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3

IMHO you probably have the wrong impression of the master application workflow in Germany (which you already said might be the case) You are confusing two things: Enrolling in a program [as in "How to do it"] Finding a professor to do research with [If you're looking to see if a certain program is for you then ignore everything about point 1] For the ...


26

You might already know this, but just to be sure, keep in mind that the US and the German system are structured differently. In Germany, Master's and PhD are almost universally distinct, successive programs. I.e after you finish your Bachelor's, you apply for a Master's program, where after two years of coursework (and a small thesis at the end) you get ...


35

Generally, there is nothing wrong with sending e-mails to professors which demonstrate some interest in their research, also in Germany (where I work). It could help you get in contact with research groups you are interested in. However, it could also happen that you will get no response. One reason is that most students starting with a Master´s program ...


-2

I looked for a PhD in Germany several years ago and I was told it was quite normal to email professors directly. Your success rate may vary but I did receive a good number of responses within a reasonable timeframe, even though I did not end up with any offers. It may help your chances if you express genuine interest in with their work and outline what you ...


2

I have talked to the data protection officer of my university, who seemed very sensitive with regards to my concerns. So in fact, the university officially allows a small amount of private usage of computers - without explicity defining small amount. There also is a policy for emergency cases, where the head of the instite is not allowed to simply access the ...


0

Germany maintains a list of accredited foreign universities from which degrees are recognized; you can find it on https://anabin.kmk.org/anabin.html . I would first advise you to check if your American university is there.


1

If your job is in the Biology department, it could simply be that an Economics degree does not count towards prior experience in the field and therefore doesn't raise your wage. That's at least how it works with full-time "Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter" job positions.


1

Usual disclaimer: I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. What the institute says is completely wrong: there is no such law. The salary of Wissenschaftliche Hilfskräfte (HiWi, student doing scientific work) varies by state and by university, and it is not regulated by law. As explained in Chapters 3.3 and 6 of this document (unfortunately, ...


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