74

Instead of the legal aspects, I would like to address the professional and ethical aspects of the pronouns trend. In my opinion, the purpose of announcing your pronouns is to indicate that you will address other people with respect. The message that is sent is: since I told you my pronouns, you know that if you tell me how you want to be addressed I will ...


57

While I don't know if it's technically illegal, I'd say that picking a fight like this would absolutely affect your academic career. Explaining this, I think, requires unpacking some of the social circumstances around these issues. You say "I personally would rather to not to do so for social and religious reasons." Stating one's pronouns is ...


51

Many universities in the United States have a faculty member who serves as the university ombuds, uh, person. Here is what my institution says about that office: An Ombuds provides confidential and informal assistance in the resolution of university-related concerns, especially those not being addressed adequately through normal procedures. He or she is an ...


41

I don't see a point in holding back ideas on purpose, at least not for a longer time. If you are doing well in research, you will generally have more interesting ideas than you have time to pursue. And you will keep having new ideas all the time. So there won't be a time when you will have ample of time, but be in desperate need of a great project. So you ...


34

Am I legally obligated to do so? A UK employment law expert believes that, in the UK, the answer is no: The question of whether UK businesses can force their employees to share their pronouns on their email signatures* was raised by a recent tweet. The answer, categorically, is no. [emphasis added —DR] [...] “Forcing employees to reveal their pronoun ...


18

You should consult your university administration if you are unclear about whether this is an official requirement. Note that it is unlikely (though not impossible) that this will be specifically a legal requirement, but will more likely be a matter of university policy. The university can require you to put this on you syllabus, if it is the policy. It is ...


15

For whether it is legal, I refer to Bob Brown's answer and focus on the other part in my answer on whether it affects one's career. Note that I will use the term 'trans people' loosely, including anyone who might want/need to explicitly proclaim their preferred pronouns (e.g. indlcuding androgynous people, intersex people etc. who did not switch from one ...


12

When I was a graduate student, I thought I had lots of good ideas; most of them I realized after working on them for 6-12 months were not so good or led nowhere (i.e. they weren’t good at all). In a competitive field, there is no point in holding back. In 5 years from now the simulation you wanted to do at the start of your PhD will no longer be cutting ...


7

It is possible. It is done all the time. But you should not expect getting any tenured or tenure-track job to be easy. Advice: Don't resign your current job until you get the new one. added My experience: Perhaps the usual would be hiring an associate professor with a one-year probationary period, after which tenure would be determined. Our university ...


6

I think you are too focused on what you want to study and not focused enough on what job or career you want to achieve. You talk quite a bit about the intellectual stimulation of various topics and feeling that nothing is “enough”. You get excited about what friends are studying and thing perhaps the grass is greener (it is probably not). In my experience, ...


6

My opinion. At your age (at any age) planning years ahead is hard. I'd recommend doing what excites you most and what you're best at. That seems to be chemistry. Doors may open (or close) down the road that you can't foresee.


5

Don't get in conflicting situations you can avoid. Learn to avoid conflicting situations well -- it is a very common interview question nowadays and you will be judged on your ability to handle conflict. ("We escalated this to the Dean" certainly will not reflect well on you.) Below I describe one possible compromise I think might avoid conflict ...


4

update: this answer may have become less relevant (but hopefully still worth to read) now that more details about the situation have emerged from the edits and extended discussions in multiple comments. As usual in a situation of differing opinion it will be very useful to try and understand the point of view of the other party. You say that "it is ...


4

First, CNR is a giant entity with a hundred units, spread across all Italy, and with about eight-nine thousand researchers. It is therefore quite different from a university. Yes, there are public competitions. All available calls can be found here. These calls are also published, like all public calls in Italy for whatever position, in the Gazzetta ...


4

I'll answer about where I teach, but I think it is similar in the rest of Italy. Typical amounts of teaching are: RTD-A 50-70 hours of frontal teaching / year RTD-B 70-100 hours Full and associate professor 120-130 hours. In addition, exams take quite a lot of time. You have to offer the students up to 5-7 opportunities to take each exam each year (yes, ...


4

The number of papers published in the first year by a PhD student depends on the research area, country, university, the student and the supervisor. Comparing with other students in your department can give you some rough idea about their progress. However, you cannot always compare easily. For example, a student who is pursuing a PhD in the same topic as ...


4

Not being able to do certain things is no reason to leave the field. Instead, the student could focus on what they can do, not on what they cannot do. In fact, it is often the people that "lack" the "advanced" knowledge who come up with creative ideas and new approaches that are different from everybody else. And if it turns out that the ...


4

The best way to win this kind of fight is to not start it in the first place. It is probably too late for you to take this approach. University administrators are used to getting their emails ignored, and they are used to getting incomplete replies because people didn't read the email properly. I would just ignore the question about your pronouns, reply to ...


4

The answer may depend on the field you happen to be working in. As an example, in health sciences, 5 months is an extremely short amount of time. It takes years until you have any data that's worth publishing and as a junior scientist, it is rare to publish ideas or concepts alone (ie. writing a review article, letter to the editor etc.). Those articles are ...


4

I'm not sure I'd look at it quite like that. Your dissertation has a problem to solve an/or questions to answer, so you do what's necessary to resolve that. That is the main line. There is no reason to make your dissertation longer or more complex than it needs to be. But, along the way you will have ideas for other related (and maybe not so related) things ...


3

In some fields, comming up with new ideas is not hard. But then, you still have to carry the research to test these ideas, and some of them may turn out to be bad ideas or to give results that are not great, even if you though it was some good ideas. What I personally do is to keep track of all the ideas that I have over time. For example, when I read a ...


3

To answer part of your question about financial concerns - If you are passionate about mathematics and likewise good at it, you should not ever have a problem finding employment, although it need not be a strictly math field. The knowledge one gets when learning higher level mathematics is applicable in nearly all technical fields, however it is more than ...


2

They are essentially fixed nation-wide, apart from a minor portion of local taxes. Here are the tables for my university. Labels are in Italian, but "Costo a.l. Amm." means "gross yearly salary", and "tempo pieno" means "full-time". You get a raise every three years.


2

If your main motivation is to become a well-paid and respected professor, then I would say that you're better off playing the lottery. If you think getting a PhD will mean that you'll have better career prospects, then there's some merit in that, depending on the field you're in. There's also a difference between research groups and universities. If you're ...


2

The other answers are focusing on "should I go into mathematics as a career?", but no-one has answered your first question, about what to do with your research results. There are related questions (with answers) on this site: Is it possible for a high school student with no academic qualifications to publish a research paper? What to do with ...


2

This answer is based on Australian observations. Most Phd students at a university are selected from honours students within the same department, and sometimes the honours students are accepted with the hope they will prove to be a good Phd candidate. I have seen one average undergraduate student accepted for honours - but they had a high grade in the one ...


1

No matter how many ideas you have, they will only award you one PhD. The definition in most disciplines is an original contribution of knowledge (that is, your knowledge and not anyone else's). Hence, if you are sure of your facts you could certainly hold back ideas over and above "enough" if you have a good reason to do so. Many people, however, ...


1

Keep in mind: given you are similarly bright-minded as your peers (including current PostDocs and Professors) and you are accessing the same material they are, it is likely that someone else is already working on those ideas. So ... do not hold back them! On one hand, they can be the starting point of a path to your future career steps and those ideas can be ...


1

If you were here in the UK, it very likely would affect your career path and there's little reason to suppose geography will be any defence. The UK press, if not radio and TV media, almost daily reveals examples of institutions insisting any possibility that students might be confused trumps however obvious your pronouns might be from the way you look. It's ...


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