9

Every teacher, course, group and situation is different but these are things that worked for me (Europe, teaching unmotivated and diverse group of undergrads): Keep external teaching material (books, software) to a minimum Give regular feedback on progress (I usually start every class with a short, very basic quiz about the lass classes (self-corrected by ...


5

I'm sure that this varies from country to country, but I think a lot of grants (and universities) will let a researcher "buy out" of some sorts of teaching using grant funds. Fewer will let you buy out of all teaching, since that would defeat one of the main missions of a university. But, buying out of an undergraduate class might be possible. I'd ...


4

What works for me: Create a set of exercises that cover a wide range of skills, from elementary/introductory ones to challenging ones (some of which may require literature or even own research). The students not only get an entry point into what you wish to teach, but they also can see where it leads, and the strong/experienced ones are not bored. What's ...


3

My suggestion is to ask the client if they are comfortable with you asking their advisor for guidance, which of course makes your participation visible. If they won't do that, then I'd guess that they want to use you improperly. But, if they are willing to keep the advisor in the loop then it also allows for each case to be handled individually and in the ...


2

This isn't a complete solution, but only something to think about, depending on how free you are in course design. I think it complements the answer of Captain Emacs to some extent. I once taught a database (CS) course to a group of very able students at a top university. Almost all were very good, but not all had the same background preparation. There were ...


2

Indeed this depends on the country. The answer is mostly that Europe has grants like this moreso than North America in my experience. I don't know about other continents so I will focus on what I know below: In the USA, the way grants from the NSF often work is through providing summer salary. I haven't seen much there. On the other hand, UK Research and ...


2

It is entirely possible but (as you can imagine) such grants are not so easy to get. Basically, it depends on the rules of the grant. There are some “non-traditional” grants that are designed for this: basically the amount of the grant pays for buyouts and the scholar must produce some report at the end of the grant periods. Some think tanks contract ...


2

I haven't done this myself, but certainly would, even if the material was a bit less "mature" than having been submitted. However, I would also inform the students that this was happening, though not that I had doubts about it. If I had doubts, I'd want to resolve those first. If I were giving them written drafts or notes, I might even be inclined ...


1

ERC grants allow to apply for funding for the PI him-/herself, and thus to buy out of teaching (of course, this requires the university to agree beforehand).


1

I have done so. In my case the main reason was to illustrate how research happens by showing them work in various stages.


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