35

First, adjuncts get paid almost nothing unless they have exceptional skills in some narrow field. Skills far beyond those of the typical recent PhD graduate. Those who try to live on adjunct pay have an impossible schedule and are unlikely to have health, etc., benefits. However, some people I know, have made a success at it because the money means little ...


35

Unless you are independently wealthy, you should never take an unfunded offer for graduate school in mathematics. Even before the pandemic, some people with a dozen good papers after two successful postdocs - a well above average publication rate - were failing to find jobs. When I was last broadly applying for academic jobs 10 years ago, the general advice ...


30

Generally speaking, there’s no need to accept an offer as soon as you receive it. Offers have a standard deadline for you to respond. It is normally somewhere on your offer letter. It’s absolutely fine to make further inquiries with HR or one of your prospective advisors regarding funding opportunities: Can I apply for financial assistance? Are there any ...


15

For the most part habilitation is restricted only to Europe. No real equivalent exists in the United States or other parts of the world. The closest equivalent in the United States would be a promotion after tenure and before reaching a (Full) Professor rank. At many institutions I know, however, there would not be such a rank because the jump to Associate ...


8

How is European habilitation considered in the US? It is considered a foreign custom with no relevance to the US.


6

I just read a couple of your posts about how you interact with your students. Sensitivity training isn't optional. The people who will be voting on your tenure think you have a problem. Frankly, I agree with them.


4

Yes, you absolutely can! The win-win is very unlikely though. Students won't see lower tuition or anything, and will have no opportunity to interact with anyone at the faculty level (so no letters of recommendation, no research jobs, etc). Professor lines will be closed on retirement (or through layoffs) because who needs them, we've got McGraw-Hill ...


4

If your ideas were fleshed out experimental plans that someone else took and used, that's not cool. You should complain. If your ideas were a bunch of "wouldn't it be great to study this topic" thoughts, that's just not enough to stake a claim. If the PhD student is acknowledging that you're also in that area I wouldn't complain. You should ask her ...


4

No, in general 'Not Mandatory' doesn't mean 'Mandatory', also not in the 'current climate'. However, in your case, given the advice of your chair and dean, I'd say it would be unwise not to go to these trainings. You could even gain something, both in the sense that you learn something and in the sense that you will get in a better view from the chair and ...


4

An up-front comment: This answer has managed to attract a fair number of downvotes, as well as several very helpful follow-up comments (which have since been moved to chat). One hypothesis offered by a commenter for why so many have chosen to cast downvotes is that my answer maybe too focused on just one field (economics, which happens to be my field) while ...


4

tl;dr: Agreeing to work for free hurts your colleagues. Don't. Graduate-level research is important work, which benefits society, the academic institute and the PI/advisor/lab/research group. It merits reasonable compensation - similarly to how you would expect payment seeking other work based on your undergraduate degree. In many places the term "...


3

Habilitation is not a term in common use in the US, but if the Wikipedia article is accurate about the meaning, then it would seem that a holder would likely be eligible for a faculty position at one of the lower ranks: Assistant Professor or Associate Professor, perhaps. But the holding of it, alone, wouldn't likely be enough. It would further depend on the ...


3

Yes, you can ask. But they will probably say no if they require/request it. Someone has to give a meaningful analysis of your transcript and they are probably deferring this to WES so as not to have to have people do it themselves. It is a fairly large problem for a large institution and maybe a difficult one for a small institution. But, in general, there ...


3

(1) Should I work for a professor in experiment(from my school) (particle physics or condensed matter) from May 2021 - August 2022? I am willing to volunteer with no pay. (2) Should I work for a professor in theory (from my school) from May 2021 - August 2022? (3) Should I ask a mathematics professor (from my school) for informal mentorship from May 2021 - ...


3

Leaving the masters unfinished isn't a huge problem. But moving from a Life Sciences Doctorate to Engineering is a big step and would need a lot of justification. You don't say which university in Europe so it is hard to guess at their reputation. I won't predict that it is impossible, but I think you will have a hard time convincing people unless you have ...


3

Well, in the Academia world you can still find some decent people: "Stop exploitation of foreign postdocs in the United States" (from Nature, the mighty, revered and belated publisher ) Although the downvote and the comments you will receive to your question will be rather low quality: you are questioning the patina of excellence that a lot of ...


2

You seem to have some misunderstandings about undergraduate education in the US. A bachelors here provides a general education along with a specialization. The general courses are about 40% or more of the total. For example the CS program at UIUC seems pretty typical to me. Note the wide variety of courses, including the humanities. UIUC is a highly ranked ...


2

I would do a couple of things. First, see if you can quickly organize a different recommender. Maybe futile, but it might work. Long term it might be useful to have a backup in any case. Second, but simultaneously, inform the university to which you are applying that you can't reach the recommender and that Covid may be the reason. Tell them you have a copy ...


1

Talk to your current professors. Assuming US, it's too late to apply for most good PhD programs this year. The academic job market in philosophy is worse than abysmal. You should assume you will not find a permanent academic position. Moreover, the data suggests that your chances are even worse if you do not attend a top program - though it's not at all ...


1

It is unlikely to make a difference at that level (GT vs ETHZ). But note that a MS isn't required for entrance into a doctoral program in the US. I'd guess that if you can get into a masters at Georgia Tech you could probably also enter their doctoral program directly. There is lots of competition, though and most of it is from highly recommended and well ...


1

This will vary widely from program to program (so much so that this question is borderline "off topic" in this forum), so your best bet would be to discuss this with members of the department where you are thinking of applying (even/especially students). Still, some thoughts... I feel that I may lack some of the more general knowledge that would ...


1

Such a paper can't hurt and might help. CS is a pretty wide field with both theoretical and applied aspects. Your paper seems to describe applications. That would be more of a boost in some programs than in others. But in the US, doctoral admissions is based on a wide variety of things, including letters of recommendation. Your co-author(s) may be able to ...


1

What I saw was that becoming a TA is more likely than funding. Especially at the end of a year when they try to sign up TAs for the next year. You get a part time job with just enough to survive on while living near school and finishing your degree. The other more common situation was people working in EE and going to school for one or two classes that ...


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