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2

In the year 2021, you should budget about 2000 EUR or USD per publication in your grant application. For certain funding agencies, you should expect to not actually get the money if you receive the grant.


6

Well the easy answer is to look at the possible journals you would publish in and see what they typical charge. But you have to be careful, I've found some funding agencies wont fund publication charges (either directly, or because that funding comes from a separate agreement with a University). The funder may also have a cap for how much can be charged to ...


3

I second others' comments that acknowledgements are low-cost and the indirect support of a scholarship in allowing one to engage in research may be sufficient reason to include it. But here's another way of thinking about it. Many agencies you will get funding from for your academic work are only the lowest members of a towering hierarchy of agencies. As an ...


10

It depends on the scholarship but if the work is part of the studies, and the scholarship is for the studies, it may have to be acknowledged, even if the topic of study is not specified. (Some Grad. Scholarships work that way.) In most cases I know where an acknowledgment is required or expected, the scholarship comes with explicit instructions on what ...


17

If the scholarship indirectly gives you the opportunity to conduct the research, for example by freeing up time that may otherwise be spent in a part time job, it would seem appropriate to acknowledge it. It might depend on the level of unrelated, an undergraduate research project in your university (yes) vs a community project litter picking (no). Still, ...


5

(As far as I know) If the scholarship is unrelated to the study you are trying to publish, you do not have to acknowledge the funding source/scholarship.


7

Quite a lot of funded projects are unsuccessful, though few may be willing to admit it. Whether you can return the money is up to the funding agency. I'd guess that few of them would require it, absent outright fraud, and many might not even be prepared to do it. But, if you really want to do this, contact someone, such as a "program officer" at ...


1

You need to pick up the phone and call the NSF. And then they will probably tell you that in a grey area such as yours, you need to submit a completed application and they will determine your eligibility after they receive it.


2

I believe NSF is expecting top students that will get the few NSF scholarships available are going to go directly from a bachelor's to a PhD or MS+PhD program, rather than doing a masters in between. Presumably they get plenty of qualified applications from this applicant pool so there isn't any need to expand the pool. They're not looking to add-on funding ...


8

I don't know if they will reply to you, but you should try contacting Google scholar. Here is their email: scholar-support@google.com (found on this page, under the court opinion question). Some other ideas are: make an academic webpage with all the relevant info, so people can check that try recreating your profile after it gets deleted in addition to ...


6

I've known people to be in similar circumstances, though due to funding crunches rather than the pandemic. You should be able to work with your graduate program to find a suitable resolution, either with office staff or the chair of the graduate program or someone they designate. There may also be something like a "first year advisory committee" ...


4

Yes, they should complain. To whom is difficult to answer without being closer to the situation; I would have some idea in my US organization but not about what the organization is like at your friend's university. For me, step one would probably have been with the office folk in my grad program. They'd be acutely aware that this isn't normal and have ...


3

(My context is math at an R1 in the U.S.) Our usual admission criterion is on merit first, and then have number of admissions limited by our capacity. The point I want to make is that "capacity" does not only mean "number of Research Asistantships or Teaching Assistantships or Fellowships" we have, but, also, on the number of faculty we ...


1

Yes, but make that clear in your application or email a professor directly.


2

This would depend on the place and probably isn't uniform for physics in the US. In most places the funding decisions and the acceptance are done separately. If you don't qualify when needing funding then funding isn't going to help. There may be a few positions (spread over a lot of places) where it might matter if the lab you join is grant funded. If you ...


6

Breakthroughs from outside academia are nothing new. The light bulb was not invented by a professor, nor was the telephone. In fact, you might be interested in stories about the Bell Labs and the Xerox Labs as examples of research institutions run by companies. As such, most professors will probably neither be surprised nor bothered or concerned in the least ...


0

Professors in subjects like CIS and physics receive many such emails every year. So far, some large percentage (99%? more?) have turned out to be from cranks.* So, even if your contribution is the exception, many of them will disregard it. Perhaps the thing to do is write it up carefully, and submit to a reputable journal. They are more likely to give ...


11

Many "breakthroughs" outside academia are secret and professors never hear about them. This includes trade secrets and military secrets. Achievements from industrial research labs which do become public are treated in the same way that achievements from academic labs are treated. Most science, including the really good stuff, is incremental ...


11

Yes, you should decline to do an interview if there is any definite reason that you would not accept the position, to save time both for yourself and the interviewer(s). However, this circumstance sounds a bit odd to me, and I'd recommend clarifying before/while declining the invitation. Something like: My understanding is that deadlines for funding ...


2

It's not unusual because it doesn't happen at all. I think you have a fundamental misconception of how funding and tuition for PhD students works in the UK compared to the the USA. Firstly, if you are offered a PhD place in the UK, this should come with the costs of tuition covered and an annual tax free stipend (~£15,000). You never receive any money for ...


3

I have studied/worked at three different UK universities. I have never heard of tuition fees being waved for TAs. Usually TAs are paid an hourly rate in addition to any funding package/scholarship they may have. There are almost always restrictions on how many hours a graduate student can work at the university, the maximum amount of money you could make ...


2

A resubmission means you submit, don't get the grant but do okay (you can actually resubmit any score even a non discussion, but whether it's likely to be a winner the second time is maybe questionable. Though it's also not too strange to submit a vastly improved proposal and still get a worse score. Different reviewers different result), then resubmit to ...


2

There is quite a bit variety in how funding for UK PhDs works, but I am not aware of any situation where you would apply for a scholarship via the university AFTER an admissions interview. Instead, I'd expect one of the following setups: A. For a university with a lot of attached funding (eg Cambridge), you indicate that you want to be considered for ...


2

The best letters are from those who both know you well and can make an honest prediction about your success. Instructors, with whom you have little real contact, are much less valuable as they can say very little. Perhaps there are other people from your undergraduate years that fulfill the "best writers" criteria. They would probably be better ...


2

We gratefully acknowledge X for in-kind contributions. X is the legal name of the corporation. Also mention any conflicts of interest related to the corporation.


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