New answers tagged

0

A UK-based answer: yes, you need the letters. Yes, a letter from a supervisor is worth more than a letter from a module convener (teaching the student as part of a big group) but then it is generally better if this was an advanced class of five as opposed to a Year-One course of 200. Let me give two examples at the extremes of the range. I once did have a ...


1

Yes, you can try to negotiate but be prepared for the possibility that your requests won't be met and you'll have to resort to accepting the offer from University 2. The simplest way to start negotiations is just to write to the department chair at University 1 (possibly with a cc to the professor you are interested in working with) and to say that you are ...


1

I question the "fit" with uni 1. The postdoc is a glorified teaching job, with a load that seriously compromises academic output i.e. further career prospects. Uni 2 on the other hand seems to have everything going for it. Without wishing to seem rude, I suspect the "fit" here consists of factors such as: partner lives in that town, want to stay there; ...


1

First, while I would give different advice, that from a prof at UW isn't to be ignored lightly. That prof knows you. But most doctoral students in the US start with just a BS/BA and "collect" an MS along the way to a doctorate. If you can get admitted to a doctoral program do that. If you decide that you don't like it you can probably do enough in most US ...


1

The fact that you say "BTech CSE" and your name indicates that you are doing a course at an engineering college in India. Many people in India take such courses to get a career in "Software" which could mean "Software Engineering" or something else. The mathematics requirements for these careers have been mentioned by others. Many engineering colleges in ...


1

If you want a career as a Software Engineer, you can get a passing grade in your math classes, then get a Software Engineering job that doesn't require much math (there are MANY of these available, I had one of these for a few years). If you really mean you want a career in Computer Science, as in, you want a Ph.D. in Computer Science and a research job in ...


5

I depends on what you mean by a career. For a low level position with not a lot of chance for advancement it would be possible. But almost all CS fields require some fairly deep understanding of at least some parts of mathematics. As user vonbrand notes it is mostly not calculus, though even that can help. But one of the big ideas in CS is being able to ...


4

I could fill a book with my (unorthodox) opinions about this. The arXiv is incredibly conservative about what it will accept, but I find it gratifying that you are thinking about this. Formatting makes a huge difference for a lot of people, due to disability, cognitive style, or just personal preference. Something I imagine in my academic fantasy world, but ...


4

Yes, there is an alternative to de-emphasizing the less important parts (which might possibly impair readability): Emphasize the most important parts. Something you can do is to use clearly outlined boxes with "take-home" messages, like in the example below:


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This is admittedly a non-answer, addressing rather the background of the question. Sifting through complex, dense, pedantic, and difficult-to-read texts is part of research in every field. Every field has bad writers, and every field has highly technical subfields where nothing makes sense without detailed formulas or frameworks. Every field has data ...


1

Not a fan of smaller (inline) text or greyed text. You should be able to use structure, appendices, footnotes, abstract, conclusion, figure captions (left out of your list) as good enough keys to allow the time-pressed reader to skim to key parts and/or inspect details as needed. There is no need for the textual tools you propose given the other tools ...


2

Think of this as an engineering project. You would read the existing literature, and learn about best practices in a field, before even thinking of creating your own new solutions. Do the same sort of web searching, book selection, and reading on formatting technical material for readability as you would if you were trying to contribute to a field of ...


4

Everything you write in a paper should be the answer to the question that is in the reader's mind at that point. So the title needs to answer the question: "Do I bother with this at all?". The abstract, as @user119516 says, answers "do I glance at this?", and the introduction answers "do I read this?". If you follow that principle then it is obvious that ...


6

No, grammatical corrections do not constitute authorship level involvement with the paper. Some other things (in math) that usually don't constitute authorship: Suggesting an example of some interesting behaviour related to a definition or theorem. Suggesting a better way to write a proof. Pointing out small mathematical mistakes and how to fix them (e.g. ...


3

While you have the right to complain to a department head or other individual, my first step would be to discuss this with the instructor themselves. In our department, we would expect a student who complained to at least try to informally resolve the issue with the instructor before escalating it up the chain. If the instructor has a very high grading load,...


27

My personal opinion is no, editing at that level is not sufficient. One can peruse guidelines for your field. Taking Nature as one fairly broad journal, they state: Each author is expected to have made substantial contributions to the conception or design of the work; or the acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data; or the creation of new ...


3

Yes, do complain. The value of a teacher is precisely to do things reading books and watching videos can't do: Answer questions, give feedback, help with gaining insight. If a professor does none of these things, then they're paid for a service they're not providing, and that should concern their employer. So do go to the department head and complain ...


19

What you should prioritize in any paper, mathematics or otherwise, is readability. Organize the paper so that your reader can comfortably follow your argument without a lot of jumping around. In a short, relatively "flat" paper, almost any organization will probably be ok. Flat in the sense of later parts not depending fundamentally on earlier parts. But ...


36

There is no general rule. Different authors have different opinions about this. To my knowledge no mathematics journal has guidelines about this sort of thing. A rule of thumb could be that if your notation is going to be used throughout the paper, then it should be introduced at the beginning in a special section called "notations", "conventions", "...


0

Logistics, routing, navigation systems would fit the bill (I've heard that TomTom has a lot of discrete math people, for example). You may also move in the direction of discrete optimization and then you may sell yourself doing operations research.


1

As far as I know, from my experience in CS, the committee will decide not on the basis of your institution but on the basis of what you have done. Your grades will matter, obviously. You can still be an exceptional mathematician, in this day and age of the internet, institution matters less. But if you have doubts, the best thing to do is to plan and be ...


