7

I've had experience with similar issues and in my opinion, honesty is the best policy assuming that your advisor is a reasonable, non-vindictive person. If the issue is just the topic and the area, and not your advisor personally, then they probably want what's best for you and could actually help you out in working out the details (perhaps offering you an ...


7

These kinds of mistakes happen all the time. Don't worry about it, just move on -- the people who will read the letters understand that these things happen.


5

Can't give you a generic answer, but here is my particular situation: I am an assistant professor in the Netherlands. Contacting me to pursue a PhD is futile, since I have no funding at the moment to host PhDs. If such funding would become available (which can happen at any time; there is no rhythm to this), positions will appear on my university's ...


4

My pet peeve as a reviewer is authors that ignore reviewer comments. If you were asked to revise the paper and did not listen, that's a desk-reject in my book. Part of the scientific method is the ability to improve one's work based on peer review. If you cannot do it for whatever reason, then expect a series of rejection. Is it possible that my paper is ...


4

TLDR IMO (and based on classic answers of the Workplace Stack Exchange): Never inform your current employer of your intent to leave until your new employment is 100% secure. Adding to @Spark's excellent answer, I would make a few recommendations based on my conversations with other graduate students in similar situations. Make sure that your place in the ...


4

You apply for a Study visa for a purpose of studying for a fixed term. This visa does not allow you to stay longer than the term of this study. After the end of your studies you should return to your country (even if your studies are completed or terminated before the expiration of your Study visa). The question asks you to affirm that you are familiar with ...


3

You can ask, but it is unlikely that you will get a decision and maybe not even a reply. Processes will be followed in fairness to all candidates. Rules probably prevent any early decision in most places.


2

This answer is based on Australian observations. Most Phd students at a university are selected from honours students within the same department, and sometimes the honours students are accepted with the hope they will prove to be a good Phd candidate. I have seen one average undergraduate student accepted for honours - but they had a high grade in the one ...


2

I'm a math major. I have taken a few graduate level math classes, computer science and statistics classes, and science classes (psychology, biology, chem, physics). I have a 3.9 GPA. I'm not seeing the problem; a 3.9 GPA (with grad classes, no less) by itself will open some doors. Math in particular is much more focused on classes and grades than some of ...


1

It seems that the offer provides several advantages over your current position. Thus, it is a good idea to move. Just make sure to explain clearly to your supervisor why you are leaving so that s/he could understand your decision. Try to stay in good terms. Also, if you can tell your supervisor a little bit in advance that you will leave and if you can ...


1

Honestly, if I were in your shoes, I would just be upfront about it with my advisor. It seems very clear from the text that moving to the other country would benefit you immensely and I believe that your advisor would both see and appreciate that. I have a question for you however - how come you got another PhD offer while you were on the verge of finishing ...


1

The comment of astronat is good. Most people would support you. But there is more. If you are happier, then you will probably do better work. Being in something that you aren't happy with is not good place to be. If there is any sort of retaliation it would be, I think, short lived and can be overcome. Other than lying, the person has no real way to say you ...


1

The bad thing: Your Phd is yet nothing, it is a plan what you say. If you apply for a visa extension because you are a running Phd course, yes that is something. The students lie because they fear the rejection of their visa. Particularly the USA is infamous in this sense. The German authorities know it very well, more clearly the responsible officers know ...


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