55

I don't see any problem with this. Something from your own country would be appropriate, as would a book that is important in your field. Even a tourist souvenir from your country as something to remember you. But not too expensive or elaborate.


30

Many U.S. schools (especially state ones) actually have written policies on gifts. Look for it on your school's intranet, or ask HR if you can't find it. They vary: I know at least one state school where any gifts, even a cup of coffee from a professor to a former student, are forbidden. Some schools have a cap on monetary value, like $100. You're unlikely ...


18

I went to law school in Australia, not the US, but I also had this experience --- that courses on contract law never involved reading any actual legal contracts, and that this latter exercise was almost completely absent from the whole program. Across my LLB and LLM, the only time we ever did anything like this was in a legal skills workshop in LLM (...


17

Honestly I don't have any valid reason, I did not pay attention earlier to my academic studies. But I think I can't mention that. What can be some possible reasons that I can tell him? On the contrary, if you think that was the cause, then that's exactly what you should say. Prospective supervisors are interested in a lot of aspects of candidates, and ...


16

Two-year degrees in the US often award either an "associates degree" or some technical certification/profession-specific degree. These degrees are not typically part of the "bachelors -> masters -> PhD" pipeline or more generic "bachelors -> professional degree". Some students may start taking courses at a 2-year school ...


16

Actually there are many reasons that contribute to this, though as noted it isn't universal. First, there is no real basis of comparison between courses, even in the same major, since the tests, unlike, say the GRE, aren't standardized, nor do they have enough data points for valid statistical inference. The numbers, if reported, would be essentially ...


15

Providing that you have done better recently, then the reasons you give here are fine. "I didn't pay attention early in my studies." People look for growth, not just excellence overall. In fact, that growth can be a strength. Just be honest, both about the past and more recent things. And focus on the ways you are prepared to move forward. Honesty ...


14

I'm going to write a second answer here, just to rebut a claim made in the other answers, which is the view that writing a commercial contract is just a trivial or routine matter once you know the underlying rules of contract law. That claim is totally false, and I do not think anyone with actual legal training/experience would believe it. There is a great ...


10

I think your question is: What does calculus mean? Calculus would usually include learning to compute derivatives and integrals. If you are learning to prove the theorems used to compute derivatives and integrals, that would be more advanced than calculus. linear algebra analysis 1, multivariable analysis, topology, group theory All of those would usually ...


8

I can't imagine an existing legal regime in which teaching from a textbook and "publishing" the lectures would be considered wrong unless the instructor explicitly made images or snippets copied from the book open to view. Likewise reading from the text verbatim would possibly be wrong depending on how much was read (fair use principles are ...


8

A community college or junior college in the US offers a program that is roughly equivalent to the first two year of a bachelor's program. The degree awarded on successful completion is normally called an Associates Degree. In most cases it omits the more specialized "upper division" courses that bachelor's degree students take in the last two ...


8

This probably means anything beyond the semi-standarized three introductory Calculus courses. Examples include: Differential Equations Linear Algebra Discrete Mathematics Probability Statistics Ring Theory Or basically topics that might consider Calculus as a prerequisite to performing well in the class. Classes that build a mathematical foundation to take ...


7

A single bad grade is unlikely to matter much. A history of bad grades is worrisome. Your application to a doctoral program needs to show that you have high likelihood of success in (math) research. This implies that you can demonstrate insight into areas of math that you want to specialize in. But insight in mathematics isn't uniform over sub-fields and ...


7

A bottle of wine is an excellent gift. You can pick up a decent wine for 30 dollars and attach a nice hand written note to it. Of course you also tell a short story about the wine when making the gift, I myself e.g. picked up a box of very expensive wine in Italy once. I gifted a bottle on two very special occasions. Regardless of what the more nerdy SE ...


7

As a Black graduate of Howard University, I think this best sums the factors and answers your question. The United States of America, has embedded within its socio-economic and political systems, systemic racism. The reasons for Howard University, in fact all HBCUs existence still remains. Until the systemic racism is directed to all OR until it is ...


