369

this may sound immature And it is. You're acting as if you have the right to do what you want. You don't! It's a teaching session in a building owned and run by other people and they set the rules and delegate the authority. You have two legitimate choices (1) obey the rules and the authority or (2) leave. If you want to protest the rule, contact your ...


283

I don't feel that general academic ethics obliges you to report this, unless you have reason to believe that it might be endangering the research of the lab (giving inaccurate results, introducing viruses to lab computers, etc). You will have to make your own judgment as to whether you are obliged to report by any of the following: your own personal code of ...


269

I don't really think this is odd: they have been asked to send the assignment by email and they did. There isn't really a need to say anything further and they didn't. Maybe it would be slightly more courteous if they were to add a couple of words of greeting, but your job is not to be Emily Post. If the assignments were submitted on paper, and they left ...


237

The good thing (maybe the only good thing) about email is that it's by nature asynchronous. A phone call in the middle of the night is intrusive, because there is an explicit expectation that the receiver does something about the call right there and then. An email is not like that - if you send an email, it will happily sit in the inbox of the recipient ...


232

It sounds extremely rude, I am afraid. I would assume mitigating circumstances for a non-native speaker, but the "no thanks" permits "thanks" to be interpreted as substantive, and thus has a highly dismissive connotation which should never be used with your superior, and neither with a friend you would like to keep. The connotation that shines through (at ...


231

To me, this is such a non-issue that it doesn't warrant much of a response. So let me add a response :) I didn't mean to imply carelessness, and I am sorry if that's how my email came across. I was a bit overzealous in my email. I will address the errors in the skeleton program in my solution, as you have indicated. Thank you for your detailed response! ...


213

As my experience of being a TA for multiple courses with various profs, such personal gestures of appreciation are welcomed by the professors. I have actually heard professors refer to the email as something that "made their day". As long as you don't refer to your grades, I don't see a reason why someone would misjudge your intentions, especially after the ...


196

Talk about the work. Stick to the facts. Clearly and bluntly stating the limitations of a result is fine, but criticism of a researcher during a research talk is completely inappropriate. Your expression of surprise could be taken as criticism of either the researcher's ethics or their competence, neither of which is appropriate to air in front of a ...


195

Actually, it is simple courtesy to accept as soon as you know you will do so. This helps the institution deal with its obligations to you and others. It isn't a game you play for "advantage". You hope to develop a long term relationship with this institution. Treat them with respect and expect them to reciprocate. Don't accept before you are ready, such as ...


183

Does your institution have a student dress code? Does your location have public indecency laws? If their clothing violates either, refuse meetings until the problem is corrected. Otherwise, ignore their appearance and carry on as usual. Their sense of appropriate dress is clearly different from yours, but like political or religious opinions, such senses ...


182

"We encourage all participants - male and female" There is no need to look into it further than that. They encourage you to come and you want to go. I don't see any reason why you wouldn't want to apply.


181

I would stay away from his "personal laptop" in the future and avoid peeking at other people's "very personal" screens. It is not your job to report this. And you should not be looking at other people's screens. He decided to use the software on his personal station, not on the resources of the university, so it is none of your concern. It is a typical "none ...


177

You address this by stating directly "I would prefer not to discuss this topic during office hours. Can I help you with any questions you have on the homework?" If the issue persists, I would speak with the professor and perhaps also your dean of students (or something similar).


172

Professors both young and old are known to use dating apps. So do students, doctors, engineers, lawyers, dental hygienists, and any other kind of person. In other words, there is nothing about being a professor that disqualifies one from using dating apps (or that makes one a special kind of human being in any other way, contrary to what seems to be the ...


161

It's your decision what to write, but to my mind, adding a note trying to explain your preferred pronouns seems like it puts the emphasis on something which you probably don't want to make the focus. I'm young enough to be fairly familiar with this stuff, but I have to be honest, the thing I'd remember after read your paper would be "Huh, I've never seen ...


151

In short, how can I tell these girls, politely, that they should think twice about showing up half naked to meetings with faculty members? I can think of 4 situations: If they are violating a university dress code, you should politely remind them of the policy. If they are not in violation of a university policy, but their appearance makes you feel ...


150

You are wrong for putting the name of someone on a paper and submitting it without asking them for permission. Having them as an author communicates to the world that they approved the content and agree with the conclusions. Implicit in that is that they signed off on the manuscript. Some people get angry when this happens even if the paper is fine and they ...


150

I have heard from women (in mathematics departments, in the US) that they prefer not to be addressed as Ms or Mrs. The issue is that some students address their male professors as "Dr." or "Professor" but their female professors as "Ms." or "Mrs." Perhaps you don't do this, but I would still recommend "Dr." or "Professor" unless your professor encourages ...


148

The problem is as @WetlabWalter says: the medal is not just for you - it is for everybody that supported you and, in fact, indirectly for your class, and lecturers. You have a good reason (for yourself) to decline it, which is commendable. But you might offend those who recommended you, those who taught you (who would be indirectly honoured) and possibly ...


140

Get over yourself. This isn't about you. And this isn't really even about your work. This is about a community celebrating its own values, by recognizing the individuals that best represent those values. "True scholars" don't exist in a vacuum. We are part of a community of scholars. We use resources created by that community, most obviously in the ...


140

It sounds like you've agreed to write a letter so I think you are committed unless the student releases you from your commitment. (Personally, I'd have said no in the first place and explained if asked that, based on their behavior, I could not honestly give a favorable recommendation. But that ship has sailed.) But what you haven't agreed to yet, I hope, ...


131

The benefit of recommendation letters is that they give insight into abilities that are not reflected in the rest of your application. Your grades and your publication are already in your application. A professor who doesn't know anything else about you has nothing to write that will help you. To directly answer your question: it comes across more naïve/...


130

The existing answers seem to me extreme. I don't think some sort of draconian blanket "leaving-the-room policy" is needed here. I would suggest the following: For students leaving occasionally: Ignore it. They are adults and sometimes things in their lives may take higher priority than your class (e.g. going to the bathroom, feeling unwell, family ...


128

TL;DR: If in doubt, leave it out. In talks, avoid anything that can offend or be misunderstood, especially if you do not know your audience. It is ok to make self-deprecating jokes, but you want to keep the atmosphere somewhere between serious to light (depending), but outside the sentiment of sadness or anger if you do not have political ambitions. Your "...


126

Absolutely. It helps, though, to be a little context sensitive. If you've just come from an amazing presentation and want to talk about it to someone else, then "did you just hear that great talk by/about X?" is a good way to start the conversation, better than just "Hello" or "Great conference, eh?" If you know who the person is (they're speaking, you ...


124

You can ask, but it's really none of your business. Admissions committee deliberations are generally treated as confidential. Asking about the other candidates and why they were rejected will almost certainly be seen as intrusive. It's the kind of thing that's likely to cause them to wonder how they made the mistake of choosing you over all those other ...


124

Yes, you are definitely welcome to attend. Looking at previous workshops in the "Young Women in..." series, you can see from the photos that some of the participants appear to be male.


124

would be advisable to add a note that the implementation of THEIR algorithm is our implementation Absolutely yes. This provides important context for your experimentation and as such, is valuable information for the reader. Even better, you could make your implementation of their algorithm publicly available, so that future groups of authors will not ...


123

Work with both John and Sam on the same paper. You all have something to offer, so pool your efforts and work together.


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