17

I would omit all the materials in your initial email, and just ask the lecturer a simple concise question: I would be interested in working as a teaching assistant for your course. Are there any openings, and if so, what is the procedure to apply? If not, do you know who I would contact about working as a teaching assistant for another course? There is no ...


13

While it might sometimes be possible to convert the funding from a PhD to a postdoc position, in general I don't think it's a good idea to apply as a postdoc for a PhD position. That being said, you can always contact the PI and ask whether they would have another position for a postdoc. Often, there are many more projects advertised for prospective PhD ...


10

It is not necessary to know a professor before applying for a PhD in the UK. I have so far supervised 8 PhD students, only one of whom I knew before they started their PhD. There are two routes to a PhD in the UK. First is to apply for an advertised position or program. This is how the majority of PhDs are recruited, but it is also usually only open to home ...


8

I am not an academician and I have little idea as to what to look for when hiring a lecturer, though I had the opportunity to sit through a few of those demonstration lectures from prospective candidates and also go through their feedback forms given to other lecturers. From this little insight, I believe that any experience is better than no experience. ...


7

Yes - having teaching experience can only be a plus, especially if you are applying to departments that fund many of their students through TAships. As a TA, you will spend more of your time in lower-level courses (such as calculus) than in higher-level ones, so it may be relevant. However, it's unlikely to be a deal-breaker when put up against your research ...


7

I think you are thinking of it backwards. You should use this offer to try to get an early decision from the other professor! You can say that you're very interested in their position, but you also have another competing offer. You could ask them to make a decision, or give you a timeline for when a decision would be made. Then, to the professor you have the ...


5

You are eligible to apply to any doctoral program, but acceptance is a different matter. Everyone seems to want to join a top university's doctoral program according to many questions here. Think about that for a minute. You have thousands of competitors for relatively few slots. Many, not all, top institutions have relatively small math programs. Like ...


5

Does it make sense to apply for such a position even if you already have a PhD, in the hope that they might also consider a post-doc instead? Yes, in general, this makes sense, because there is a chance that the position can be converted into a postdoc position. Whether that's indeed the case will depend on the nature of the funding. In some cases it will ...


5

I don't believe this will be beneficial, and has some minute chance of harming your application. Tutoring of high school students is relatively elementary, and is usually the kind of thing college or graduate students do to earn a little cash on the side. If you're already working in industry, taking on this kind of side gig might indicate that you're not ...


4

A US Bachelors degree generally would be accepted, but in your case, since your degree is from a TRACS accredited college, you may have a difficult time. For my US university (and most US universities), the policy for domestic applicants for graduate studies states: Students must have a bachelor’s degree from a college or university accredited by a regional ...


4

There are no strict rules on how and when one should respond to an informal offer (offers from academics are considered informal until you hear from HRs officially). Generally, you should treat professors as human beings and apply your best judgement. There is nothing wrong in asking how long you can consider the offer, e.g. Thank you very much for your ...


4

It is relatively difficult to arrange such internships. The applicants usually look for a 4-6 week period which is usually not enough time to get any meaningful output (except for the very strongest students), but still requires quite some preparation and supervision if done well. Then, often the visa issue is not resolved and the university does not usually ...


3

The main problem for you now is not COVID-19 but simply the summer holidays. If you are looking now, you won't find much. The number of job offers may increase again in September, October.


3

The good news is that you have a clear positive trajectory, and I'm assuming your undergraduate scores are quite good to get you accepted to the French MS program to begin with. In this case you have a high undergraduate GPA, and poor 1st semester MS GPA, and a good 2nd semester MS GPA. This is something you should put into your cover letter. ...


2

If you're planning to go into Academia, you might want to do a GTA (Graduate Teaching Assistantship) to get teaching experience. Because a GTA means approximately 20 hours per week on teaching duties, you may find it harder to work on your thesis or dissertation as much as you want. A GRA (Graduate Research Assistantship) will focus on research instead but ...


2

Ian Sudbery mentioned that a secondary route to applying to an advertised position is to find your own funding and then solicit supervisors. I suspect this varies by field, but I would suggest a third viable route, which is that you can contact potential supervisors without having funding. In some cases there may be university specific funding programmes ...


2

Probably a matter of opinion, but I would suggest focusing on more general things overall, though you could say that you have well developed ideas for a course in X and in Y. But I think that the teaching statement needs to focus on your teaching philosophy and expertise, rather than details. I say this because what you suggest seems to make you too narrowly ...


2

A single polite e-mail after a respectful amount of time (which varies greatly depending on field and whether you're talking about paper review or job application) is not likely to hurt you. Badgering, demanding, and aggression are likely to hurt you. Admissions and job hunts are probably the places where you might consider a follow-up e-mail as a way to ...


2

If you were given a deadline to accept or reject the offer, you should respect it. Otherwise you can wait a short time (a few days) before replying. If it is longer than that you need to find an explanation for your delay and ask for a bit more time to consider. Your situation isn't unique, of course. A few days delay is acceptable, but after a week your ...


2

I work at a Finnish university. My department established around April a moratorium that new hires could only begin their contract starting August 1st. There are also recommendations to avoid receiving visitors (and I guess new hires, but I'm not sure since I haven't attempted to hire anyone since earlier in the year) until the Autumn. We also have the ...


2

You should certainly list it, whether it is treated as a big deal or not. It won't have a negative impact. But if it is a formal course with evaluation and a grade, then it probably also shows up on your transcript. In that case, listing it again, probably has less value. But, in an application for grad study, you could list it as part of your motivation for ...


1

I cannot answer this for all of Western Europe, Scandinavia, and the US. Policies may differ between continents, countries, universities, and perhaps even departments. At my university, which is in a Western European country, there are currently 13 job vacancies for postdoctoral researchers. These are all specific positions in specific departments, so ...


1

Things are going to differ country to country, field to field and situation to situation but often PhD studentships are funded by outside funding bodies (this is not the case in the US interestingly). Those funding bodies are not primarily interested in the research that is produced from a PhD project, but in the education provided. All those PhD students ...


1

For the sake of efficiency and fairness, candidate selection is a purely administrative process, based on submitted paperwork only, and handled by academic staff that adhere to strict rules and work ethics. You should not disturb them, nor should you hope for any good effect of doing so. If you want to enhance your chances, then apply in parallel to other ...


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