New answers tagged

1

Talk to your union. If you're a university professor, there's a pretty good chance you're represented by a relevant employee union. Yes, even in the US. Hopefully, they have some experience with these situations and will be able to better advise you based on cases they've handled before. They might also offer legal representation, or at the very least - ...


0

I think that you'll find that school A will be very understanding. They'll be disappointed, but in the end, they're wise enough to know that they really don't want a faculty member who won't be happy living apart from his spouse. I don't think you have to worry about any fallout. I'm pretty sure most departments in most schools have had this happen at ...


7

This situation happens quite often and although other posters have already suggested all the best things you can do, here's my "do this and that" summary: Do not drop the ball on A under any circumstances: academia is a very small pool and you don't want to acquire this kind of reputation. Nothing prevents you from applying for jobs after a year ...


29

I would tread very lightly here, and perhaps consult a lawyer. If this is in the US then many states have “At Will” employment clauses - you can’t be forced to take a job you don’t want, and an employer cannot be forced to employ you. There may be exceptions to this, like no competition clauses, but it’s not likely you had one. You could, once you have ...


14

I agree with @user2705196 that there is no good way to do this. If you do I would tell A that you suddenly and surprisingly have an offer that will let you live with your spouse (and near family, but that's less weighty a reason). Do say you'd be willing to defer B for a year in order not to leave A stuck. Act soon. Hiring is still happening and A likely ...


36

There's no way to do this gracefully. You call school A and tell them that you will not be joining them after all. Afterwards you deal with the fallout. Before doing so you may want to estimate exactly how bad the fallout will be and whether it might affect your ability to do your job at school B.


0

My interpretation would be that they want to know what times you would be free on those two days, perhaps for a one hour interview. I'm assuming that they've named the days. If so, give them several options if possible. Send them an email with open times that work for you.


0

If it's a job you want, either clear your calendar for the two days they are proposing, or propose two days when you are free all day. It's not clear from your question if they are proposing the days or asking you to propose them.


7

been offered a lecturer position how to handle this situation? Do not sign the contract until you have an agreement that is satisfactory to your future spouse, yourself, and the person who supervises your teaching. Get the agreement in writing. Signing the contract and then asking for changes would be extremely rude if this is the sort of situation where ...


3

Cancel your wedding and hold it locally instead. In this time of global pandemic, international travel for trivial reasons should be avoided wherever possible, and weddings would be included in that. Travelling internationally to hold a wedding is simply selfish and irresponsible. As such, I would recommend that you simply cancel your European wedding and ...


21

Congratulations on finishing your PhD, getting married, and getting hired as a lecturer, all at once! Can you record the first lecture online? We've all been pretty used to online lately, so maybe you could start the class off this way. Apologize to the students, explain you're out of the country but everything will be normal for week two. You would ...


67

The best way to handle a situation like this is to get in touch with your Head of Department / Director of Teaching in advance (perhaps, after you receive a formal offer) and discuss your situation. Make them aware of your wedding date (congratulations, btw!) and explain that you can arrive to your post right in time for your first class, but you would be ...


0

(This answer is based on a year of applying to mid-tier UK universities for a Lecturer position, getting two offers and accepting one of them a year and a half ago) How deeply technical should I go in the presentation slides for such an opportunity? (i.e. are details at the equation-level required and journal citations expected?) No equations are expected ...


2

There are two ways to "fit" with a department. One way is to do similar things to what they do (and publish). The other is to complement their scope with something that is different enough that the overall scope expands. If you know what they do, then you can decide which approach is better for you to take. The first implies collaboration. The ...


1

This sounds like a case where legally and officially, you cannot be working as a postdoc before you receive the visa. Unofficially, no one is stopping you from working on a specific topic, or with unpaid collaboration, assuming you want to do this. If your aim is to continue research, such as to boost your publication record, most PIs would be willing to ...


4

In the UK, it is not common for postdocs and entry-level lecturers to negotiate their salaries. This is different from the customs in the USA and some EU countries. In the UK, the starting salary of a postdoc or a lecturer would normally be set up by HR in consultation with postdoc's PI or lecturer's HoD. As a postdoc, if you want a better offer, you have ...


1

Ask early enough. So if you do not understand something it is ok to think about it, do own literature research, but don't take too long. (Like sitting in the lab for 2 month, and when you are asked 'how is it going', 'oh I didn't know how to start the measurement' or whatever). Usually people do not ask enough but try to also avoid things you could find out ...


0

Please note one point: a visa is required to perform work (paid or not is not that relevant) in a certain location in the world. Contrary to what the majority seems to think, if you are working remotely, you still need a visa, depending on where you are based and NOT on where your employer / client is located. In other words, you can work remotely from the ...


1

Don't care about anyone judgement or the "pressure" to be on par with the others. You are already on par with them, since you got the offer. Do your own job, at your own pace, use as much as you can from the "prestigious" university, don't play down your requests, ask top of the notch resources/informatics/library access/attending and ...


2

Everybody comes from a different background. Whatever your experience was so far, it got you to where you are now. Take advantage of the new opportunities you have, but also take advantage of your previous experience as well. Being able to do so much with such limited resources means you have become good at exploiting those resources, nothing was served to ...


12

[Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, this is not legal advice] As Thomas mentioned in his comment, generally, without a visa you cannot be legally employed in the country of the university, this includes remote work from abroad. In addition to that, at least in some countries, it is illegal to do work that is normally paid, even if you are not getting paid for it,...


5

Understand what you have available to you, new assets, and learn how to take advantage of them. I expect you'll be competing with others who take for granted, and benefit from, kinds of support you would only have dreamed of.


5

A visa allows you to live in a country and (for the visa I assume you are getting) to be gainfully employed in that country -- that is, to draw a salary. You do not need a visa to work on things while you are in your home country (working in your spare time, or in fact in a paid position). In other words, you can work on whatever project you'd like even ...


19

Along with research, work hard to make a lot of connections. Certainly connections at the new university, but beyond that through conference meetings and collaborations. Build a circle around yourself. Join the circle of other, more senior people. Get a sense of all of the research trends around you, even if it shallow outside your specialty. And, keep ...


4

You can act active and send an email with suggestions to start working remotely. What does that mean in terms of the salary? Do you expect to get paid for that work? That point perhaps should be clarified.


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