7

The other answers are largely correct. For those with higher-academia goals, community colleges provide Associates Degrees, and opportunities to apply those credits directly to a later 4-year degree. The primary reasons students attend these institutions are (a) lower annual cost than 4-year schools, and/or (b) students who cannot satisfy 4-year college ...


7

Oh hey a copyright hypo in real life :) There are a couple questions that this question turns on. Is the lecture a derivative work of the textbook? Generally, the holder of a copyright also has rights to derivative works. Derivative works are works which are derived from another work. For example, if I sell a t-shirt with a drawing of Mickey Mouse on it, ...


6

I'm neither a lawyer nor a law student (which, judging by the score of answers written by people of similar credentials, doesn't bode well), but I'll try to extrapolate from my experience studying engineering because similar questions get asked in that field. From what I've heard, law school curriculums contain a lot of material and the programs are very ...


6

As far as the US is concerned, "Calculus" is the first introduction to the material. It typically is light on proofs and often geared to the Engineering Curriculum. In Germany (where I grew up) this material was partially high school, partially (in College) classes called ``Higher Mathematics for Engineers''. To get a more detailed idea, http://www....


5

In light of various clarifications, here's the bottom line for your current situation: You should definitely include this course on a list of courses you have taken "more advanced than calculus" for the purposes of US universities. And you should call it "Analysis" (or maybe "Real Analysis"), not "Calculus". More ...


4

One of the problems with gifts is that one does not want have liability of insinuation. Giving my Japanese students a gift, which has a cultural weight of something in return, is very different from giving one to an American student. There is not a clear answer to this question. Having said that, I've settled on giving my students the books that they used ...


4

Appointments to more permanent positions (like tenure-track or research faculty) are typically made by the university, not by receiving a grant. In other words, I cannot pay myself more simply because I received a grant with available funds. Depending on the university rules, postdocs may not be eligible to be a project PI, which may limit your ability to ...


4

I'd suggest two things. First is that you don't risk not getting tenure. So, keep doing the things that your current institution values and do them well. But to move on into a more research oriented situation, you can get yourself connected to others who do serious research and work with them as a collaborator and eventually a co-author. This can build a ...


3

It all comes down to the basic fact that university is not a trade school, regardless of the area of study. The distinction between Computer Science and Software Engineering that others mentioned is but another example. If law school were meant to be a trade school then a graduate should be ready to tackle the bar exam but that is far from the case, even for ...


3

The issue is most often not what happened a few years ago, but what has happened most recently. That is, what is the shape of the arc of your grades? Many people take some semesters to get in sync with math programs, and early troubles are not surprising. Grades of relatively recent, relatively basic courses matter quite a bit, though still not perhaps ...


3

You can get an idea of what constitutes "Calculus" by looking at the Calculus AP test. You can get an idea of "pre-calculus" with the UC admission requirements: Three years of college-preparatory mathematics that include the topics covered in elementary and advanced algebra and two- and three-dimensional geometry. A geometry course or an ...


3

US News and World Report has data from 697 ranked colleges. Of these: 544 schools (78%) reported that no graduate students were the primary instructor of any course. These include all except two "National Liberal Arts Colleges." The 10 schools with the most graduate students as primary instructor were all large public research universities. These ...


2

As @Buffy comments, the other answers do not seem so accurate about R1 and R2 grad math departments in the U.S. That is, funding is mostly as Teaching Assistants, administered through the department, not by individuals, and funding-and-admission decisions are also made at a department level, by a committee. Yes, having a faculty person ardently promoting ...


2

I think your question is: Why don't we rank students? Elite universities only accept the top few percent of eligible students. If elite universities ranked their worst students, those students would choose to enroll at a lower ranked university where they could get a better rank. Soon, elite universities would have fewer students. Elite universities don'...


2

Their law firms must have templates or boilerplates As a matter of law, written contracts do not need to follow any templates or boilerplates. In fact, most contracts do not need to be in writing in the first place. Where there is a written form, that is only evidence of the contract, not the contract itself. Not only most existing contract templates/...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible