Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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3

They have a webpage with open positions but none is related to what I am capable of doing. I wonder if they found the right person for that older job, or that person could leave before the contract expired etc. Contacting the project leader when they are no longer advertising for the postdoc is probably pointless. If the position were open, they would list ...


1

In general it's totally fine to write a short note asking if the position is still available. The worst that will happen would be your e-mail gets deleted and never replied to. Even if the original interview was some time ago, you could still phrase the e-mail as "wondering if there are any new open positions in your lab for X." In your specific case, ...


0

How does this project fit with the PI's research goals? The answer may be surprising. Do you think this project would lead to a publication? Is it possible this project would lead to a note or other short submission? If so, go for it. Even if you don't get the job, you can submit a paper. If it is a throw-away project, I would avoid it, unless you need the ...


6

My former PI used to give assignments to candidates he wasn't sure about but thought they might have potential. They would generally be small problems that he would then have one of his current students evaluate to see if 1) the general approach was reasonable and 2) how realistic their evaluation of their own progress was (e.g. knowing your results were ...


6

In the professional world there are plenty of interview processes that contain one or another way of skill assessment. That's pretty normal and not a way to devalue your general expertise but a matter of establishing whether your skills do fit the exact needs of the company and typically also if your way to apply them fits the company culture / type of ...


12

I find it a bit intriguing, actually. Though unusual. And, of course, if you object to it, move on now without another thought. But perhaps she just wants to know how you will attack a new and fresh problem without the support you may have had in your studies. Or perhaps she and you are in a field in which a lot of opportunities pop up and there are ...


17

It is highly unusual. As you note, the PI has plenty of "standard" information (publications, recommendation letter, CV, etc.) that can be used to assess your potential as a collaborator and independent scientist. This is what most PIs will use in the hiring process. Some will ask you to give a seminar or do an interview by phone, video, or in person. How ...


1

There is not a good reason. Some poor reasons are: Tradition Prestige Student expectations Regulation/accreditation Narrowing the job applicant pool They ought to require training in teaching the discipline instead of training in doing the discipline. The reality is that in the near future, both will be expected.


6

In order to teach new ideas in any field, you have to (1) understand how research is conducted, and (2) be current on the state of research in the field. By allowing you to do original research, doctoral programs prepare you for both, even if you do not continue research activity.


2

First, you should be aware that on-campus CS faculty interviews have already started. Yes, yes, I know that even the earliest application deadlines are still several weeks away, but at least in some departments (like mine), stellar candidates can be (and have been) invited to interview well before the application deadline. That said, you should not worry ...


1

The conference window is pretty small. I'm not sure why you'd be concerned. You should get, from any reasonable institution, some leeway in scheduling an interview. I think that is especially true in a case like this. Even more so if you were presenting, though you don't indicate that you are. And it might even turn out that some institutions will also ...


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