New answers tagged

0

Within the UK all degrees will have entry requirements for a course, and I expect this is the same throughout Europe although I suggest you check for yourself. As I dont know the exact situation for the entry, ie university or country, I will answer in general terms. Typical entry requrements are based on a progressive points system, where your previous ...


-1

Yes, it seems in your case simulation is necessary. In many cases, not probably for the situation involving machine learning, simulation results must be backed by mathematical analysis and proofs. If you have proposed a framework or an idea, how would anyone know if it is workable? Science requires hard proofs backed by experiments. So, Yes it is necessary ...


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At the Technical University of Berlin, Germany, we have some courses that start at 8:00 AM. So I suppose it depends on university, course, semester. I prefer evening courses rather than early ones. But I don't know how are the schedules in USA.


2

Personally, I'd like to say I would ignore such a mistake, and indeed my eyes would likely skip it. But if I noticed it, it would raise my brows. I'd suspect that either you are not using a spell checker on an important document (which would make me think less of you), or you've ignored some warning given to you (and spell checkers in fact do give lots of ...


13

Several countries in southern Europe have lunch, dinner and working times shifted toward later hours with respect to northern European countries or the US. For instance, in my university, in Italy, lectures are scheduled from 8:30 am to 7:00 pm, both for undergraduate and graduate classes, and in the past I also taught up to 8 pm. Other universities have ...


14

Europe is not a country, but a continent. There is a lot of variability inside Europe. So no, it is not a European thing. All Bachelor's, Master's and PhD courses I teach (in Germany) are between 10:00 ad 16:45. About 15 years ago I taught a course (in the Netherlands) in the evening for a part-time Bachelor's program aimed at people who work besides their ...


2

There are two main causes for incorrect spelling: You made a mistake, a typo, or you didn't know how to spell the word correctly. "mercandising" seems to be a typo. That's much more forgivable. Getting "your", and "you're" wrong would be more of a problem. I did review someone's CV before it was sent out and noticed "wether" was used instead of "whether". ...


11

I'll give a different answer, which is deliberately not an answer to the exact question you asked. Can you fix it? Can you overwrite your initial CV on the web application form, or ask the admissions administrator to replace it for you, or something like that? If so, then you should fix it, because you're trying to present your best self with your ...


2

OP asks, will the spelling error be a "major issue for my application" MAYBE. The spelling error on the first page is evidence that OP might not have read their own paper prior to submission. That is demonstrative of a lack of attention to detail. Whether writing a simple email or important application, take the time to read it at least once to catch ...


6

For the purpose of admissions it's unlikely to have any impact. If this were to support a job application, where a recruiter might have 500 resumes in front of them, and 95% of those resumes end up in the trash after one pass, you want to make every effort to prevent yours from being trashed, and every effort should be put into making sure your ...


63

I'll give the same answer as Allure, but for a very different reason. Not only is it common, but most people won't notice it. And of the few that do, fewer yet would think it an important enough issue to bother with. "Egad, this person misspelled a word. Horrors." Nope, it ain't gonna happen. But, you also need to be assured that no single thing, ...


17

No. Check this paper out. As of time of writing Google Scholar says it's received 3871 citations, which puts it well into the upper echelon of papers. And yet on page 50 there is ... To diagionalize the remaining four dimensions, we transform to a new set of variables Obvious typo, but it's far from uncommon and it doesn't stop people from reading and ...


4

It's not unheard of for someone to be unable to attend a conference after having their work accepted. This can happen for any number of reasons that may be seen as having varying levels of validity in someone else's eyes, ranging from "death in the family" to "I have better things to do". I don't see a compelling reason to open yourself up to such value ...


0

It's true that information about grad school applications (and statements in particular) isn't always easy to find. MIT Grad Blog has a couple of articles that might be helpful: How to Craft a Personal Statement. Some practical tips and perspective The Key to Successful Applications. The qualified match approach to personal statements That said, there ...


0

Perhaps it matters less than you think. Some people are absolutely driven to work in a very specialized domain. Others, at the other end of the scale, are just attracted to academia. I was somewhere in between. I knew I wanted to be an educator and I knew I wanted to work in mathematics, but, beyond that, I wasn't especially committed to any one thing. The ...


