28

As far as I have ever seen, the length of your PhD program is irrelevant as far as considerations of future employers, etc. People (in academia) will mostly look at your publications, and possibly reference letters and reputation of your supervisor(s)/university. In particular, in all cases I know of seniority/age limits for grants count from date that your ...


25

I think that it would be unwise to include a copy of an offer in another application. But whether you inform them of the existence of an offer is a bit more subtle. I doubt that anyone will rush to hire you just because you have another offer. They will evaluate you on other things as usual. So, at best, mentioning the offer initially gets you nothing. ...


16

To be blunt and clear, if anyone had done this on any of the previous hiring committees I have been on, we would have rejected them instantly. They would not have even been long-listed, let alone short listed. Having another job offer is not a reason for anyone to hire you. Indeed, it indicated a number of negative things: You are the sort of person who ...


6

“Scholarly work” in academia generally refers to papers and books, with potentially other forms of formally released output (e.g., patents, or source code on a public repository) being included. In the sciences this expression is slightly quaint and not often used, but can be useful when one wants to speak not just about one’s published papers but about a ...


6

For sciences, scholarly work means peer-reviewed publications. Conference papers count if they are peer reviewed. In other disciplines, it can mean different things.


6

It asks you to define or list the resources needed for the project and show that you have considered where those resources may be obtained.


6

"Resources" generally means "money, and things that cost money". So: What resources do you need in order to carry out your research? This could include equipment, staff, students, travel funding, software, computers, books, use of specialized facilities, etc, etc. How are you planning to get those resources and/or the money to pay for them? Applying ...


6

In the US, university education is quantified as "credits" typically expressed as "credit hours" referring to 1 hour per week of instruction for a semester (so about 15-16 hours of face time). A course meeting 3X weekly would be worth 3 credit hours and is usually expected to involve an additional 6 hours weekly of work outside class. A 4 year bachelor's ...


4

Unfortunately there is no meaningful way to estimate your chances of being accepted into any specific program or set of programs (REU or otherwise), because selection is not strictly random, nor is the criteria uniform or transparently available to applicants. However, while REUs often mention the goal of increasing participation of minority candidates, in ...


4

I don't know where you are getting the idea that it is a longshot specifically for non-minorities. In general, REUs do have low acceptance rates for everyone. There are a lot of students who want to do them and not that many REUs. Now, to answer your question: yes, being female will likely help somewhat, but it likely won't make a big difference. What will ...


4

By and large, in the UK, MOOCs completion does not help your chances of admission; they are almost entirely ignored during the admission process. The only things that are considered are your results in your accredited degree programs. Paying for a certificate will not validate your MOOC participation in any way that Universities recognise; you should only ...


4

It is relevant, but only to second order. Your degree is your degree, what matters in academia is your publications, what matters in industry is your skills. Say you want to go further in academia. You will be judged primarily on the amount and quality of your publications. Clearly, if you did a 4-5 year PhD, you would have more time for research, and in my ...


4

I don't think Ben's answer says this strongly enough: Your statement must include a description of your past work, if you have any. The primary feature that PhD admissions committees looking for in applicants is evidence of potential for high-quality independent research. The strongest possible evidence of your potential to do high-quality independent ...


3

Part of the reason I would like to re-apply is that I do not want to feel like a failure down the road, which is admittedly not the greatest reason. "Feeling like a failure" when you got admitted into a good PhD program is absurd. Look at it from a broad perspective: only around 2% of the population in the US have a PhD, it's clearly not rational to ...


3

In my limited, but certainly present*, experience with history departments, your writing sample wont be used as a negative indication of language abilities. Your statement of interest and and language test/coursework proof will be noted, but if you have no Portuguese in your sample they are unlikely to notice. Your interests sound like a natural progression ...


3

It means something went wrong. It could be "an indication that I won't be able to reach her via this email address" or it could be something else. You should check the department webpage to see if it is the correct address. If so, wait a week or so and try again.


3

No, it should be valued equally through all the countries, especially in the Europe.In 1999 in Bologna the Ministers of Education of 29 have signed an act for European Higher Education Area. The main keys of it: European students and graduates would be able to move easily from one country to another with full recognition of qualifications and periods of ...


3

There is a reason why many countries ban explicit characteristics in job ads, and that is exactly to avoid discrimination. But you should check some examples of CV's for the country you wish to apply to. Also, applying as a foreigner is different than as a local. Check the universities site on that and you'll see the requirements, which might include proof ...


2

I will give some guidance for the US only. Here, you apply to a school or to a department. There is no need to contact professors beforehand. I would do so only if you have already set a research agenda and only a few professors would qualify to guide it. Most "blind" contacts are treated as noise by professors until you formally apply and are at least ...


2

Generally speaking you should see applications for the upcoming year open in mid to late October in the UK. This allows the admissions offices and administration offices to deal with the students who have made a September or October start before the floodgates open again. Regarding University-specific scholarships, you will gave to talk directly to the ...


2

I had a colleague (UK Lecturer in Computer Science) recently define scholarly work as academic work not involving any new ideas, but new presentations and synthesis of established knowledge. In particular, I believe they included: (text)books survey / overview / white papers on particular application domains, tools or research directions (to a lesser ...


2

It is more important that the letter writer can speak positively about your abilities and future prospects than it is what specific field they represent. Getting a letter from a statistics prof who doesn't know you wouldn't help much no matter their reputation. Go with letters from people who know and respect you and want to see you succeed.


2

Three thoughts: (1) It's hard to see how this is a conflict of interest if you have no role (even informally) in the admissions process. (2) Writing an applicant's personal statement for them is unethical. If you are advising students on the best strategies for dealing with particular individuals in your department, that also seems a bit like "insider ...


2

I would certainly include them all (the seven). Even more than the seven top tier ones. If you were an old hand in academia with hundreds, then you select. A young starter-upper should include a much larger fraction of the published work. Don't neglect that in CS, conferences are usually primary. But seven seems too few if you have more than 20.


2

This may be discipline-specific within engineering. Most of the top industrial engineering programs don’t interview PhD applicants (I can only think of one exception, though there are probably others). They’ll still bring folks to campus for a visit day or weekend though after they’ve been accepted.


2

I have not seen anything to indicate that PhD programs no longer interview candidates. I was interviewed in person by many (~75%) of the schools I got into for my PhD program in 2015. I doubt this has changed in 4 years. In fact, I helped interview several candidates in 2017 and 2018 at my school. I was invited to tour and interview at several well regarded ...


2

I am an American who did a PhD in the UK where they are very short. My colleagues in America who did a similar, biomedical engineering type PhD often took seven years whereas I was in and out in less than 4. My experience was that the UK system has somewhat adapted to this and a one or two year post-doc in the UK, in the same department you graduated from ...


2

The purpose of a PhD is to advance scholarship through the production of original research, usually embodied in a thesis. Every PhD research project is unique, and some take longer than others, especially if the researcher needs to acquire new skills for the project. Ultimately, achievement is measured according to the thesis itself, as well as other outputs ...


2

Disclaimer: I am not in a PhD program, but my wife is and she has brought this issue up before. I can only speak from what she's told me and from what I heard from my advisor when I was in my Master's program. (We are from the U.S.) There doesn't appear to be any hard and fast rule that shorter PhDs are worse, other than maybe less time to publish works and ...


2

At an R1 university you will still need to teach. Mentioning teaching in the cover letter is certainly appropriate, but a few words will do. It needn't even be as much as a full sentence since you get to expand in a teaching statement here. But a sentence that simply says you have wide experience in both research and teaching is probably enough for the cover ...


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