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2

I'd suggest you make an appointment with your director or studies or ombudsman (or whoever else is in charge). You should explain the problem to them in an honest way like you did in this question, and ask them what are your options and what they recommend. At the very least you need to inform them that there are some issues with your supervisor, so that ...


2

However, come time for the actual conference, my advisor had switched projects on me, and what I presented was nothing at all related to the session of that day. changed her mind when I went out and actually got an offer she will take my inquiries as a personal attack The past few years feel like a textbook definition of Gaslighting Your ...


1

That really sucks. I had a messy situation during my MSc which took me over 3 years, in part due to supervisors being flimsy and in part due to me losing my own motivation. There was also a project which changed direction halfway through, into the exact opposite of what I wanted. I had told them ahead of time, that the one thing I refused to do was work ...


0

Normal ? regrettably I would consider this semi normal. A good situation ? absolutely not. Is the situation likely to get any better? from your description definitely not. As you say that you only started 1.5 years ago, and you are in a bad situation, change groups, and if that isn't possible leave or change university.


11

In my experience in the US, computers and their parts are considered part of overhead, as are things like desks, office chairs, etc. When you get a grant, part of it goes to "you", and part of it goes to the university as overhead - they use this to keep the lights on and for other various expenses that you don't directly see, but they also often make some ...


14

I strongly recommend that you talk to your department chair and ask for their help. The situation as I understand it is that you obtained confirmation in writing from university employees that the equipment you wanted to purchase would be covered by the grant and you would get reimbursed. Now the institution is refusing to reimburse you. This is pretty ...


20

What you need to do is work it out locally. If necessary, the grant funder may need to make a judgement. But it seems like you were trying to get around a restriction by somewhat questionable means. Not necessarily ethically dubious means, but questionable. A pedantic interpretation of the statement in the grant, and ignoring its likely intent is what got ...


0

I think, you should build some patience and 3 days is not a long time of waiting. However, various reasons for the delay could be: You may not be only one student. He might be busy in research and administration. He might have traveled for a conference or something. He might have personal reasons for the delay. He definitely has higher priority works than ...


2

Apart from asking your institution's research support unit (if there is one) as suggested in other answers, try to get in touch with colleagues with grants similar to yours (in terms of grant call, scale of the funding and scientific area) and see if they can show you their budget. In my experience when I was new to grant requests, this was the single most ...


1

If you are lucky your University has a research support unit, which you tell what you need and they create the budget for you, then tell you what parts of that budget that funding agency has and has not funded in the pasted, what items you might have forgotten etc. After some back and forth you get the final budget.


4

From the detailed description of the call: The so-called "rare subjects" (Kleine Fächer) often represent a comprehensive, significant and future-oriented canon of knowledge that is highly relevant for interdisciplinarity, internationality, and innovation. […] At the same time, these subjects are often characterized by precarious structures within ...


1

It varies, so you need to check with the program. For example, if the grad students are unionized at that institution, the CBA might specify that the PI can't sweeten a grad student's base stipend out of a grant. There might also be distinctions between what's permissible during the academic year and what's permissible during the summer.


6

In my experience, “guaranteed funding” means that (depending on field) you will be either working for a PI who has grant money to pay you or working as a TA (with the possible exception of your first year, where their may be general department support while you find an advisor). Because graduate stipends are typically on a pay scale, working on a grant can ...


0

I doubt that it would happen. You don't say what the stipend is for. If it is an RA then you are already being paid for research help and it might actually come out of any grants. If it is a TA then you will have certain (teaching related) duties for that and the research project is probably more associated with your own degree than as an "assistant". But, ...


11

According to the yearly NIH report, in 2018, a total of 625 NIH Research Project grants (R01) were awarded, and the total cost for NIH (funding + other costs) of these grants was $347,466,328. This averages to $347,466,328/625, or about $556,000 of funding per year in one grant, or $2,780,000 in total for a 5-year grant The Specific Aims application ...


5

R01s are the main grants given by the US NIH to research labs. They typically have a single PI but can have some other co-PIs, and depending on scope are worth a few hundred thousand USD per year over five years. The "specific aims page" is a 1-page summary of the goals of the grant, kind of like an abstract. So, this tweet is connecting A) the words on 1 ...


2

If the contract for the grant is finalized, you can list it as an achievement on your CV.


5

I now understand why some Japanese commit suicide, they find no exit. I find myself in a very similar situation. I'm a scientist; therefore, I cannot and will not take ANY job, but a science & engineering job. As a scientist, you should be able to realize easily that your financial expectations are completely irrational. In France, only the top 3% ...


4

Considering an absolute salary range without considering the location can lead to erroneous expectations. That salary range can be the bare minimum to survive in, say, Zurich, Switzerland, but would give you a fairly wealthy life in, for instance, Italy, Spain or Poland. Speaking with my European colleagues, the PhD salary range across most European ...


4

US institutions generally publish their standard PhD student stipend. Here is MIT, which is likely at the top of the scale. You can see that it is around USD 3300 per month, and in accordance with usual US conventions, this is gross pay, before taxes (someone at this income level would pay very roughly around 10% of their income in federal, state and ...


9

I can speak for Europe. You can forget to earn 5000 euro for a PhD or a PostDoc. If you dont find a job you must adapt yourself. There are many people that do not find a researcher or engineer job after one PhD and many PostDocs. It is not good to pursue another PhD, it is legally possible, but in practice nobody will hire a person for a PhD with already ...


1

The grant has been awarded to you, so you are responsible for making decisions on how to allocate the funding. If a bad choice results in less success or output, this will reflect badly on you much more than it will on other grant participants. So if you do not consider that adding this person will positively contribute to the results, you should not add ...


1

If I get you right, you think to mention your employer as a funding source because it pays your salary and you use that to finance your private research? This would not be appropriate. It is up to you what you do with your money and as you state, your employer has nothing to do with your research work. Because you do your research without an academic ...


2

For this project, your "affiliation" is independent researcher. Your "funding" is just self funded. Both of those are well known and perfectly acceptable. But be sure that your employer has no claim on your independent work. Some will have a claim, or will claim that they do. For some employers, permission is necessary.


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