0

If you read random papers on arXiv without having research experience or knowing how to choose, your chance to find something that awakens your interest is very little. Normally, this problem is solved by doing some research during your Master's program. You say that there are very few research opportunities for students at your university, so become active ...


0

I suspect your question will get closed rather quickly as it's a shopping question. For graduate programs you don't want to simply go with the reputation but find a research lab, project and an adviser that you are interested to work with. This has nothing to do with reputation and all to do with the individual strengths of the school's research groups.


2

Seems to me like a long shot. There are a lot of obstacles. But first, few secondary schools require a doctorate to teach. So, what is your real goal? The doctorate? Secondary teaching? Next, you won't have much of a life if you try it. Think 80 hour weeks for a couple of years. A doctorate doesn't often get easier after you pass comps. Just the ...


0

I think the only conclusion that you can draw from the situation is that the PI perceived something that made her feel like she didn't want to commit to a multi-year relationship with you. I don't think it does you much good to wonder if she really has the resources for more than one student or not. There are some hints in some of the comments you've made ...


4

If you are in good terms with your PI and you have weekly meetings with her, it is probably best if you bring up the topic in your next meeting. If "lab politics" are really involved (which need not be the case), it is unlikely that she will provide more information through email. If she had told you that she would have funding and space for you all, it is ...


1

It varies, so you need to check with the program. For example, if the grad students are unionized at that institution, the CBA might specify that the PI can't sweeten a grad student's base stipend out of a grant. There might also be distinctions between what's permissible during the academic year and what's permissible during the summer.


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In my experience, “guaranteed funding” means that (depending on field) you will be either working for a PI who has grant money to pay you or working as a TA (with the possible exception of your first year, where their may be general department support while you find an advisor). Because graduate stipends are typically on a pay scale, working on a grant can ...


0

I doubt that it would happen. You don't say what the stipend is for. If it is an RA then you are already being paid for research help and it might actually come out of any grants. If it is a TA then you will have certain (teaching related) duties for that and the research project is probably more associated with your own degree than as an "assistant". But, ...


2

I am interested in doing a PhD from a third tier school in Electrical Engineering Ranked about in the 60's in North America. In my field, companies will only hire from Top 20 schools. I would like to stay in academia after graduating after being in industry for a few years. Assuming all of the above are true, then clearly this is a bad idea, ...


0

I'm applying for master programs and the 16 selections are range from dream to match to safe, with about five in each category. Please for simplicities' sake, choose your top one out of each category, and save yourself so much time and stress. That would be 3 recommendation letters. If you must, add 1 or 2 backups and have a max of 5 needed letters. If ...


1

I plan to apply approximately 16 schools and wondering whether they're too many for my recommendation letter providers...It's happened before that a professor of my friend regretted to provide all letters for him because they're too many. You needn't necessarily require a letter to support each application (unless that's strictly required). You may be able ...


-1

Consider how long it will take for your professor to write one great recommendation letter for you. Next, consider how much time it might take your professor to produce 16 fantastic recommendation letters for you. Most people will do a fairly awful job if they feel they are being undervalued or asked to serve unreasonable requests. That you are asking the ...


6

Unlike the other answers, I do not think the professor's time spent customizing is an issue. Customizing a letter does not take that long. Professors have lots of practice. Submitting it can take longer due to low quality submission systems. But writing the first letter is most of the work. The issue is that only one of these letters is worth submitting:...


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Inform your university’s disability office. They should be able to handle things appropriately. In most OECD countries, there is a law prohibiting discrimination against individuals with disabilities, and obligating workplaces and schools to provide reasonable adjustments. As a result, the universities in those countries will have equity offices who should ...


0

No, nobody needs to know. Your letter writers need to attest to your academic abilities, whereas your medical history is not something they need to know nor do they have any business telling anyone else about it. As a matter of fact, all that ought to matter are your academic abilities. The fact that you're applying for graduate school implies to me that ...


50

As other people have mentioned, the problem with 16 schools is that a professor cannot, either truthfully or operationally provide customized letters to 16 different schools. By "customization" I mean more than changing the name of the school and program. Good letters of rec use professor's familiarity with their field to speak to applicants' specific ...


33

Tell your professor of your plan to apply to 16 schools, and let them decide if it’s too much. They are capable of making their own decisions without you doing that on their behalf. It’s nice of you to worry about the professor’s well-being, but unnecessary, and counterproductive if it ends up undermining your own success. And as for the professor ...


