63

I'll give the same answer as Allure, but for a very different reason. Not only is it common, but most people won't notice it. And of the few that do, fewer yet would think it an important enough issue to bother with. "Egad, this person misspelled a word. Horrors." Nope, it ain't gonna happen. But, you also need to be assured that no single thing, ...


20

I would say this depends on the department and their hiring practices, but in my department (math at a public US research university) applying early can definitely give you a leg up. In math in the US, there is a centralized application system (mathjobs.org) that most places use, and in my department all faculty get access to start looking at applications ...


17

Extremely unlikely. More organized institutions, and especially those with a culture of "procedural fairness", may enforce the stated deadline and resist considering applications that arrive after it. Certainly those that arrive significantly late, and possibly literally to the second. At others, the effective deadline is when the person in charge gets ...


16

No. Check this paper out. As of time of writing Google Scholar says it's received 3871 citations, which puts it well into the upper echelon of papers. And yet on page 50 there is ... To diagionalize the remaining four dimensions, we transform to a new set of variables Obvious typo, but it's far from uncommon and it doesn't stop people from reading and ...


11

I'll give a different answer, which is deliberately not an answer to the exact question you asked. Can you fix it? Can you overwrite your initial CV on the web application form, or ask the admissions administrator to replace it for you, or something like that? If so, then you should fix it, because you're trying to present your best self with your ...


11

The only applications that tend to be affected by time are those that arrive after the stated closing time. I have never heard of or seen any system of application sorting involving those who submitted first or last past the post. However, my experience is limited, perhaps it does exist somewhere...


9

A rather different angle on the question: From the way you phrased the question, I doubt that the deadline is three months away, and you are deciding whether to write the application now or to put it off and do some interesting research instead. Instead, I imagine that the deadline is very near, and the decision is whether to apply at all. If I am right, ...


8

Maybe this is field-specific, but designed polynomial time algorithm for graph isomorphism sounds to me like a completely CV-appropriate description of a project despite limitations on which graphs the algorithm applies to. CVs are never complete descriptions of work, and every work has limitations or assumptions that must be met. If anything, it ...


6

For the purpose of admissions it's unlikely to have any impact. If this were to support a job application, where a recruiter might have 500 resumes in front of them, and 95% of those resumes end up in the trash after one pass, you want to make every effort to prevent yours from being trashed, and every effort should be put into making sure your ...


3

No matter what you do, or how carefully you apply, a better job can always come up later. The decision you have to make is not "is this my perfect job?", because unless there's a specific single position that you have your eye on, there's no such thing; it's "is this position good enough that I'd take it if offered?". If it is, then do the interview, and ...


3

Given normal order of a search committee, submitting toward the end of the solicitation date should do you no damage as an applicant. There are variations from normal order. For example, a very strong candidate can turn up, and that candidate might be in a position to require an immediate decision, or some sort of fast track; a committee might develop a "...


2

I am a mathematician, and the optimal strategy is to wait with the application until the very last (with some comfortable margin in case of technical issues). This gives more time to do changes, and allow for inclusion of papers which change status (under review to being accepted, accepted to published, etc). There can also be personal changes (pregnancies,...


2

If it has been accepted then yes, include it, but mark it somehow (... abstract to be presented at ...). If it has been submitted, but not yet accepted, then you can include it under the heading of "work in progress". But there is no reason not to include such things. As you say, deliverables are important. But so is showing some continuity in your ...


2

I doubt that if I were reading the CV that I'd care one way or the other. If the award has a name or title, you should list that: Award/grant from IBM to support research in "glub-bending at the cusp". But adding the amount is also fine. My response to seeing the amount would be "interesting", but not "yay" or "nay". But the important thing, to me would be ...


2

Within the UK all degrees will have entry requirements for a course, and I expect this is the same throughout Europe although I suggest you check for yourself. As I dont know the exact situation for the entry, ie university or country, I will answer in general terms. Typical entry requrements are based on a progressive points system, where your previous ...


2

In the US this would certainly be unusual and at many universities, impossible. Admission to doctoral programs is done by a committee and there are cost implications for admitting a student. Space is needed, if nothing else. An individual professor, most places, has little control over that. You can ask, of course, and there is no issue with exploring ...


2

It seems as if you have done all you could. If they won't accept supplementary material, then they won't. I'm not sure about the comment on not reading letters, though. It seems like it would be a flaw in the system as long as the letters are in (readable) English. If you get past initial screening you can raise such thing in interviews or in future ...


2

Personally, I'd like to say I would ignore such a mistake, and indeed my eyes would likely skip it. But if I noticed it, it would raise my brows. I'd suspect that either you are not using a spell checker on an important document (which would make me think less of you), or you've ignored some warning given to you (and spell checkers in fact do give lots of ...


1

There are two main causes for incorrect spelling: You made a mistake, a typo, or you didn't know how to spell the word correctly. "mercandising" seems to be a typo. That's much more forgivable. Getting "your", and "you're" wrong would be more of a problem. I did review someone's CV before it was sent out and noticed "wether" was used instead of "whether". ...


1

Can the lack of credit based graduate coursework be a huge bottleneck in my future faculty applications? Can it be compensated by published works? I am not sure about positions at a SLAC or for a more teaching-oriented position, but for your run-off-the-mill tenure-track at a research university nobody will care in the first place what courses you took, or ...


1

We cannot update submitted applications with new SOP or CV or other information. Unfortunately, this means that you will not be able to update your application due to the regulations of admission. Thus, overthinking it will not help but to make you uncomfortable. Regarding to your situation, there are two possible scenarios I can think of: The ...


1

There is a power dynamic in the application process that any applicant needs to be conscious of. There are only a small number of positions for a large number of applicants, which grows to be a very large number at elite institutions. In other words, there is a significant power imbalance to the detriment of the applicant. The consequence of this is that ...


1

OP asks, will the spelling error be a "major issue for my application" MAYBE. The spelling error on the first page is evidence that OP might not have read their own paper prior to submission. That is demonstrative of a lack of attention to detail. Whether writing a simple email or important application, take the time to read it at least once to catch ...


1

It is common to include award values for research grants, including training fellowships, in a CV. Done with tact, I would see this as a positive and unlikely to be taken as arrogant.


1

I think that the only issue here is that you intend to change fields. You will need to show a US institution that you have adequate background in needed physics topics to begin advanced study. But you may be fine there also, depending on your course of study. The reason that the US degree takes longer is that it makes fewer assumptions about the candidate'...


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