New answers tagged

2

I did this myself, but I've seen lots of people failing. There are a lot of hints and compromises you should think about: What helped me: I've earned many credits from "isolated classes", which I took before actually enrolling. Time is critical when your are not exclusively dedicated to an academic program. So work a lot before the clock starts ticking (i....


2

This is definitely doable, and I know because both me and my wife have done it (simultaneously in fact). And we had kids while we did it. And she was pregnant with and gave birth to another child during the final semester of both of our programs...I would not recommend aligning having a child with this (we didn't mean to, but life happens). Look into ...


6

Yes. It is definitely possible to do Masters or PhD degree while working. I did that comfortably. I wish you success in your pursuit of learning. I achieved M.S. degree in Software from a great university while doing a demanding job in a New York based company. These 3 factors have helped me achieve the degree without hassle: The Manager was convinced ...


4

As other answers have mentioned, it is not just possible to complete a master’s while working full time, but there’s a whole assortment of great master’s programs designed specifically to accommodate career professional students. In the industries I’ve worked in, primarily aerospace engineering and defense, it’s a prevalent part of the culture that early ...


1

I did this with a thesis-based MSc in Software Engineering. It was a terrible idea. I worked full time (>40 hours/week) at a software engineering job. Since it was my first job, I also wanted to be good at it, so I put in more than 8 hours a day. I would then come home, eat, and either work more remotely for my employer or work on my MSc. Weekends were ...


1

Depending where you are and who you work for, maybe your employer would be willing to let you do some of your course on their time? If it's relevant. They might even contribute to the costs. This is not uncommon here (Germany), especially for PhDs, but then it has to be relevant and useful to your employer. In fact, our firm will offer to support you with ...


9

I have completed 2 Master's degrees online with a full time job and 3 children. It is very possible. I did spend several hours a night on homework. I did that several times a week. I did have time to spend with my family as well. It does require a lot of time. Ask yourself this: In 2 years, where are you going to be? It will be 2022. Regardless if you ...


1

At least with regards to the UK - it's highly dependant on the institution and the demands of their program. I had a guy on my CS masters course who worked full time and due to the self-learning-centric course design, he managed to get away with making a deal with his employer in regards to flexitime and compulsory program obligations. He also practically ...


2

Yes, it is possible to do a masters while working full time. The trade-off is that it takes a much longer time to get a degree in many cases. I know that at least one university in the UK offers such courses, as my father was the Distance Learning Coordinator for the Civil Engineering department. There is a short article about what Civil Engineering ...


18

At least in the US, there are often masters programs designed specifically for people with full time jobs. Often people attend these programs with support and even funding from their employer. Classes are mostly at night. Your work schedule may permit you to take normally scheduled classes, however. Unlike a PhD program, you also often have the option to ...


9

It's doable (I know someone who did it) but expect it to be hard. You can compare it with your current job - a full-time Masters student might work 40 hours a week. If you do it part-time, you might have to work 20 hours a week. Added to your day job, that's 60 hours a week. Can you cope with that? Some people undoubtedly can but for others it'll be very ...


33

A lot of people in the US do this, actually. Some places have enough evening classes at the MS/MA level that it may not disrupt normal work hours. But it takes a lot out of the rest of your life, of course. It is easier in a field in which you can complete the degree without research, say by coursework and/or creative writing. But if you can afford to ...


1

Unless you're bothered about the teaching aspect, How about "scientist"?


3

If you want to stay vague, I would go with I am an academic / in academia but I think it is more useful to be subject-specific I am a mathematician / chemist / historian at the University of X. That way people understand that you are a researcher and a teacher, and what your area of expertise is.


5

In the US, if you say something like "math professor", no one will assume that you are referring to the actual rank. I think this is the most natural way of saying what you do for a living in an informal context. "Faculty member" is also OK if you don't want to get into what your field is.


5

ok, so this answer is late, but no-one seems to have suggested tenure-track professor this sounds better to me than assistant professor and if someone asks you can explain that you are on a career path towards tenure / full professor if you have tenure then tenured professor might be an option


2

When talking to people that are not deeply into academia, I call myself "researcher [at the University (of Somewhere)]" to start with. Currently, I am postdoctoral researcher, some day I might be assistant/associate professor - I guess I will keep it that way. It's a word everyone should be familiar with (unlike postdoc or assistant professor), and it makes ...


5

In the UK, there are currently two competing sets of ranks. Some universities use the traditional British structure of Lecturer - Senior Lecturer - Reader - Professor, whereas others use the more international one of Assistant Professor - Associate Professor - Professor. Job advertisements will often indicate how the ranks used in that university correspond ...


0

I like anton-menshov's response. In talking with non-academics, you can also quickly convey the reality of your position by calling yourself a "beginning professor" at University X. Then they know you are in fact a professor, and they know where you are among the different types of professors.


5

What about something along the lines of "Junior-ranked professor"? - this conveys both that (a) you are a professor for practical purposes (i.e., you do research and teaching), and (b) that you don't have a high seniority. This does leave out the fact that you do not have tenure, but industry people often do not care about this. Coincidentally, in Germany, "...


24

Try this: (Example) "I am currently a faculty member at the University of Texas, English Department (2013 - Present)" - since assistant professor vs. associate professor are simply ranking progress of a Ph.d on faculty simply state the basic.


-4

My suggestion based on what I would do: Just present yourself with your name and surname. Then, if other people ask about your job, you can explain that you are an Assistant Professor. If people consider your preparation only considering your Title, then you are sure that these people are not good at their work, so it's not good to have a collaboration with ...


39

I think you should just introduce yourself as I work as a professor at the University of X. omitting the assistant rank that can cause misunderstandings. The following conversation line feels also very safe: – Where do you work? – I do research and teach at the University of X. which might be a better fit since it explains your job in a short ...


0

This will depend on disciplines, but normally people want to see that you can yourself write, but also that you can collaborate, and that you know what it's like to write a strong paper / publish in the top venue. How many papers it takes to communicate this varies by discipline and person. Note also that in some disciplines having a single male author ...


3

Actually, your record is what it is. So a theoretical answer is of little use to you now, unless you have time to change things. I'd recommend that you apply for positions that you find interesting, and make your application as positive as you can. There is, in most fields, an advantage in collaborative work, especially for a junior faculty member. In ...


0

Some universities have a center or organization for teaching, which can provide resources for getting started. You might also check out https://opensyllabus.org/


0

Some do teaching as part of their Masters or PhD studies. Others do a teacher training course before, or after, Masters or PhD. Some do teacher training without wanting to do a Masters or PhD and teacher training courses can be short (about 1 year) or longer.


2

I am thinking of Eastern Europe, Central Asia and CIS-countries, Southeast Asia and other regions which recently underwent an economic boom I have had some experiences in regions that would fall under these general groups. Although what I will say it is not at all representative of the entire situation it might give you some ideas. I think you are overall ...


2

It depends on what you mean by "Eastern Europe", but my experience with EU Eastern Europe is that randoms from other countries with little experience and who don't speak the language are not particularly well-regarded as applicants for positions. If teaching is primarily in the local language, there isn't much use for you. Some Eastern European EU countries ...


7

In the UK, there is typically much less negotiation of entry-level academic contracts, compared to the US market, or general stories of how it was in past. Full professors still can negotiate their contracts, but assuming that it is your first permanent post, I would be surprised if the University would engage in a negotiation with you. Typically, the ...


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