5

Yes, you can include them, but it is unlikely that they will count for much unless you get a chance to answer questions about it in an interview. The problem is that there is no real independent verification of what you have learned. You need to ask yourself whether you have really learned as much as if you had taken a course under the guidance of a ...


3

The problem with such online courses is that it is very difficult for an admissions committee to verify that you actually learned anything. If you work hard at such a course and do at least as much as the course requires then you might learn something useful, but it is very difficult to equate such a "credential" to a proper university course. So, ...


3

Unless your university specifically confers an honor, you don't hold it.The three typical Latin honors have different meaning in different universities, if they have any meaning at all. And, 2.96/4.0 would not be considered very high if earned in a US university. But that last bit means nothing as the systems are very different and grades are assigned very ...


3

Since I have worked in India after completing my Bachelor degree for 2 years and further joined a university in Germany for pursuing Masters and subsequently doing PhD at the moment, I feel that I have been in somewhat similar shoes as you are. I would recommend following things from my experience. please take it with a pinch of salt as it may vary on case ...


3

I am not in the US, but I don't think that mentioning this will be "frowned upon" as if you were having an unfair advantage in relation to the other candidates. You are not doing anything wrong or illegal by doing your undergrad research there: I actually think it is an advantage, as it shows you're motivated by the subject. If I were a part of the ...


2

My advice is that you should certainly mention it. I suspect that if you apply to some other university you would certainly want to mention your undergraduate research. You should do just the same for admission to your own graduate program. It would be expected, I think. If this is for doctoral study in the US, note that professors do, in fact, get involved ...


2

The experience of working under a well-known professor will impact positively on your profile, and is generally quite valuable for graduate applications. However, you need to take a call on whether the effort you put in is worth the result, and whether this is the only avenue for you to improve your profile. You say that you're not a US citizen and this is a ...


2

Having an existing PhD is unlikely to affect universities' or supervisors' willingness to take a PhD student, if they can pay their own fees. However, it is likely to prevent her from getting funding for a PhD. Many funders have rules against this. Re COVID: This is anecdata, but I think scholarships have become scarcer this year as universities become ...


1

I honestly don't think you are going to have much trouble finding a good doctoral program. But, I have two suggestions to help maximize success, other than continuing to do well in your studies. First, make sure that you, and your skills, are known to at least a few faculty members. If you haven't yet cultivated relationships with potential letter writers, ...


1

Yes, it would be better to have some very-tangible evidence of your self-study, for example to have some faculty vouch for you... but, as we know, this is not always possible. From a U.S. math perspective: simply tell the textbooks (with authors!) you've read, and on-line notes you've read, etc, without much further comment. From my viewpoint, as a long-time ...


1

it was a late application. It means it went into the bin "if we really need to fill the position, and we have no other candidates, let's consider this applicant, too" they communicated to me that they did not have time to review my case They did not review your case. and they wanted to keep it for the next round. They keep it just in case they ...


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