New answers tagged

3

The rules are theirs, not mine, but I would interpret what you say as indicating you would be ineligible. Your current university doesn't consider your degree to be a "glorified undergraduate degree", of course, nor will a university that you apply to. There is some resistance generally for accepting people who already hold an "equivalent"...


4

TLDR IMO (and based on classic answers of the Workplace Stack Exchange): Never inform your current employer of your intent to leave until your new employment is 100% secure. Adding to @Spark's excellent answer, I would make a few recommendations based on my conversations with other graduate students in similar situations. Make sure that your place in the ...


0

This question can probably be best answered by the MSDAI's point of contact. You can find their contact information here: https://uwaterloo.ca/graduate-studies-postdoctoral-affairs/future-students/programs/data-science-and-artificial-intelligence-mdsai-co-op


8

In most cases, using an online Q&A site to do your homework for you would be cheating. Consequences range from 0 credit to expulsion. Even if you aren't caught, or if homework isn't typically graded where you are so cheating isn't an issue, assignments are typically designed to help you learn, and having someone else do your work is cheating yourself out ...


7

I've had experience with similar issues and in my opinion, honesty is the best policy assuming that your advisor is a reasonable, non-vindictive person. If the issue is just the topic and the area, and not your advisor personally, then they probably want what's best for you and could actually help you out in working out the details (perhaps offering you an ...


7

These kinds of mistakes happen all the time. Don't worry about it, just move on -- the people who will read the letters understand that these things happen.


1

I doubt that this is plagiarism in the formal sense of the term. I'd equate it with using things you find in a text book. This relies on the fact that there are a limited number of ways in which some things can be done and also on the fact that students should be allowed to learn with other resources than those provided. However, if you are asking whether ...


2

Are there any reasons not to make transparent that you used the tutorial as a source? Using sources alone is no problem. Not citing is a problem. So cite properly and you should have no problem with plagiarism.


21

I have several personal experiences to add to others here. I was one of four graduate students in George Mackey's course who volunteered to take complete notes. He then used those to write a book. We were thanked in the acknowledgments. I learned a lot. See The Mathematical Theory of Quantum Mechanics. Once when I decided to write a text after teaching a ...


41

It would be unethical for a professor to publish something written by students under the professor’s name without express consent (which is to be given free of any coercive pressure) and coauthorship for the student. (See this recent discussion on a related type of abuse.) It would also be self defeating and something that no competent professor I’ve met ...


1

Is it appropriate for professors to ask students to type notes for their classes (with or without paying students) in United States? I don't think it's appropriate for a professor to approach individuals to do so, in any situation you've listed, this is because it may seem like undue pressure. Proposing a general solicitation for a volunteer seems fine, ...


2

I have experienced this in a couple of instances myself. I took a graduate level Natural Language Processing course in my undergraduate, where the professor would have a student, rotating each class, be a scribe for the lecture. This was more of a volunteer thing where a student took notes for a particular lecture and posted them on the discussion board so ...


6

There are a couple of issues, but, assuming that students don't volunteer and aren't paid, the most important consideration is whether it has an "educational" purpose or not. As you state it, it sounds like you think it doesn't, but I've required my students to take notes, though not for my own use. In fact I've required them to give me back (...


2

I usually set master projects related to my current research. So, I need to be able to use or build upon the work of the student, even if they decide they cannot be bothered after they finish the course. When I announce my projects, I put a requirement that the code developed should be under an open license (usually MIT). The students know this in advance ...


1

The OP asks "Is it ethical". I wish it was asked "Is it lawful". Then we could definitely say "NO"! But I believe that acting in violation of the law to deprive someone of their rights is definitely not "ethical". People under most jurisdictions retain the copyright to works that they create - except for specific ...


0

Motivating the students to learn probability theory is important, so if you can do it well, I think the "just in time" method (option 2) is the better method. There are challenges with teaching a subject like probability theory in a piecemeal way, but you might be able to teach the parts you need effectively using examples in robotics. If you can ...


2

Context always helps me to learn something. By giving the robotics topic first, you provide context on the probability, which makes it less abstract and easier to understand, which is very useful for the practically minded learners. For the theoretical learners, switching contexts from robotics, to probability and then back to robotics should be easy enough. ...


2

This opens up a huge can of worms regarding who actually holds the IP for the work. Simply put, though, if you were given this directive before you started the project, I don't see a real problem with it. You had the opportunity to limit your contribution to items you would have no trouble disclosing. FWIW, chances are your education on the process is most ...


10

This document likely only affirms what is already the rule (which you probably already signed when you enrolled). It serves more to make you aware that you are expected to share your work, than to actually establish a new legal obligation. And in any case, work that you perform at the university, using the professor's time, university lab space, and ...


4

This is somewhat more of a comment than an answer. I think there are a lot of pedagogically valuable assignments that involve student work being shared with people other than the instructor, and it would be a shame not to be allowed to assign them. Things I have assigned for the whole class to create a collaboratively edited document of notes on the class. ...


50

The red flag here is that the instructor is requiring students to sign away a legal right they have. What gives them the right? A university may reasonably make such a requirement as a matter of university policy in a few situations where that makes sense (e.g., as someone mentioned, it is standard that PhD theses are made public). But the instructor’s ...


3

Edit: The OP has just now stated that the requirement was not known to students at the beginning of the course, but only added later. That is unethical: changing the rules in the middle of the course after some effort has been expended and possibly not being possible to drop without penalty. Had that not been the case, I'd still stand by what follows here. ...


19

I don't know what my university's policy is (if any), but it seems clear to me that students should never be coerced (subtly or otherwise) into giving permission for their work to be shared. My students do some spectacular work, and I request their explicit permission to archive and share it - but I set it up so that they are free to decline, and so that I ...


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