12

The way for a "not so good" student to become better is to work harder and solve more exercises. Reading a solution is not at all like finding a solution. Your test becomes one of memorization rather than skill if you test on exercises for which the students have already seen correct solutions. I would suggest that if you provide solutions, rather ...


5

The underlying concern that you raise seems to be how you can best engage students to become self-motivated in their own learning processes, especially "the not so good students", with the resources that you have at hand. Perhaps you might first reframe this as a question back to the students. What will help you (students) become more self-...


4

As an instructor, I can assign readings to students, but I cannot actually force students to read. I can only provide consequences in the form of good/bad grades by, for instance, testing students over the reading. I believe it would help you to similarly identify which actions you have control over with regards to giving practice exercises. Students who ...


4

I'd go on about this in an informal manner. I'd probably ask general open questions like "What did you like about the course?", "What do you think could be improved about the course?", and then cover issues I am particularly interested in, like "What do you think of the way the exercise feedback was given?", "How do you ...


3

US News and World Report has data from 697 ranked colleges. Of these: 544 schools (78%) reported that no graduate students were the primary instructor of any course. These include all except two "National Liberal Arts Colleges." The 10 schools with the most graduate students as primary instructor were all large public research universities. These ...


2

You are doing two things wrong. (1) You have been provided with two TAs, but you are not using them to give students feedback on their exercises. (2) You are not handing out solutions. The result of this is that students are operating in a complete vacuum. On the day they walk into an exam, they have absolutely no information about whether their own work has ...


2

Generally I think it's good for the students to get some but not all solutions. It is sometimes helpful to see how an exercise is done properly, for orientation, and for learning certain things (including how to write). On the other hand providing too many solutions implicitly communicates that the exercises are not about "exercising" but about ...


1

It is pretty common at the undergrad level. A doctoral student who has been a TA for several years might be assigned an undergraduate course to teach. It is probably less common for that to be an upper division course, but it could happen if they have the requisite knowledge and some teaching skills. They may or may not (probably not) get an extra stipend ...


1

It depends on the subject, but in some of my physics classes for example, solutions were often provided for at least half the homework problems in advanced. However, knowing the final value of a solution isn't the same as providing a walkthrough for how to complete the problem, which is itself more difficult and more important for having a grasp of the topic....


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