102

If you do this for a minority, then you will have to do it every time a few students have some excuse. I suggest that you don’t consider this and make it clear that if they miss lectures then it is up to them to catch up on material. Providing double or triple repeats of lectures due to a few absences, especially if unpaid, is not a good use of your time. ...


61

I expected her to inform me how the exam went I'm not sure why you expected this. While it's certainly not unusual to follow up with a tutor (or thank them), it's not a requirement. Is it appropriate to ask her how the exam went? I see no reason why not.


54

As a tutor in undergrad, we were taught to ask "how did the exam go?" and not "what did you make on the exam?" The idea being that the tutee gets to project their feelings onto their score (some are happy with a 75) and gives them a way out ("ehh ok I guess"). It's implicit in these instructions that asking "how did the exam go?" is appropriate for the ...


32

There is really no need to do this. Lecture is an efficient way for a single person to help a group to learn, but it isn't the most effective way for an individual to learn material. There are other ways to learn the material and they need to become familiar with them. Books, notes, discussions, but most important, exercises to make the material part of ...


29

1) How should a professor react to the most advanced questions from her students of a basic course, if (s)he knows the answer? I would distinguish between reasonable and obnoxious questions. If the question is reasonable, then I would give a concise answer and encourage "offline" follow up. The question in your example seems reasonable -- it's essentially ...


14

@cag51 makes good points, but I want to focus on this aspect of your question: The professor may not know every aspect and every trend in the subject he is teaching. If (s)he says that I don't know, then, the respect for the professor may go down. Else if (s)he says that it is beyond the scope of the course then the research aspirancy of the students may ...


13

I would suggest two principles: build and reward engagement, and speak to the whole class. Reward engagement: Someone asked you a question about something related to the course material you're presenting? Awesome! That student is engaged and interested! That's great to see. I recommend you choose an answer that rewards rather than penalizes that -- so a ...


11

It is fine. But you seem to have the misconception that education is about answers. It isn't. Instructors don't ask students to do problems because they need the answers. They (the instructors) can probably figure them out on their own. I hope so anyway. The exercises are to get the students to do the mental work that will reinforce anything in the class. ...


8

From the comments: I provide the notes, worked example and further practice questions on Moodle for those who do, and do not, attend without fear or favour. If they choose to attend a workshop instead of your class, they are still receiving the material so are not at a disadvantage (other than missing out on what I'm sure is a superb lecture). They are ...


8

You were correct in not engaging in religious argument in an academic setting. But a valid answer, that is probably acceptable to most people, whatever their faith, is, "I don't know. Your question is outside the realm of science." If further asked, "What do you believe?", you can say that it is a private matter. Unfortunately too many religious ...


7

As an alternative to basing your videos on someone else's work, I suggest writing your own exercises. Each exercise should bring out the issues you want to cover in the corresponding video. If you write your own exercises, on your own time, you own the copyright, and can do what you want with them, including creating videos about solving them. That would ...


6

I'm assuming these are not frivolous workshops. In a large university, often one department doesn't really know what the others are doing and schedules are difficult if you want to learn stuff from multiple departments. So if these are "serious" workshops, you can be a bit accommodating. Especially since this is not an overly full class. You don't want this ...


6

I assume that your goal is not just to catch and fail the free riders but to see to it that they actually do the work that will result in learning. However, I'll note that having a goal of "sharing the work equally" is unattainable except over time and/or averaged over many different interactions. The most radical suggestion here is to flip the classroom ...


6

1) How should a professor react to the most advanced questions from her students of a basic course, if (s)he knows the answer? It depends on how long it would take to explain the answer. If it is a matter of a minute or so, the professor can just answer. If it is going to be a lengthy digression, wasting the time of most of the class, these days I suggest ...


5

Yes, it is an oversimplification overall. First, state laws vary about who can teach, and some laws apply to private schools as well. You may need certification or not to be hired, but in some places you will need to seek it afterwards. Most schools need to be certified by the state themselves, so the rules need to be followed. Whether having been a TA or ...


5

Many university professors have side gigs doing consulting work for industry, writing, starting companies and doing many other things. At all universities I’m familiar with this is permitted and to some extent even encouraged. Usually there will be a policy in place specifying how much outside work is permitted. For example, here is a link to the relevant ...


5

There is contradictory evidence I think on whether for the general student, providing materials is beneficial or not. For example, a study finding a benefit in providing notes: Raver, S. A., & Maydosz, A. S. (2010). Impact of the provision and timing of instructor-provided notes on university students’ learning. Active Learning in Higher Education, 11(...


5

If you were the professor for the course, I'd give a different answer, but consider the following. I'll assume that you have the same group for each meeting, rather than a random selection of students that changes randomly over time. This lets you set expectations and a general flow. One problem you may be encountering is that the students haven't yet ...


5

My experience with this sort of issue has been in teaching astronomy classes for gen ed students in which we deal with the Big Bang. In this context (which differs somewhat from yours), I think it's a good idea not to completely shut down questions about religion. A student who is a business major may have very little understanding of how science works and ...


4

Two thoughts: (1) You may be under contractual obligation to hold scheduled classes. (If so, you may want to point this out to the students if they become insistent that you cancel.) (2) It may not be fair to other students in the class to let a few students get to, in effect, cancel a class. I would tell the students that it is fine for them to attend ...


3

Is it unethical? Yes. Is it worse than the alternative (usually canceling class)? Probably only slightly. Is it worth reporting? Only if it happens repeatedly.


3

The general answer isn't really a number. I expect that in most cases a teaching load is similar to that of a regular faculty member, though that isn't necessarily the case. The semester, trimester, quarter system defines how many regular terms there are per year, with trimester and quarter often being synonymous. It is the number of terms that most ...


3

An easy way around the problem is to record the lecture on camera.


3

Actually, I think it is easy to avoid most problems. Plagiarism is about presenting something of others as if it is your own. If you cite the source, giving proper attribution, you avoid plagiarism absolutely. Copyright is another issue, but it is about copying something for which you don't have the proper rights. You don't seem to be doing that. Taking a ...


3

If you ask are there "any" then the answer is clearly yes. But, like anything else, skills are learned. I turned out to be a good teacher, beloved by my students (mostly - some exceptions). But I started out as a terrible teacher with really poor ideas about how people learn. If you don't do something (a lot) you aren't going to get very good at it. Being ...


3

Some, most, many teachers don’t. I give the worked solutions to all of my problems after a week to give the students time to attempt them. Some solve them all and don’t need to check, others solve some and check some, others do none and look at the solutions, then think it is easy...


3

I can only answer for biological sciences: Universities will have something along the lines of a "Workload Allocation Model" system for dividing up work. Under our departments accounting you get 3 hours prep time for every formal teaching session you give, plus 20 minutes for every exam script you mark. Tutorials don't count as "formal teaching sessions" ...


3

Some students don't like to get up early in the morning, so attendance can suffer then. Just after lunch (or supper) can be hard as people can get drowsy. None of that is necessarily a problem if the course is interesting and you have a way to keep them active.


3

Many secular universities have theology faculty. You can suggest that your students ask them theological questions. This is the same as if I, a physicist, when asked about human perception of sound, suggested that students ask you.


2

Avoid first morning classes: students miss busses, get delayed etc. The first class of the day is always the most disrupted. Moreover, it is difficult for me as an instructor to “get in teaching mode” when class starts so soon after I arrive (lest you are comfy with really early arrivals), Avoid classes at meal times: students have their mind (and their ...


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