41

It would be unethical for a professor to publish something written by students under the professor’s name without express consent (which is to be given free of any coercive pressure) and coauthorship for the student. (See this recent discussion on a related type of abuse.) It would also be self defeating and something that no competent professor I’ve met ...


20

I have several personal experiences to add to others here. I was one of four graduate students in George Mackey's course who volunteered to take complete notes. He then used those to write a book. We were thanked in the acknowledgments. I learned a lot. See The Mathematical Theory of Quantum Mechanics. Once when I decided to write a text after teaching a ...


17

Marks are a measurement of how well the student knows the subject. So it depends on how much of a lack of knowledge that mistake represents: in most cases, if all steps are correct and only a number was copied wrongly, then obviously the knowledge of the subject is very good, and most of the question was done correctly, so "almost full marks" are ...


6

There are a couple of issues, but, assuming that students don't volunteer and aren't paid, the most important consideration is whether it has an "educational" purpose or not. As you state it, it sounds like you think it doesn't, but I've required my students to take notes, though not for my own use. In fact I've required them to give me back (...


5

This semester, I was able to join my office hours for a scheduled meeting at any time, even outside the window of the scheduled meeting. Zoom has a checkbox “Allow participants to join anytime” that may be selected when creating the scheduled meetings. You will get an email notification if someone joins when you are not there. This allows students to join at ...


5

You indeed need to master the topic that you will teach. So before each lecture, you need to make sure that you master the content to be able to teach it and to answer potential questions from students. Having said that, you still have some control over the content that you teach during each lecture and how you teach it. Thus, you can sometimes select some ...


4

Whatever it says in your pre-written markscheme. If you don't have one, the UK GCSE one is a fairly reasonable starting point: Misread or miscopy Students often copy values from a question incorrectly. If the examiner thinks that the student has made a genuine misread, then only the accuracy marks (A or B marks), up to a maximum of 2 marks are penalised. ...


4

I'll answer about where I teach, but I think it is similar in the rest of Italy. Typical amounts of teaching are: RTD-A 50-70 hours of frontal teaching / year RTD-B 70-100 hours Full and associate professor 120-130 hours. In addition, exams take quite a lot of time. You have to offer the students up to 5-7 opportunities to take each exam each year (yes, ...


3

Yes, absolutely, it is possible, at least, here in the US. Lots of top schools use teaching faculty for large undergraduate courses, especially in computer science and engineering and a few of them (like me at Michigan) only have a master's. The rule is you're supposed to have one degree higher than the students you're teaching or a terminal degree, i.e., a ...


2

Context always helps me to learn something. By giving the robotics topic first, you provide context on the probability, which makes it less abstract and easier to understand, which is very useful for the practically minded learners. For the theoretical learners, switching contexts from robotics, to probability and then back to robotics should be easy enough. ...


2

I have experienced this in a couple of instances myself. I took a graduate level Natural Language Processing course in my undergraduate, where the professor would have a student, rotating each class, be a scribe for the lecture. This was more of a volunteer thing where a student took notes for a particular lecture and posted them on the discussion board so ...


2

The short answer is, unless the rubric clearly lays out which kinds of errors merit which level of deduction, it is up to you. I would strongly encourage you to discuss this with whoever is supervising you in this role, as they may have expectations which have not been communicated clearly to you. Grading, especially without a clear rubric, eventually relies ...


1

Is it appropriate for professors to ask students to type notes for their classes (with or without paying students) in United States? I don't think it's appropriate for a professor to approach individuals to do so, in any situation you've listed, this is because it may seem like undue pressure. Proposing a general solicitation for a volunteer seems fine, ...


1

This answer is not specific to JHU and I have no experience there. But it might be useful background. An adjunct position is not a career and it is almost always poorly paid. Those people generally, who live off of such positions typically do "adjunct" for several institutions, have terrible overall teaching loads, and are still poorly paid. The &...


1

I always made my grading as transparent as possible. It makes it fairer for the students and if they complain and gather points where they should not get them, it helps me improve the grading in the next exam. From my point of view, tutors/teachers/examiners that do not make their grading transparent are not professional and seem to be weak at grading, ...


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