New answers tagged

1

I would keep it private. The perception, whether accurate or not, is that private letters are more honest. Probably no way that would get back to the target of the letter, but it might circulate among students who in turn may, accurately or not, gossip about who is the favorite. No real good comes of that. There shouldn't be any useful feedback to a student ...


1

It is surely acceptable. There are reasons to do it, I don't think it's "wrong" in any sense. Personally, however, I'm not so keen on it, because I don't want to encourage students to discuss the contents of recommendation letters (I perceive discussions about our subject area or even general advisory and personal issues as much more constructive ...


1

Yes, you can share them, and probably should. The company is correct in promising confidentiality, but that is because the words aren't theirs, but yours. But since they are yours it is fine to share them with students. In fact, if you have to say negative things, it is best to discuss that with the student before you write the letter so that they have a ...


5

I see several reasons for receiving such an email, and it may not be the reasons that you surmised (some of which are noted in the comments). The fact that you received an email about a conference does not necessarily mean you are on the mailing list. You could have been blind copied (Bcc) on the message deliberately. This may be a good thing and indicates ...


5

If it is annoying you, ask your departmental administrator to remove you from the list. The IT department may be able to help you identify the person who controls the list, if it is unclear. You might even be able to remove yourself, depending on the system. Email is a very old technology which was never intended to be private. If there is a need to ...


1

This will depend on the university/department, as well as the specific course and professor/instructor(s). Where I did my undergraduate, all my coursework was taught by faculty in my department. Between each individual course, the TA situation varied. In many of the lower-level undergraduate courses, as well as the upper-division required courses, there ...


4

While a bit unusual, especially with the proportion you give, it isn't wrong per se for undergraduates to TA courses. Some students earn the responsibility they are given by hard work, and there might be financial incentives for them. I'd worry more about the quality of the TA assistance than about the fact that they don't hold any degrees. Reacting to your ...


17

Have you ever watched the movie The Karate Kid? In this classic American movie, Daniel, a 17 year old high school student in Los Angeles, is being trained in the art of karate by Mr. Miyagi, a wise older man who wants to help Daniel combat a gang of bullies. But Daniel is baffled and frustrated when, instead of teaching him exciting karate techniques, Mr. ...


7

For some jobs, yes you do. For others, not at all. It depends on the job and on what opportunities it provides. Jobs that require university education often have more opportunities in the future. But, I know that in some places, family pressures can be intense. Especially if one or both parents has misconceptions and prejudices. It is hard to resist, but it ...


3

Surely it is time to move on. Why it happens is too hard to say. Perhaps he depends on you too much. Perhaps it is jealousy. If he could arrange a permanent position for you and give you a path to take over more explicit authority in the group you could stay, but, otherwise, your prospects are better elsewhere. You should be applying to some permanent ...


5

Universities generally have a process for arbitrating disputes between professors and students concerning accusations of cheating. Ask at your department or major adviser what the process is. Typically it will go something like Talk to the professor and informally try to resolve the dispute. If that does not help, file a written petition explaining what ...


6

I think your best option is to explain how you studied to the professor. If you saved any of the work you did while studying it would help to show it. Perhaps it was just a matter of using similar names for things - which might be natural for two people studying together. But, if you haven't cheated on the exam, just continue to insist that you did not. If ...


0

In addition to the other fine answers here, I think a more general answer is that, as with other markets, price is determined by supply and demand (and any distortions in the market). Looking at things from this economic perspective, the main reason why postgraduates are more likely to obtain substantial amounts of scholarship support than undergraduates is ...


4

You're looking at it the wrong way. Both undergrads and grad students are charged tuition by the university. This tuition is used to pay faculty, administration, operating costs, etc. Some undergrads receive full or partial scholarships. You might say they are not "paying" for undergrad, but the university is still getting paid, just from a ...


1

PhD students are paid to do work. Undergraduate students pay money to learn. There is nothing similar about these situations. You can tell because PhD students who do their research and teaching work, but do not learn anything (perhaps because they knew the material it already) continue to get paid. A PhD student who learns but does not do teaching or ...


1

(US-specific) As was pointed out in the comments, grad-level professional programs generally do charge tuition, often a lot of tuition. Many academic master's programs do too, as do arts master's like MFA and MMus. But very few people would make the commitment for an academic PhD if they had to go deep into debt to pay 5+ years of tuition in order to earn an ...


8

In the UK, what you're looking for is called the "teaching and scholarship career pathway" (distinguishing it from the "teaching and research career pathway"). A jobs.ac.uk search for the word "scholarship" reveals quite a few vacancies on the teaching and scholarship career pathway.


7

University rankings are usually based on the expertise of their faculty. The way faculty show such expertise is by being recognized experts (recognized for their research) in certain topics. Therefore, top universities prioritize hiring faculty who are productive researchers. Most universities want to know that the faculty they hire are ready to teach also, ...


2

Since you have asked this question five years ago, things have changed and more people from Fachhochschulen are doing PhDs (although you still have to have a supervisor from a proper university). I know many people who do a joint PhD, where they stay at the Fachhochschule and do their research there (most of the time applied research), but are enrolled as a ...


3

The way this typically works in Germany is that you enroll at the new university for the desired degree. There will be requirements regarding what modules you need to pass for this degree. You can then apply for courses you have completed elsewhere to be considered as equivalent to some of those modules (this is called "Anrechnungsantrag"). The ...


0

Torricelli's law/theorem is not an engineering law (which could be interpreted as having some legal aspects); it is a fundamental result from the physics of fluid flow. The closely related theorems of Torricelli and Bernoulli are useful starting points for engineering work, but nothing more, since they are highly idealized and involve many assumptions. These ...


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