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9

Just opinion, of course, but I would suggest that a great professor at a small school, no matter its reputation, would be a huge asset. You will have a chance to work closely with a mentor that you wouldn't get to do as well at a larger place. I realize of course that size and reputation aren't necessarily the same. But it is the letters you get from the ...


12

First of all, information about the Abilitazione Scientifica Nazionale procedure is available on https://abilitazione.miur.it/ , although in Italian only. There is an English version of that site, but it is a (sad) joke: it only contains outdated information from 2013. Unfortunately it seems impossible to find up-to-date information that is not in Italian. ...


1

The goal of both getting hired in the same department is obviously a high bar, and much more difficult than just each getting hired somewhere. For the specific goal of getting hired at the same department, there are a few competing issues: Generally speaking, it is desirable for new hires to be able to collaborate with existing academics in the department, ...


3

When would be the best time to do this catching up? If I do it after beginning a postdoc, my postdoc work will be delayed during this (probably months) of catch-up time. A piece of post-doc advice that has worked for me is to have your fingers in several pies. Build up some new expertise while working on some low-hanging fruits from your existing background ...


1

An established method of making the transition is to take a 1 year Masters in Theoretical Physics or Mathematics after completing your PhD, or to attend a Summer School. This will probably take you out of your current university and could give you contacts to apply for a PostDoc position elsewhere. While working on your PhD could take an undergraduate ...


1

None of my first three (UK) degrees formally name the subject at all: Bachelor of Arts, Master of Science, Master of Arts. And in due course, I hope, my Doctor of Philosophy degree will be similarly silent (and I think it should be: why should research degrees be shoehorned into some librarian's classification system?). You just have to explain in your CV ...


3

As Buffy's answer says, BSc in Physics, or its variants, are OK. However, if you want to have an official English equivalence of your title, ask to the student's office the Diploma Supplement, which is a bilingual document (Italian and English) aimed at better describing your academic qualifications in an international context, explaining also some details ...


3

If this is for formal use then state it exactly as it appears from your university and give any translation that is logically correct. But BS in Physics or BSc (Physics) or Bachelor of Science (Physics) or similar would all be universally recognized in the English speaking world. For informal usage (i.e. no legal implications whatever) then either of your ...


2

I seriously doubt that it matters, but you might want to develop the story with your new colleagues at some point. The story is interesting, not terrible. It is a bit unusual, that is all. In fact, it is in a lot of ways the most honest answer rather than the most bureaucratic answer. Relax. Develop a nice story and become a legend.


2

There is now a trend towards offering assistant-professor-level positions explicitly with tenure track. Recent examples can be found for Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, France, Luxembourg and Germany. This trend seems to be supported by some political initiatives. For example, Germany recently started a program to establish 1000 tenure-track professorships ...


0

Talk about it frankly, with your supervisor. A supportive supervisor is able to understand your situation, and due to his experience in the field may even help you out. You say you have no publications, but you probably already some preliminary results or findings: these will probably be assigned to the care of another postdoc if you quit. In my opinion ...


11

Arguably, doing a PHD is supposed to be exactly the preparation you speak of. It is the first time in your education when you are most certainly expected to transform from the mere consumption of Mathematics to also producing new results; the general idea, however, is not that you simply start doing so, but rather that you have an advisor who guides this ...


0

What is your purpose with your pure math study? If deepening your math knowledge, that's OK. Still, you can have struggles as your classmates will be having math bachelor degrees, they know a lot more about mathematics and see mathematics from a different angle than you. Proofs everywhere. Pure math students live 24-hours for mathematics, it's their ...


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