If you need help with online teaching or other challenges in academia arising from the COVID-19 crisis, we have prepared this FAQ to get you started.
78

As most of the comments already say, doing a second PhD is probably not a good use of your time and not very helpful. From an industry perspective you have a math PhD, that means you are very smart and can learn anything, especially any maths very quickly. Learning some statistics or machine learning can be very helpful for an industry career but there is no ...


12

From your question and comments it seems that there are two distinct issues: Finding a good industry job with your profile: since you mention statistics I assume that you are looking at jobs in the area of data science. There is so much demand in this area that you don't even need a formal diploma, you could just teach yourself and acquire some experience ...


7

I'm a retired Uni academic. If you are determined to study more (and bravo for that), I would strongly recommend an MSc or an MMath in the subject. If you are short on skills, you will get far more from a good Masters. It will be cheaper, quicker and more intensive. Frankly, you will learn more as well. You've proved you can do research and that's the end ...


5

Actually the most important thing for you to focus on right now is getting a good research experience and a good relationship with an advisor. Get started on that. Learn to go deep into some subfield of your overall field. Gain expertise in that. Along the way, if you want to be an academic, a bit of teaching experience will help, but will be more valuable ...


5

I think you are vastly overestimating the value of ratings from a popular magazine as they apply to doctoral education and vastly underestimating the quality of doctoral education at any R1 in Texas. Frankly the real difference, in an individual field between a school rated 180 and one rated, say, 40 is likely to be a mix of random and the value of a given ...


2

Sounds like the contradiction in your situation is that you 1) want to become a professor at a smaller liberal arts college, but 2) don't want to go through the job search necessary (70+ applications, having to do postdocs where you move around constantly, etc) to get there. Unfortunately, you can't have both. You'll have to choose one or the other. If you ...


1

The UK might be an exception because there is a plan for a significant increase in research funding for mathematics (though who knows how national research budgets will change in the next few months), but you should assume that there are no academic jobs with a significant research component for mathematicians who do not have multiple papers that are or are ...


1

I have been in a very similar situation for quite some time. Sadly, I don't think there is a way out, or rather 'back in' - without the right connections. Unlike me, you seem to have at least one connection, the professor you mention. You have not given any details of that possible project (and how it would be financed). You should be able to talk to that ...


1

There is nothing wrong with having specific needs when it comes to job search, and that does not disqualify you for a PhD. To really understand the current state of the job market a good place to start is to talk with people in your field who have recently been on the job market, even if they didn't share exactly the same concerns as you. In the end whether ...


1

I also have a PhD in numerical analysis of PDEs (I would be interested to know in more detail what you studied). During my studies I made good friends with a senior statistics professor at the university and I was pretty surprised by the amount of overlap some of the things we were looking at. In particular we had a good conversation about applications of ...


1

It depends a lot on the kind of research you do and the CS department you are applying to. But my guess is that getting a tenure-track position in TCS will be harder than in math. There are some reasons for this: I think that even if you do a postdoc in CS, people will likely see you as a math person (by background and training). In my experience I am not ...


1

This question is a year old, but it matched my own experience enough (including the specialization in algebraic topology) that I felt obliged to comment. Getting an academic math position is a crapshoot under the best of conditions. The field is glutted with other highly competent applicants (pretty much everyone going into pure math does so with the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible