New answers tagged

1

Normally the sponsorship would be irrelevant to your CV, but in the unlikely case that you were invited by the company instead of the conference, you should specify that in your CV. My expectation is that the organization of the conference presentations and the sponsorships are completely disconnected. The sponsorship is simply an opportunity for a company ...


0

The only reason to apply to a MS program first would be to get some extra credits/experience with higher-level courses which may be needed for PhD programs at better schools. If you already have all that covered and want to do research, going straight for PhD makes more sense. In most departments these days they award MS just for failing your PhD quals, so ...


1

You can put anything on your CV that you are proud of and that you think might be useful for someone to know. It is hard for anyone but yourself to really judge that. If it was paid and could be interpreted as a bribe, then it would be problematic, but otherwise probably ok. So ask yourself, were they just currying favors or did they really want to know what ...


2

Actually, in the US, applying for a doctoral degree is almost always preferable to applying for a masters. The reason is that doctoral admission almost always comes with some sort of funding and masters admission seldom does. The advice is to apply to several institutions that cover a fairly wide range of "rankings". If you apply to only one or two ...


-1

Many colleges will not sponsor visas because it is inconvenient and there is a risk the visa will not be awarded. Some colleges will sponsor visas. So yes, it is possible, but not likely.


3

H1B visas in the United States are intended for specialty workers and are appropriate for individuals with PhDs using those skills to teach students. H1B visas are awarded through a lottery system. Fortunately, non-profit organizations, including universities, are exempt from this lottery and can obtain H1B visas much easier. This visa is the most typical ...


1

From my experience I say that chances are it won't hurt and it won't help much either. There's no reason not to do it (if clearly marked as "under review") but don't expect it to make much of a difference.


4

Obviously, we cannot predict how any individual committee member will react to this. However, I think it is quite common to list 'in review' papers on a CV. Two caveats: If the number of 'in review' papers seems unusually high (compared to your past output, and submission/review rates typical for your field) people may start to wonder whether these are ...


3

you say it very well: "What motivates me are the research project, the fellowship, the partners within the ITN (involving other very high-rank universities), and my potential supervisor. I believe I could use all these opportunities to create a great network. Maybe, do a postdoc in a high-ranked uni afterward." This is really what counts, more than ...


3

If your publications are in respectable, refereed CS conferences then you would be an extremely competitive candidate for top-20 computer science programs. Many PhD graduates don't have eight publications to their name after five years of intensive research. If you are talking about local conferences, student events, or unrefereed/lightly refereed workshops ...


3

This is important career advice and should be given by someone who you trust who knows you personally. If no one comes to mind, ask your existing professors in the field. As you suspect, there are powerful reputational and network effects from prestigious programs. It would be hard to argue that your employment prospects after graduating Cambridge are ...


-1

As was alluded to in the comments, this really depends. I'm speaking from the perspective of computer science, which on average has a better job market than other disciplines. If you're talking about a research fellowship in very small fields (say, abstract math), you'll probably need to reconsider everything written below. Successful research fellowships ...


1

You're focusing on finding a career counselor. Most career counselors I've known are general purpose, trying to help people with the basics of cover letter and resume construction, the typical flow of the hiring process, etc. Never heard of one specializing in the life sciences or, for that matter, any sciences, but I suppose that might have changed over the ...


2

As someone who has changed fields completely, I wanted to chip in. In my experience, changing between fields (rather than within) is extremely uncommon. I have only met one other person in the last 10 years who has also done so; this is all in Europe, mind you. The entire system of getting a PhD is about (aside from becoming a researcher) gaining very ...


1

There are many more doctorates produced than jobs for them afterwards. This is because grad students are cheap labor. Given that, only the cream of the crop find desirable jobs after the PhD. And many experience exploitation along the way because of the power imbalance with supervisors. You couldn't even get through a regular PhD. Let alone distinguish ...


1

Does this sound doable in general? This sounds doable to me in general (which is rare, because most of the time when failed students ask questions like this I am pretty skeptical of their plans), but probably not at the same institution. The main thing I note from your post is that your previous candidature gave you a full suite of foundation courses in ...


0

I suggest that the sooner you apply the more likely it is to get accepted. You need letters of recommendation, preferably from academics so you can't afford to lose touch with people who know and respect you. But you have a particularly steep hill to climb so you need to be able to demonstrate that you are capable of the work and stress that is required. I ...


1

Most universities in the UK get the majority of their income from undergraduate and postgraduate taught students. Even in a research intensive university most research and teaching (R&T) staff spend more time on teaching than on research. It therefore pays to be able to signal that you value teaching. One way to do that is to say that all/x% of your ...


0

At Plymouth University, attaining FHEA is a condition of passing probation for all teaching personnel on a contract of 50% full-time equivalent or more; and attaining AFHEA is a condition of passing probation for all personnel on a contract less than 50% full-time equivalent, but who have at least 15 hours per year of student contact time. Policy here. ...


1

Can Jim "get research or teaching opportunities ...?" (Answer for the US) YES, at least to teaching. Two- and four-year colleges hire Ph.D. physicists for teaching. Research opportunities will depend on Jim's Ph.D., not on his earlier academic performance.


8

It is possible but not probable. Also depends on what one means by "making it big." Nobel Prize? I mean, that is a vanishingly small percentage of even top graduates of top schools. Make full professor and have the esteem of some colleagues? More probable, but in today's world, where the tenure track is largely disappearing, still hard even for the ...


-1

This is a long comment rather than an answer. TL DR: you should not be pessimistic about your ability. Probably your job-search strategy need some improvements. I am not so familiar with your field but your publication record sounds promising. So it is definitely not an end of road for you. People don't hire you for many reasons unrelated with your ability, ...


1

In short: not knowing you or your life's goals, it is hard to make an assessment, and it is surely impossible to give an objective assessment. So the answers will be opinion-based, even from people claiming to be absoulutely objective. It looks you are still comfortable with your time in the academia, you are open to both worlds ("life in both academia ...


11

Well, for starters, Musk is just trolling. I think he does that often enough that people should recognize it for what it is. The statement has a bit of truth and if you exaggerate it enough you get to his statement. A more accurate portrayal is that most academic publications have a very small audience. Not all, but most. The audience is other specialists in ...


0

Summer internships will help with a bit of the insight you need.


3

So, while this might not apply as much to your position as a PhD student/postdoc, I want to chip in with a slightly different perspective for a bit of completeness. Many answers compare doing research outside of the regular 9-5 to doing art, or practising a sport outside of regular working hours, and saying nobody is surprised when professional writers or ...


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