33

One possibility is that if you did want to do a PhD later on, you'll find it much harder to get back into a one if you dropped out of one already. Also, I've found there are usually many more positions available for master's students than PhD students at a University. For a Masters's, space is usually limited by space in lecture halls, while PhD's are hard ...


23

As a general principle, ceteris paribus, if you have the choice between offers of an instructor position at an elite institution versus a tenure-track position at a non-elite institution, I would think that the latter is a bigger stepping stone towards a faculty position at an elite institution. The main reason is that a tenure-track position will have a ...


17

I suspect that there are a lot of factors. One is that there are a lot of universities in the US that have masters programs, but no doctoral program. Some of their masters students just continue on from a bachelors at the same place. A second factor is that there are more needs out there for education and "mad skilz" than you might expect. Programs ...


12

I think there is no formal guarantee of a minimum salary, but, equally, it is my impression that in the U.S. there are few situations in which faculty have any formal contract whatsoever. For better or for worse. University administrations can unilaterally "furlough" people, or reduce salaries, for whatever reason they wish. As (perhaps not ...


10

I just retired and started an MS program. Why didn't I apply to the Ph.D. program? Admission to the local Ph.D. program is highly competitive. The MS program, not so much. The requirements for the MS degree are not onerous, no prelims, no qualifiers, I only have to find one other referee besides my final project advisor, i.e. no putting together a thesis ...


9

My opinion is that teaching experience is beneficial for almost any profession and will almost always be seen favorably. My own teaching experience taught me a lot: Public speaking/presenting Thinking on the spot/critical thinking You need to assess and evaluate your own knowledge When your approach doesn't work as expected for some students, you need to be ...


8

Very, very few assistant professors in the sciences in the USA have ever been instructors. Some instructors have gotten promoted to a higher rank within their university, but it was not called "assistant professor." There can be a separate system of ranks. If you like teaching, either "instructor at major university" or "assistant ...


7

One thing you can surely do is take a math course improve your skills, so that you can then be accepted into the Statistics course. Unfortunately, as the saying goes, there is no royal road.


7

Consider the example of Stanford. It is significantly easier to get into the MS program there than the Ph.D. program. So, if you can only get admitted to the MS program, and think it will help your career enough to be worth the money, then you might choose that route. I think companies will sometimes pay for all or part of a master's degree. Other ...


6

In addition to the other answers: People pay for expensive masters degrees because they have been tricked by clever university marketing. This is the same as other expensive unnecessary purchases, like oversized, inefficient vehicles. Many people think you have to pay for a PhD. Many masters programs exist only to generate revenue.


5

Just going to add another perspective here for people pursuing a masters degree while working. It may be more financially advantageous to pay for a Masters instead of quitting for a year to work on a PhD. Just to give an example, let's say I'm offered a $33k/yr stipend to pursue a PhD. One option would be to quit my job to get a PhD, but drop out after a ...


4

This sort of visa waiver has restrictions because it is not a visa that allows you to work. "Conducting research" is work. "Observing" research or learning how to research isn't work, it's learning/education. Generally, laws that limit activities granted to foreign visitors are intended to protect labor: both to prevent jobs from being ...


4

While there is probably a minimum for any given institution and you wouldn't be reduced below that for any reason, future salary increases depend most places on performance. There might also be a maximum. The limits might change from year to year, generally moving upwards for various reasons, such as inflation and cost of living. And there are wide ...


3

Taking on a PhD student is a serious, multi year commitment that many professors would not make before getting to know the student and gaining an appreciation for their abilities and personality, for example by having them do a research project under the professor’s supervision for a semester. By contrast, having a couple of meetings with a student, ...


3

We are missing a lot of detail from the question, but: assuming "out" means one of LGBTI you are not seeking a PhD in religion Then the usual cultural expectation is that someone's LGBTI identity is not shared without their consent. Occasionally people do things that are unexpected. In the current climate, at the average university people might ...


