31

Beer and Circus calls this the "student-faculty non-aggression pact": Faculty provide an easy class and don't look too hard into cheating Students happily take the easy grade and leave the professor free to do research I wouldn't say this is "the rule"; plenty of faculty do an awesome job teaching. But, I'm not surprised to hear your report -- some faculty ...


10

In my opinion this is hugely course-dependent, and standards vary a lot between universities and disciplines. If your task in the class is really almost only lecturing (e.g., you have assistants that run any class projects etc., and who answer most of the "standard" student questions), and you already have everything prepared, your actual effort for the ...


9

Short answer: Don't do it Long answer: Breaching your contract would have legal consequences. It also will definitely not help you getting work anywhere else. Formally the fabled 'black lists' don't exist, but in general people talk to each other and someone simply breaking their contract is exceptional enough that news will spread fast. Furthermore at ...


7

Edit: question has changed. You probably cannot do much now. Once I realized what was happening, I started assigning zeros to the offending students, in accordance with University policy. As a TA, you should have spoken to the professor about the situation before taking any action. Student misconduct is squarely in the professor's area of ...


6

Expanding on my comment to make it an answer. Department chairs deal with this all the time, and have to figure out which complaints are legit and which are students complaining as an excuse. I've seen several courses of action. Do nothing. If the student's complaints don't seem reasonable or seem out of character for that instructor, it's a waste of time ...


6

First things first, what is GE? General Education (whatever that may be)? Second, do realize that this is more than just "wrong"; it is downright unethical. Copying in the workplace can get you into serious trouble and result in possible loss of your future work experiences/reputation. Also, don't tell the professor what to do. Don't even suggest the zero, ...


4

I experienced a related situation when I was supervising a written exam as TA: I caught a student cheating who actually (though probably accidentally) admitted cheating ("I couldn't read anything" - yea but already trying to read other's answers is cheating). When telling my prof, he decided to nevertheless have the exam graded regularly. His explanation: ...


3

TL;DR: you could write a letter to your program director. However, success may be elusive, since the situation may be constrained by forces outside of the control of you and your lecturers. It is worth addressing. The official course evaluations are the appropriate place for this, so you have taken the right approach. However, depending on the situation at ...


3

In post-92 universities, Lecturer and Senior Lecturer together form the same salary range as a Lecturer in a traditional (pre-92) university. A Principal Lecturer in a post-92 university would have the same salary as a Senior Lecturer in a pre-92 university. Some universities in the UK also operate Assistant and Associate Professors, which further ...


2

"Talk to the professor first" is the norm in most of the rest of the world, but in many graduate programs in STEM in the US admissions decisions are made by a graduate admissions committee and students are matched to research supervisors (and funding sources) after they've been admitted to the program. It's quite common to have some specialized source of ...


2

Every university has a set of rules, which defer from one to another. In Germany, where I finished my Bachelor and Master (without cheating ;)), it's the so called PO (Prüfungsordnung, in English known as exam regulations. In there you can find a clear description of the penalty that awaits you including if you have been caught multiple times, which you say ...


1

The term Academic Associate may be specific to India or it may be generic. But a reasonable definition might be: Academic Associate. It seems to be something like a post-doc, though not actually requiring a doctorate. But, according to that definition, it isn't really a faculty position, but one for an assistant to a professor. I suggest that if you want a ...


1

A scale is just a scale: A range within which the university will pay. If they decide that you are the best qualified candidate, they will have to figure out whether it's worth their money to also hire you. Since you're already making a salary at the upper end of the range, it's clear to everyone that they will have to go towards the upper end of their range ...


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