing lab work, writing articles, reviewing articles) Being ...


0

In some countries, offers come from universities, as opposed to individual researchers, and the university guarantees the funding. You should ask other students, or the graduate chair if there is one. In any case, it's a good idea to clarify this with your supervisor.


2

I would not reply to the answer of the professor, which I find dismissive; I agree with the other answers until this moment. It seems to me that the professor shows zero interest in making that subject interesting for students. Maybe they don't care about the number of the students enrolled on it. Maybe the course content isn't worth signing up for. A better ...


3

Definitely talk to your professor. As Bryan Krause says, not in an accusatory tone. Just inquire. You can say that you read that the project expires ini 2022 and you'd like to inquire what the plans are for that project or any follow-up projects. Maybe the project will get an extension (which might still not be enough to finish a PhD). Or maybe a follow-up ...


8

I think the email is fine, however if I need to critisise the mail, there are two formulations which would trigger me Hope this email finds you well This is not only a cliche phrase used in many Nigerian scam mails which people tend to get nearly weekly (at least in the past). It can also be seen as a greeting between peers. I mean, it’s probably different ...


6

so you must know how to address them appropriately Maybe they were upset that you didn't address them as "Doctor". Doesn't justify the impolite response, but some people are sticklers about that.


18

Suggestions have been made that the Professor's problem might be grammatical (some nit with your opening?) or formal (he prefers to be referred some other way, a different title or something?) But what if he is giving technical advice? That is, perhaps he is referring to emails in particular, since he mentions them. Note that emails in email software are ...


8

It's common for funding to end during a prospective PhD student's expected stay, especially in places where a PhD takes 5 or more years. If grants are for about 3-5 years then this is almost a certainty. It's not unusual to get a student late in a funding cycle - maybe there wasn't an appropriate student for the role until now, maybe a prior candidate went ...


165

There is nothing inappropriate (that anyone can see here) in the way that you've written your email. The response from the professor suggests that they're some combination of (a) incredibly time-constrained, (b) sloppy and unclear in how they communicate, and (c) a jerk. It's possible (as user2768 suggests) that the essential "offense" in their ...


16

First, no reply is needed and will probably result in another push back. But the only problem I see, other than possible insensitivity by the professor, is that, while one letter might be fine, if it is short, it takes time to read (with your personal details) and more time to answer. Imagine being on the other end and getting 30 of these (300?). What if ...


7

The email is very well written. Do verify that the name is not misspelt; some take great offence to this. Additionally, please check if the website offers any details on communication, I.e. TAs to contact etc. If there are any guidelines there, do follow them. A lot of professors (especially at the type of institute I infer you are at) simply don't respond ...


73

Your email is impeccably written. If I compare it to the emails I receive from my students, it would fall in the 99th percentile in terms of email etiquette, grammar, formatting, and including the information relevant to the question you are asking. Your email also compares very favorably with the professor’s reply, which violates several standard rules of ...


98

Your language isn't the problem, your email is well-written, but you've seemingly wasted the professor's time. You could have looked up the information, as they have explained: You may see course content on the department webpage. Comments suggest I'm ignoring the professor's words: you must know how to address them appropriately The word address can mean ...


21

Since no-one here is the teacher in question, it is difficult to know exactly what they meant. The only way to be sure is to ask them, but given your initial contact with this person, that is probably a bad idea. If the person really meant that you were wrong when addressing the mail (and were correct), I can see only one possibility: The person is not a ...


16

Another thing that is slightly unusual (and possibly may considered inappropriate by someone) is the signature. In my experience, usually you don't sign your e-mails "Name - Department - Institution" unless you work there. Being a student does not earn you that right. That said, I agree with the others that the mail is not particularly ...


8

General rule: be concise. Show you did some efforts, next time mention in the email "I have seen that the course page has not been updated in years and I was wondering if it still actual" but only if you feel the course is outdated; You will be following his/her course, why should he/she care about the previous courses you attended? I have a ...


53

First, I'd double-check your work. Are you certain this is a mistake? Is there something you're missing? Do the best you can to understand what's going on. Second, I would definitely raise this with your supervisor, but do so from a perspective of questioning and seeking clarification. Rather than appearing in judicial robes with the paper in hand and ...


16

Regardless of your "moral obligations", any reasonable advisor would be happy to hear this from their PhD student, especially if you make it sound like a (potentially tricky) question, not an accusation of making a simple mistake.


2

This sort of "guest" authorship is not unheard of. For instance, that may be why Chinese universities primarily give credit to the first or corresponding authors of papers (as opposed to other authors, who may be "guest" authors). Assuming your description of the situation is correct, including another PhD student who had little to no ...


1

This advisor's "negligence" is an act of academic bullying. There is a few things one can do to counter academic bullying, but one has to think them thoroughly well in advance. I'm not writing them here, by now, since some advisors could read them to neutralize counter-bullying. Maybe you can get some advice from a union representative or someone ...


1

This doesn't sound particularly subtle to me. If your teacher is specifically rude to you in this way, I doubt it is going to be fruitful to raise the issue with her. Feel free to do so if you like; it might or might not work. In any case, this is what student reviews of teaching are for. At the end of the session you can give honest feedback and ratings ...


-6

Imitate her. This will upset her because imitation makes the other person confront his own acts, obligates them to self-reflection. E.g. look around the class as she does when you ask the question, take a long pause before you acknowledge understanding the answer. Play along with her/your assumptions about the question. Play the fool to catch the fool. E.g. ...


Top 50 recent answers are included