3

There are no guarantees, but it can help at the margins if you do a good job. The issue is that most "relatively well-known" universities are bound by rules that require a public, national (at least) search for tenureable faculty. You would need to apply and be judged along with others. It is possible for a department to write an publish a job ...


3

There is no single definition of what being an advisor means and entails. The one common thing is, well, the advising part. Apart from that, advisors don't have to do anything (this might depend on the country, at least in Germany being an official PhD advisor means first and foremost just that, all the rest is optional). So from what it sounds like your ...


2

What you describe might happen, but would be rare. Probably very rare. Doctoral applications in the US are normally handled by a committee on which faculty will serve for a few years. But every system is different. The request for names is more likely to be the case of wanting to get a sense of the load on faculty that would be required overall by an ...


2

Since you really need some advice on this, let me jump in. The comments are all worth considering but don't answer the question. Yes, in the US, medical care is good, but financing for it is poor. Very poor compared with some parts of Europe. University employment normally comes with medical insurance that is "fine" by US standards, but maybe not ...


2

No. The Council of Graduate Schools is a nonprofit organization; it has nothing to do with degree validity. While it's true that most reputable graduate schools are members, it does not follow that all non-members are non-reputable. Moreover, there is no clearcut definition of a "valid" degree in the United States. The closest thing is probably ...


2

No, it isn't going to hurt. Research that is published is not going to hurt any application in the US. It is going to help. And, collaboration is a valued skill in CS so that, too, is in your favor. Even unpublished research mentioned by a letter writer is a plus. All such things are indicators of future success. And get the supervising professor to write a ...


2

As a fairly substantial long-term data point(s)... from my being involved-in and observing grad admissions at a big state univ: At my univ, the central admin people hardly look at applications, to begin with. Documents and info are entered into the system by a certain few people, but those are just data-entry people, and I'd be surprised if they looked at ...


2

It will depend on a lot of things. Of course it is not going to be a big jet assist to your getting in to a big-name school. But it's not impossible. Sometimes the less prestigious schools are not bad, they just don't shine quite as brightly. In Canada, for example, if you do very well in an undergrad physics degree from nearly any school you can usually get ...


2

OK, first take a deep breath, relax a bit, and focus on what you can do about the situation. Students changing advisors (for many different reasons) is not all that unusual - any reasonably sized department will have this happen every year or so. First, based on a comment you made, your advisor will help you 'if needed'. Fine, but you have work to do as well....


2

University managing bodies are rarely committed strongly to academic traditions and ethos, and will gladly chip away both at your tenure - collectively and individually - and your employment conditions, salary and otherwise. Whatever guarantee you may have - if it is not upheld vigorously and in an organized fashion, it will disintegrate and be lost; and ...


1

There are a lot of things to consider and ranking probably shouldn't be at the top of your list. IMO, the supervisor trumps the university ranking by a lot. If you have someone helpful and skilled you will likely do well. And if they are also known, they can give you a boost in your later career. But the country of the institution might also matter a bit. Do ...


1

Faculty in the US are covered by university policies, their contracts, including a letter of offer of a position, state law, and Federal law. Federal law and any state law specifies a minimum wage. The minimum wage law applies to all employees, including tenured faculty. So yes, there is a minimum wage for them. Some faculty are expected to raise all of ...


1

There's no standard process for this. I strongly suggest you talk to your director of graduate studies first to get a sense of the approximate process, not just for the issue of declaration of PhD advisor, but the whole process of completing the PhD program. Most PhD programs are not very formal when it comes to "declaration of PhD advisor", until ...


1

For smarter peoples, getting into a PhD program with the intention to leave with a Master's degree (MPhil maybe?) is, simple put, not profitable. We're not even considering the fact that PhD positions are scarce and require significant devotion and perseverance to. PhD programs usually spans across 5 years or more, and it's rare that you can "quit as ...


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