3

You can ask him, of course. But the problem with asking for too many is that you will get a general letter sent to all, rather than a letter tailored to each given position. I realize this is hard if all schools have similar deadlines, but if possible you should spread it out over time, with your professor's OK. You can also have a different professor ...


1

There is probably a small overall effect. But most universities are interested in diversity, and many universities encourage their students to move on after graduation. The reason is that, if the faculty in a (sub) field is small, then you will benefit from wider exposure to ideas. You may have learned about as much as you can from a given faculty. Some ...


1

It depends a lot on your relation with your prof. I'd say something like "I spotted you got the xxx grant - congratulations!" when meeting them on the floor, or add something similar at the end of an email that you would have sent anyway (planning the next meeting, asking for feedback, etc) - don't overthink it.


1

In principle in public schools you need to be certified. In practice the shortage of STEM teachers means that you can sometimes get hired without this, but then in the first year you must complete the requirements for certification. This is the model that programs like Teach for America or NYC Teaching Fellows use. To earn a teaching certificate you need ...


5

Yes, it is an oversimplification overall. First, state laws vary about who can teach, and some laws apply to private schools as well. You may need certification or not to be hired, but in some places you will need to seek it afterwards. Most schools need to be certified by the state themselves, so the rules need to be followed. Whether having been a TA or ...


4

If you feel like congratulating your professor, go ahead and do it. He might appreciate it, or in the worst case he will ignore because he has too many emails in his inbox. But I cannot imagine a scenario where the professor would take such a congratulation email negatively. As with most emails to busy people: keep the email short and to the point. Just one ...


0

I can imagine that there may be circumstances that you declined an award that might still be worth mentioning you had the chance, but in general people don't do this. You don't list other jobs you were offered or other PhD places, just the ones you did choose. The only exception might be if you are very early career and this is about the only thing on your ...


0

You can simply write that you want to pursue your career in research. PhD are made mainly for research. Keep in mind that in Europe it is not possible at all to be enrolled in PhD if you didn't finish your master's degree before (3years bachelor + 2years master + 3/4years PhD in Europe).


0

you should add in your CV only what you think it is favorable for you for the particular application. CVs are customizable for this reason. BTW regarding your case, I would not add the scholarship that you refused. Normally in CVs you mention only the funds that have been useful in your academic path.


2

I would also agree with your gut feeling in this particular case. I can, however, think of a scenario where a declined award/scholarship should be included on your CV. In countries where you pay to study at a university, you can apply for scholarships/postgraduate awards/student funding. There is often a limit on how much funding an individual can accept. So,...


1

I would agree with your gut feeling: if you have a compelling reason to go to school A, it is better to leave it out of the application for school B. Motivation is also an important factor that selection committees take into account when deciding who to admit. If the award has already been irrevocably declined and lies in the past (i. e., if it cannot ...


1

For any application, for school or a job, the key thing is to make sure that everything in your application indicates a successful future. In Germany, where a masters is mostly "expected" it might be hard to convince an advisor that you are ready unless you have done some exceptional things otherwise. Having the master's gives the PI a better chance to ...


1

That is probably possible, provided that your advisor approves. You will need to set up a communication channel with the advisor, of course. You will also need to make sure the all fees are paid for your degree. But many advisors will permit this. And, I hope, most universities. I know of at least one such case, but here, the candidate had to make several ...


2

Just say thank you and send best wishes for the health of his father in law. Nothing more is needed. Three is no need to feel bad about your request. It is perfectly normal and natural.


0

What color are the highlights? There is a chance that everything you submit gets printed for review. If you highlight with say, dark red*, the black and white print might be illegible. Also it might leave an impression that you are at least sloppy or disorganized. With how trigger happy people are with elliminating applications, I think there is reason ...


3

Two Bs in significantly harder, graduate level classes will not harm your chances of admission much if at all. Your GPA will only take a very slight dip from them (assuming your other marks are high) and, really, you did fine for your level. Remember that you are a whole package, not a just GPA. Write a good statement of purpose, work on doing well on the ...


2

You can check the portal web sites to see if they offer a chance to revise. If none is visible you might ask if you can find a contact email on the site. Otherwise I think you are out of luck. If the statement is good maybe the raised eyebrows won't matter in the final decision.


2

what should I do? No action is necessary.


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