102

If you do this for a minority, then you will have to do it every time a few students have some excuse. I suggest that you don’t consider this and make it clear that if they miss lectures then it is up to them to catch up on material. Providing double or triple repeats of lectures due to a few absences, especially if unpaid, is not a good use of your time. ...


96

I wrote him mails on a weekly basis asking for a status update and inquiring whether he was stuck. It seems that you are completing your duties as an advisor well. You can and should continue to offer help and suggestions in accordance with your duties. Perhaps this student is too busy or too anxious to respond to your emails. In that case, you could ...


84

"they're not done with ill intent" Although disruptive behaviours by people with autism/autistic people are not done with ill intent, they do usually respond well to clear boundaries and feedback. A useful concept to consider here is Theory of Mind (ToM), something that is almost always impaired in this group. Individuals with autism are impaired in ToM;...


77

Exam dates announced at the beginning of the semester should only be changed with a highly compelling reason. The syllabus of a course is a contract with the students. Even if 90% of your students prefer the delay, if one of your students has to cancel an airplane ticket for a conference visit or miss a wedding, a balance has not been struck. If I were a ...


63

When someone asks in an interview, no-matter what the topic, which cutting edge approaches interest you, they are subtly asking three entirely different questions (in order of severity): Are you even exposed to any of them (which shows an interest in your subject in general) If yes, do you have an opinion on any of them (which shows leadership, independent ...


61

I expected her to inform me how the exam went I'm not sure why you expected this. While it's certainly not unusual to follow up with a tutor (or thank them), it's not a requirement. Is it appropriate to ask her how the exam went? I see no reason why not.


58

This would, I think, depend a lot on how the "answering" student goes about it. Just interrupting a request to the professor is disruptive, but some people do this sort of thing by reflex. But yes, a quiet word is in order. Ask them to meet with you. But decide first on what you would like them to do to correct the action. If the answers they give are ...


58

Welcome to higher education! Students will use formal assesement to guide their learning, and no amount of cajoling, or appealing to their sense professional or intellectual propriety will change that. Some students will always work above and beyond what the assessment requires of them, but most won't. Assessment is how students comprehend what is the stated ...


55

As a tutor in undergrad, we were taught to ask "how did the exam go?" and not "what did you make on the exam?" The idea being that the tutee gets to project their feelings onto their score (some are happy with a 75) and gives them a way out ("ehh ok I guess"). It's implicit in these instructions that asking "how did the exam go?" is appropriate for the ...


53

I'm a bit perplexed why they choose to do it that way. If one is doing major changes to an exam, then the students need to be informed of that in due time. I'm assuming you are not the only one who was negatively affected by this behavior? Assuming the situation is as you've described it, I would myself had lodged a complaint at the central examination ...


53

Is it ethical to give a grade (or extra credit) based on student feedback? I think the key question is, will reading draft material from your textbook help students towards their understanding of the subject of this class? If yes, then it honestly sounds like a great exercise to me. Not only does it force the students to actually read some material related ...


52

It is generally accepted that students deserve to be tested on their knowledge under conditions that are known sufficiently in advance to allow them to prepare effectively. Coming to class and being told you have to take an exam right that minute when you were previously led to expect a different testing scenario very obviously does not meet that convention. ...


50

Let's assume your teaching practices are the best possible. Students want you to change your teaching practices. You should respond by explaining to students why your practices are effective (do this even if they don't ask). Examples: additional exam papers with full solutions (there are already three past exam papers with solutions available). ...


48

No, for exactly the reason you give. If just a couple students share their grades with each other, it becomes trivial for others to be discovered by process of elimination.


48

The answer depends on your goals. If you have plans to work in academia, eventually you might find yourself on a track to becoming a professor yourself. In this role, you are expected to teach. Hence, you should be able to prepare teaching materials of high quality to support your teaching and benefit students' learning. The sooner you start working on your ...


