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0

I give an oral quiz to each of my students, not to find plagiarism but to assess understanding of the material. I pay close attention when a student of whom I believe to have "paraphrased" their entire paper. I'm a science teacher which puts me at an advantage. if the student can't comment on any of the challenging concepts, I find it suspicious.


9

In my opinion this is hugely course-dependent, and standards vary a lot between universities and disciplines. If your task in the class is really almost only lecturing (e.g., you have assistants that run any class projects etc., and who answer most of the "standard" student questions), and you already have everything prepared, your actual effort for the ...


0

I am a lecturer in the UK, and my teaching load is 200 contact hours per year. I think this is higher than average in the UK because our university is post-92 and quite teaching-oriented. This is also (supposedly) lower than average in our university because I have an additional workload allowance for research.


4

There are several mechanisms we have that in theroy should deal with this sort of thing: All academics must have their teaching observed by another member of staff at least once a year, but ideally once a module. All academics must observe someone else teaching once a year. When this happens a form must be filled in that says what the observed could improve ...


2

Some universities hold "Faculty Development" seminars and even full day workshops. Sometimes these are required, especially of new faculty. It is harder to influence bad actors among the tenured faculty as long as their actions aren't egregious. But even tenured faculty can be influenced by a dean who makes attendance at a workshop part of the required ...


11

I studied in the United States (bachelor's and PhD). In my school, it was very common practice to list "TBA" (to be announced) for course professors, especially undergraduate courses. Through my years in the university, including becoming a part-time instructor myself as a PhD student, I got to know that it was pretty much always a logistic issue. Even if ...


0

Sorry to hear that but sadly things like that are very common and practically the average norm around the world. At least I can vouch on such for latinamerica and for some asian countries where the value of memorization of knowledge is considered more important than understanding such knowledge or producing any useful research along the respect for the ...


0

I'm not really sure what the issue is. Similar courses are offered all the time. Some examples from my own life would be: A physiology department offering courses for majors, pre-med students, and nursing majors. A linguistics department offering syntax courses for theoreticians and computational linguists. My department had Intro to Linguistics for non-...


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Note that I am not totally sure what the problem is. I assume you don't want your students to get credit twice for the same material. In this case, if you have the power to do so, you could split up both courses into the"overlap" and the "rest", each a seperate course. (If there are two many students, both profs could teach the overlap simultanously.) Now ...


2

If it is between 2 possible courses, its better to check what is different and what is the same, then join what it is the same and if there are not that many differences then add them all in the same course, if there are many, then you can either give one course with extra set of classes for each course (which is a bit of an administrative nightmare), or you ...


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I don't see a problem with contacting him, though his reasons for leaving may not be relevant to your situation. There seem to be a lot of red flags here, but it is possible that they are false alarms. I would send him a note saying that you are under consideration for a position at the given department and asking if he has any advice he is willing to ...


2

You want the best letters you can get. A letter from a professor who doesn't know you well or your work will be worth very little as they can't honestly say much about you to boost your application. If a post-doc can, in fact, say positive things about you as a teacher, then that would be worth more. They are more experienced than you are and so will have ...


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