Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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Honestly, without putting down. Explain the weaknesses of their approach or profile, explain what they would have to change in your opinion to get where they want and explain what they can do if it does not work this way. The point is not discouragement, but letting them understand what their options are. Some people are able to rise far above their ...


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It would depend, perhaps, on how you characterize your "gap" to a future potential employer. If you treat it as a negative that might be easily picked up. But needing to unwind after an intense five years is pretty normal. Wanting time to publish is a positive thing. Wanting to continue current productive relationships is also a good thing. So, ...


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To answer your question, according to some, the best time to negotiate is after an offer has been given by the potential employer. For one thing, they have already ruled out other candidates and they have now essentially decided on giving the position to you. The hiring process is arduous from their perspective as well and the last thing they want to do is ...


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Think about your audience. They are asking this question because they want to know how you'll contribute to the teaching of the department. Only listing the title of the course would provide a little information (what you'll teach), but probably not all of what they're listening for (how you'll teach or how your teaching interests will fit in their ...


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First, you should be aware that on-campus CS faculty interviews have already started. Yes, yes, I know that even the earliest application deadlines are still several weeks away, but at least in some departments (like mine), stellar candidates can be (and have been) invited to interview well before the application deadline. That said, you should not worry ...


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There's obviously not a single answer to this question. How many papers you have published may dictate to whom you send the CV, but how you write it is something different. You can always try to apply for a position as you are, or you can try to do a post-doc and get some more publications. Other than that, the CV advice is the same as any CV. Emphasize ...


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Advise the researcher of their options beyond their current trajectory, discuss the differences between trajectories, and establish what they really want. (Just because a research says they, want a permanent academic position in five years and professorship ten years after, doesn't mean they've thoroughly considered and understood what this will entail!) The ...


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The conference window is pretty small. I'm not sure why you'd be concerned. You should get, from any reasonable institution, some leeway in scheduling an interview. I think that is especially true in a case like this. Even more so if you were presenting, though you don't indicate that you are. And it might even turn out that some institutions will also ...


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