46

I feel there are two different layers to that - whether, and to what extent, teaching evaluations are actually anonymous, and if they aren't, whether it's still "safe" to give a bad one. Are evaluations anonymous? On a superficial level, all universities that I have taught at had entirely anonymous evaluations. At no point in the process was I ever told ...


44

First, let’s offer a bit of sympathy where it’s due: students are a population that’s suffering right now in some unique ways due to the pandemic. Being a student can be very stressful at the best of times, and my impression is that for a lot of them it’s now more stressful and challenging than ever before. So my first recommendation is to try to be less ...


43

As the comments suggest, just ignore it. You will always have disgruntled students even if you do a great job. Some will blame you for their own shortcomings. But the best "defense" against such negative comments is the positive comments from those who think you served them well. If those appear also, then a reader can easily judge it for what it is. If ...


37

Most people who TA don't have an option as it is what pays the bills and allows them to study. It is less valuable if you can pay your own way. But it isn't entirely without value. I once held a full fellowship for study (multi year), but it still required that I spend one of those years doing the equivalent of a TA. The feeling was that it is valuable ...


36

Your supervisor is correct. Let the student fail. I'm shocked the existing answers are so lenient. You have given the student an amazing opportunity to work with your group, and from the tone of your question, I assume you have been providing adequate guidance and support. In response, the student has "ghosted" you. This is unacceptable. If you have not ...


36

First, a two hour time limit might be difficult to enforce or to guarantee, especially if it uses a real-time clock. At some level of scale you may start to find that some students didn't get the exam paper or were unable to return it by the deadline. So, I'd start by rethinking if a time limit of less than a day is really essential to your exam. Second, ...


35

Perhaps the key part of your question is that he student is not registered as a special needs student. Check your faculty handbook, student code of conduct, etc. to see what remedies are available for disruptive behavior in class. I've read your remark that "he cannot control most of these things," but he's impinging on the rights of the other students to ...


33

This answer is based on my experience in Germany, and in an engineering field. For interested teachers, universities usually have a central department that offers training, workshops, brochures, and plenty of information about how to teach. For example, here, here, and here. Many lecturers do not take advantage of these possibilities and still learn on the ...


32

There is really no need to do this. Lecture is an efficient way for a single person to help a group to learn, but it isn't the most effective way for an individual to learn material. There are other ways to learn the material and they need to become familiar with them. Books, notes, discussions, but most important, exercises to make the material part of ...


32

In practice, you will receive great feedback from a very small proportion of the students (and this subset will consist almost entirely of students who will do well on the course regardless). But even the weakest students can and will make perspicuous observations, or point out gaps in your explanations, that will be helpful. And then many students will be ...


30

An alternate approach, not of the "sink or swim" school, is to see what office in your university provides student services. In the US, a college or university will normally have a Dean of Students, part of whose job is to look after student interests and well-being. There may or may not be anything they can do, but if you have any suspicion that the ...


29

1) How should a professor react to the most advanced questions from her students of a basic course, if (s)he knows the answer? I would distinguish between reasonable and obnoxious questions. If the question is reasonable, then I would give a concise answer and encourage "offline" follow up. The question in your example seems reasonable -- it's essentially ...


29

Since cultural differences may be important here: I'm in germany. As you say, the teaching staff in academia learns teaching mostly in a form of training on the job. Pedagogy training for university teaching staff is a rather recent advance here, and I'm not sure how widespread that is done (read: likely still rare). Within that system, you have to ...


28

Absolutely yes. If you have teaching experience on your CV, you can claim that you're good at presenting, you know how to mentor juniors, you have worked with people from other cultures, you are able to work in groups towards a common goal (if you didn't teach alone, which you probably don't as a TA), you know how to manage disputes, and so on. Plus you ...


28

I am wondering if it would be appropriate for me to assign Youtube videos as lectures? Or would this be considered unprofessional/frowned upon/likely not allowed? My short answer: No, this is not unprofessional or inappropriate. Give your students the best materials that help them understand the content. If someone else puts something in an easy-to-follow ...


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