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82

No, it would be inappropriate to report misconduct to a university if the misconduct has no relation to the university, except that the perpetrator was a student. If the misconduct occurred on campus, involved university equipment/resources, or involved an official supervisory relationship, then it might be reported.


55

I do not think the quick monetary outlay is common. You seem to be leaning toward acceptance and then backing out if you get a better offer. This may be possible because, in my experience, there is not a centralized system which lets other schools know you have accepted (although perhaps that could be different for Masters programs where you are using ...


28

Depending on how your department works there might be something you can do. People don't like their foibles and sins brought to light. Bad things happen in the dark. See the caveat, below, but if you have regular faculty meetings, you could raise the issue without naming anyone. "Students are complaining to me of racist/sexist behavior by some faculty ...


27

A signed offer letter is normally a valid contract. Usually it is the only contract document. Only someone who has read the offer letter can give you a perfect answer to this question. They have announced their intention to break the contract. That is illegal unless the offer letter says otherwise. Moving on is probably your best option. There are ...


25

I just want to answer just this part of the question: c) Let's say I decide to shell out my 5k -- would it be unethical for me to withdraw at a later date if I get into another school? They're not investing anything into me, and they get free money. if anything, it is (in my opinion) unethical for them to charge this much as a non-refundable deposit. ...


20

I don't know how it works in all countries, but in all cases, the university does not have the jurisdiction to investigate in such a situation. You accuse the PhD candidate of misbehaviour off-campus but this needs a process to be confirmed and only the police can start such a process. In Germany, such behaviour affects the PhD candidate when he wants to ...


17

This is not a forum for discussing legal questions, and in any case it seems to me that to try to pursue the matter through legal means would lead you down a rabbit hole from which your academic career would never emerge in one piece. As others have said in the comments, a postdoc position obtained through legal coercion is not one worth having. Since you ...


15

In my experience, such a report would only hurt your own reputation. If Bob the PhD candidate, damaged possessions of Alice, his flatmate, and keyed her car in non-university housing, and you report it to the university, it is highly possible to have the response "please report the incident to the police" in return. There are always many bilateral ...


14

I have had people I know who are senior mathematicians tell me in private conversation that they believe it is right and proper to discriminate in favor of females in mathematics in things like graduate admissions and job hiring. In some cases they essentially admitted (in a circumspect, plausibly-deniable sort of way) to practicing this kind of ...


11

I think whether to report this incident to the university, and how, depends crucially on the relationship of the flatmate to the PhD candidate and the university. If, for example, the two are both PhD students with the same supervisor or working in the same lab, this could be considered a workplace harassment issue. The flatmate should report it to their ...


10

Talk to someone in Dean of Students to help. Although the department head, dean, provost, etc. are supposed to help, the Dean of Students are the ones who can probably help you the most in this case. It’s their job to protect students from any form of harassment.


10

It is possible you were unfairly rejected. This is not really possible to prove one way or the other, from the information in your post. Unrelated to that, however, your post shows a lack of understanding for the standard justifications of affirmative action, and why admissions committees sometimes may try to improve the gender balance of their decisions. I ...


7

Turning down a teaching assistant position in your position is probably a very poor idea. The renumeration for working as a TA normally covers both the a stipend and your graduate tuition. If you do not have some other form of support (research assistantship or fellowship), you will have to pay your own way entirely. This is normally financially ...


6

The comparison you make is quite compelling, insofar as you both went to the same school, and have conducted similar tests/classes in your respective CVs, and there is no aspect (that you have mentioned) where her record is stronger than yours. I would recommend you take a careful look to see if there are any aspects of your girlfriend's CV that are ...


5

I know a univerity library that checks books upon return, because in the past students have copied relevant pages for themselves and then blacked out the information so that they could learn and have good grades but deny others of learning and getting good grades. So if the PhD candidate did this to sabotage the flatmate who is also a student at the same ...


4

a) Increasing common in oversubscribed programs, b) Very unlikely. I can’t imagine schools sharing admission details. Moreover, if baseball and basketball owners cannot collude, universities cannot either. c) It is never unethical to accept another offer. The University might not like it but if they want you it’s up to them to make a better offer. ...


4

They seem to claim that they aren't obligated, but that may not be a valid claim. But only a (local) lawyer can answer definitively. It might be worth pressing them outside the legal system, pointing to the letter. But a signed offer letter may be considered differently from a signed contract. There might be some emergency legislation that permits this or ...


4

You said that the funded PhD offer matches your field of interest. To me this already looks like a clear win over the unfunded Masters degree. The only point that could direct you towards the Masters is funding. So question 1: How necessary is significant grant funding for the research in your AOI? Question 2: How much funding does the advisor at the PhD ...


3

Surely this is a case of force majeure. The university made the offer in good faith but circumstances outside its control mean it cannot proceed with this offer. America, like many other countries, has closed its borders. If you are an American citizen, you have an absolute right of return if you can find a ship or a plane to take you there. America is ...


3

When the police investigation is done, and the person has receives a sentence, it might be appropriate to inform the university, but that is a job for the police, if the law in your country says so. In no way is it right to tell anyone else than the police about something like this. If you do, the university might want to do some investigations themselves, ...


3

If not explicitly forbidden by other stipulations this can indeed be perfectly acceptable and in your interest. However, my recommendation is to tread carefully. For example, doing so might be frowned upon by the department because they need TAs which can lose you significant goodwill. Or your supervisor disapproves because they think you are refusing an ...


2

How to support students who are/were being abused: Ask students how they are feeling and what they need. Tell them you care. Thank students for telling you about their problems. Just telling someone is scary. Tell students that abuse is wrong and should not happen at universities, but that sometimes it does happen. Tell students about resources available ...


2

I'd like to tackle a point of view that IMHO hasn't gotten the attention it deserves so far. Leaving legal aspects aside, IMHO transparency about exam procedure is very important for a good and healthy student - teacher relationship. The lack of transparency, but even more importantly refusing to announce the exam mode in future IMHO seriously undermines ...


2

From the Schools perspective its just a business decision. They make more offers than they have places for, knowing that on average not all offers will be accepted. Furthermore not all accepted offers will go on to study with the institution. The philosophy here on the part of the University, is to make offers to students who are willing to pay a $5k ...


2

The is a degree of randomness to these processes and factors that are unknown or not described in your post. Think of any logistic regression model that you might have seen. Some proportion of those predicted to be 1 actually are 0 and vice versa. It could be due to an excluded variable but it could be random. Are you both proposing to work with the same ...


2

Contrary to other answers I am not sure whether the university actually intends to act as badly for you as this letter looks. You where supposed to start in the middle of April and that is not going to happen. The university also doesn't know right now whether you could start in the middle of June instead or whether the situation will last for years so they ...


1

My personal take is to try to salvage something from this situation. I think, and as others answers here conveyed, that the university simply won't pay you right now if it can't. I would reply saying I understand the touch circumstances and their need to postpone the start of your employment. Suggest to postpone your start-date in the contract to June so ...


1

This diploma is a high school diploma with a focus on chemistry and industrial processes. As a "technological" baccalauréat it is designed for people who would like to continue with short-length studies (such as a trade school or something similar). It is not a university diploma. Do not be confused by the name: it is not related to a "bachelor", which ...


1

Adding this datapoint, which I interpret as saying the answer is yes, with caveats. Press release by the Dean of Students of the National University of Singapore When such offences are committed, the NUS Board of Discipline, which comprises student and faculty representatives, will also conduct its own disciplinary proceedings. It will consider ...


1

In the US it should matter very little. Having a closely related area in mind might be an advantage, but changing might not be much of any disadvantage, within limits. In fact, having too narrow an interest might make it difficult to find an advisor in the US. Some flexibility is suggested. Note that most beginning doctoral students in the US don't come ...


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