1

I predict that you will be fine. The admission to a grad/doctoral program depends much (much) more on what you do than on the ranking of the institution you attend. Rankings can be deceiving and no one sorts candidates by the rankings of, for example, news magazines. If you do well and impress people so that you get good letters of recommendation then you ...


0

In the UK many UG courses include a final-year project of your own choice, requiring 3-6 months' part-time work. You could ask about this when applying for your BA course in India, particularly if you are invited for an interview before deciding which institution to go to. The department will offer a choice of at least as many ready-made projects as there ...


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I don't know what ResearchGate is doing, but Google Scholar shows many many more citations: https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&as_sdt=0%2C6&q=walter+rudin&btnG= For example, "Principles of mathematical analysis" has more than 10,000 citations. "Real and complex analysis" has more than 16,600. "Fourier analysis on groups" has 3,500. These ...


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This answer will be a bit orthogonal to the question. But Rudin's place is due to more than the number of papers written and citations. According to the Math Genealogy project, Rudin produced 24 successful PhD students and has 125 "descendants". These numbers are pretty big. Some of his students were, themselves very productive. A professor can be a ...


2

Short answer: Everything. Long answer: Mathematicians are often not (solely) hired for the graphs and algorithms they know, but for the skill to logically dissect a problem, come up with a solution, consider all possible cases, etc. With discrete math, a career in software development would be possible for example. Look for R&D departments or positions ...


5

It depends on the journal. The journals I've been associated with have an online system that gives authors a certain deadline by which they have to submit a revised manuscript -- I suspect that the deadline is often set at 6 months. Authors are reminded of this deadline by an automated email a certain time before the deadline expires. Authors can ask for an ...


1

Note that in many places, engineering is a licensed and regulated profession. One of the requirements may well be a degree from an accredited engineering program. That depends on local laws, of course. The aerospace industry employs a lot of engineers, of course, but not everyone there needs to have an engineering degree. It may well be that, depending on ...


4

If there's no response from the author(s), the manuscript becomes dormant. The status stays as "revise" indefinitely, until one day the journal decides to perform spring cleaning and remove all these dormant manuscripts from the system. An actively-curated journal might have automated systems where, if the revision is not received in the designated time (...


4

The publisher can take no steps toward publishing if they don't have the consent of the author(s). The paper would just sit in limbo until contact is made. I assume the editor will try to make repeated attempts to contact the author, but it may not happen immediately. I assume, here, that the author has not yet passed copyrights to the publisher, so they ...


2

There is now a trend towards offering assistant-professor-level positions explicitly with tenure track. Recent examples can be found for Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, France, Luxembourg and Germany. This trend seems to be supported by some political initiatives. For example, Germany recently started a program to establish 1000 tenure-track professorships ...


2

Most applicants to a mid- to upper-tier math Ph.D. program will be coming directly from an undergraduate program, and the core planks of their application will be their grades, letters of reference from professors, and (in many cases) good performance on mathematics competitions. Some but very few will have published papers in peer-reviewed journals. All of ...


4

The answer to your question is the same as for 50% of the other questions on this website: Talk to your adviser. Find out what the hold-up is, how you can help, what other roles you could take on in the lab to free him from work that holds up his side of the collaboration. Communicate about what your issues are.


2

I guess it depends on whether the person knows about how you (and others) feel about their behavior or not. Case A) You are not sure. When it can't harm you in the future I don't see a reason why you should not provide feedback. As you said in one of your comments yourself: it could help others who have to work with this person. Case B) The person is ...


7

From your description ("final deadline") it sounds as though there is no way to fix the situation with the paper. Moreover, you say have decided not to work with this person again (which seems reasonable). So there is most likely no benefit to be had from expressing your disappointment directly. Frustrating as it may be, cutting your losses and moving on ...


2

Since you have two specific places in mind, it would be best if you go talk to them. Ask U Cincinnati about their success in transferring students to OSU. But you should also visit OSU and talk to their admissions people about what the real cost to you would be. You seem to be assuming things. Perhaps there are scholarships that would reduce the cost. ...


1

I am not aware of a prestige difference. At the institution where I was a postdoc, however, I have noticed at least three practical differences: As a named postdoc, I was employed by the University and thus, in particular, had health insurance. At least one NSF postdoc during my time was, IIRC, classified as a contractor and had to rely on his SO (who was ...


12

Writing single-authored papers in math is extremely common, much more so than in other disciplines. It's not considered a significant achievement on its own in the context of applying for jobs. Writing a paper before the beginning of a PhD is however certainly a big plus for you. But how much this will help depends on the journal: if you had the misfortune ...


1

Can you say what gives you this impression? Because I’ve been around for a while and have never heard anything like what you are describing (in fact I’ve never heard the word combination “endowed postdoc”, so although I get what you’re referring to, I think it’s best not to use this term). If I had to guess, I think you’re conflating prestige with practical ...


2

Very few postdoc positions are endowed, and most of those are at universities that are already very good. As a consequence, the practical implications of being on such a position are relatively small: If you get one, you're pretty much by definition already at a good university, and the delta in prestige is pretty negligible. What matters are (i) your ...


3

Here at U. Michigan, our first round of offers went out in mid-January. As those offers got declined, we have made offers to replace them, trickling out a few at a time. Many of our first round offers have now learned that they received NSF postdocs's somewhere else, so we made several offers following the NSF announcement. Our first offers had a deadline of ...


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