97

If you do this for a minority, then you will have to do it every time a few students have some excuse. I suggest that you don’t consider this and make it clear that if they miss lectures then it is up to them to catch up on material. Providing double or triple repeats of lectures due to a few absences, especially if unpaid, is not a good use of your time. ...


61

I expected her to inform me how the exam went I'm not sure why you expected this. While it's certainly not unusual to follow up with a tutor (or thank them), it's not a requirement. Is it appropriate to ask her how the exam went? I see no reason why not.


54

As a tutor in undergrad, we were taught to ask "how did the exam go?" and not "what did you make on the exam?" The idea being that the tutee gets to project their feelings onto their score (some are happy with a 75) and gives them a way out ("ehh ok I guess"). It's implicit in these instructions that asking "how did the exam go?" is appropriate for the ...


32

There is really no need to do this. Lecture is an efficient way for a single person to help a group to learn, but it isn't the most effective way for an individual to learn material. There are other ways to learn the material and they need to become familiar with them. Books, notes, discussions, but most important, exercises to make the material part of ...


8

From the comments: I provide the notes, worked example and further practice questions on Moodle for those who do, and do not, attend without fear or favour. If they choose to attend a workshop instead of your class, they are still receiving the material so are not at a disadvantage (other than missing out on what I'm sure is a superb lecture). They are ...


6

I'm assuming these are not frivolous workshops. In a large university, often one department doesn't really know what the others are doing and schedules are difficult if you want to learn stuff from multiple departments. So if these are "serious" workshops, you can be a bit accommodating. Especially since this is not an overly full class. You don't want this ...


5

There is contradictory evidence I think on whether for the general student, providing materials is beneficial or not. For example, a study finding a benefit in providing notes: Raver, S. A., & Maydosz, A. S. (2010). Impact of the provision and timing of instructor-provided notes on university students’ learning. Active Learning in Higher Education, 11(...


4

Two thoughts: (1) You may be under contractual obligation to hold scheduled classes. (If so, you may want to point this out to the students if they become insistent that you cancel.) (2) It may not be fair to other students in the class to let a few students get to, in effect, cancel a class. I would tell the students that it is fine for them to attend ...


3

An easy way around the problem is to record the lecture on camera.


3

Is it unethical? Yes. Is it worse than the alternative (usually canceling class)? Probably only slightly. Is it worth reporting? Only if it happens repeatedly.


3

If you ask are there "any" then the answer is clearly yes. But, like anything else, skills are learned. I turned out to be a good teacher, beloved by my students (mostly - some exceptions). But I started out as a terrible teacher with really poor ideas about how people learn. If you don't do something (a lot) you aren't going to get very good at it. Being ...


2

Well, the are two sides to the answer. It's either the exam went well or it didn't. If it didn't, I am not sure your tutee will be comfortable to tell you about it. Another thing is that your tutee may also expect you to ask how it went, to show you care. So it depends. Regardless though, it's not a bad thing to ask a student how the exam went.


2

Anecdotal evidence, but based on learning theory. There is no reason it can't be both. Actually it should be both. If you distribute your notes ahead of time, either electronically or on paper, the students can actually use those notes, when printed, as the basis for their own notes. I other words, the students can mark up your notes with their own ...


1

Everything I have read about such issues indicates that maximal learning occurs when multiple information channels are engaged. This is what the "see hear do" thing is all about. Multiple channels through the brain give maximum chance of retention. https://controlstation.com/the-power-of-the-hear-see-do-learning-method/ https://www.amazon.ca/ABC-See-Hear-Do-...


1

I'm asking this because I've attended many lectures given by well-known researchers and somehow they're all surprisingly good. While I can't identify any academics that are good researchers and poor teachers, I will note that there is good reason to think that good research and good teaching would be (at least weakly) positively correlated, and therefore it ...


1

From my very limited experience, I would say universities that participate in TEF would care about having academic staff with HEA fellowships (and there are many levels of fellowship). In my view, getting one will only work in your advantage. For what it is worth, I have been asked about having/willing to get the accreditation during job interviews, so I ...


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