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0

Argentina. I did my BA for free there. And my MA almost for free.


2

Firstly, congratulations on finishing! It's a big achievement. If I were you I would be applying for post-doc positions and/or industry positions ASAP. It depends on whether you want to stay in academia or work in industry. Think about what you want to do and don't get misled by your ex-advisors mixed messages - if he really wanted to continue working ...


0

Typically Australian universities would use Honors 1 equivalence for allocating scholarships both to locals and international students. So the 85 would be that of an equivalent mark. I have found one document from QUT that explains this, you should search something similar for the university you are applying for. https://cms.qut.edu.au/__data/assets/...


1

It may be GPA. It may be rank in your class. It may be your percentile on the graduate exams. I agree with @GrotesqueSI: The answer is to email the professor again and request clarification.


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Actually the practice is old, though using Facebook may be new. My old alma mater regularly sends out publications and news items "promoting" research at the university. I think the intent is more to promote the university itself, however, though some of the news items are worth a look if the research suggests new breakthroughs in, say, medicine. And, I ...


2

For any reasonable understanding of the terms, French public Universities are open admission and free. To give a bit more details, one is allowed to enroll in a university provided one has a high-school degree. At the moment, about 80% of high-school students eventually succeed at getting the required high-school degree. Even without such a degree, there ...


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I can mention the case of Argentina. All public universities are free, with open admission since the early 1980s. Anyone with a high school diploma (and there's no comprehensive final exam, or qualifying exam, etc. after high school) that applies gets in, including foreigners that have residency (which is super-easy to get). There is a limited possibility ...


1

Not sure if something hasn't changed in the last years, but it has been like that in Latvia since 1991(regain of independence): There is a (fairly large) number of state sponsored slots in 2-4 major state universities. To qualify for those slots, you have to be above the threshold in entrance exam results. The threshold depends on the number of ...


2

I'm going to offer an answer, partly from the U.S. perspective, highlighting information gathered in the comments, chat, and other answers. In both Europe and at U.S. lower-level (community) colleges, entry to the college usually requires a high school diploma and no other qualifications. However, the "quality control" that I would expect for the European ...


4

California isn't a country, but our community college system does have open admissions as well as being in effect free. It's free in the sense that all students receive at least an ~80% subsidy, and most are 100% subsidized. There are various programs that allow students to completely get free tuition. There is a need-based program that something like half ...


14

I have taught at both at two Swedish universities and one American university (Ivy League). The main difference is really the philosophy - in the US, it is difficult to get in, but once admitted, it is not that hard to stay with passing grades. In Sweden, getting admitted is relatively easy (which implies a much more diverse body of students), but the ...


3

Scotland has free undergraduate full-time degrees, and the part-time distance-learning Open University has no entry requirements for most of its degrees (access courses are available for those who haven't studied up to age 18). And as far as I'm aware there are no limits on student numbers. http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/do-it/ready-for-success Scottish ...


29

Well, it depends how strict you are with the terms "open" and "free": Open: Most European countries I am familiar with (Austria, Germany, Sweden, Switzerland) are actually fairly open in terms of admission. There are always some basic requirements (e.g., candidates need to have a high school diploma or comparable), and sometimes there are entry ...


44

Here is an overview of the situation in Germany, where there are no tuition fees for Bachelor and Master programs at public universities (though student union fees and public transport fees totaling 60-130 EUR per semester still apply). For Bachelor degrees, the general requirements for admission to any German university are (1) proof of knowledge of the ...


1

I would say the sentence already looks polite enough. You could change it to Should you be interested in my research project, I would be happy to send you the complete research proposal and answer any questions you might have. But I do not expect this sentence to have any effect on the chances of success of your application. The content of your proposal ...


4

Now the university is asking me to pay back the tuition waiver guaranteed by the sham RA position. Don't do that. US universities should not ask students to repay tuition wavers. Maybe if the student committed fraud, but not because of withdrawal. I cannot request a transcript to show to schools I am applying to this year In your application, say "I ...


10

If you can't afford it, you can't afford it. Do not lie to another school, just tell them the truth, without the words "sham" and "bait-and-switch" etc. Tell them you attended for one month and withdrew, and can prove that, but there is now a dispute over tuition, which you thought was waived. They want you to pay 20K, which you are contesting, so they ...


0

In addition to the answer by None, who correctly identifies that the paper will most likely not be included in the conference proceeding if none of the authors attend, there can be additional repercussions. As far as I know, all the peer-reviewed conferences (in Computer Science) require at least one author to attend the conference and present the work in ...


2

The TL;DR is that a PIs job security, promotion prospects and grant funding is unfortunately based not on the quality of the research they produce, but on the prestige of the journal they publish it in. To pass probation on my position I needed a publication with Impact factor > 10 within three years of starting. To keep my job I need a so called 4* paper ...


1

I think the problem is that you "misunderstand" the sections, and whether that is right or wrong, you have to change that perception. I have a PI with a similar problem, and she decided to resubmit and "play along". R01s are hard to get funded when you're new. Plan on that -- average age of new PIs in the 40s -- not 30s. That said, I would say if you ...


7

Note: as pointed out by Pieter Naaijkens, PRL indeed has a publication fee, making most of the original answer incorrect. I've rewritten the answer as a result. When one pays a publication fee that isn't open access, one is effectively paying the publisher to distribute the paper. Most (subscription) publishers and journals are quite content to distribute ...


1

Can I phrase this another way? If your journal article could be listed on Bing for free, but Google for $1k, would you pay for Google? I think a lot of people would. In general, whether reputation for the journal (Nature is such a great journal!) or the journal is well known (yes, of course I've heard of Science!), readership is important. People pay ...


5

I suggest that you go and make the best use of the time, both at the conference and otherwise. You have a long plane ride in both directions. You have evenings if you forgo socializing. You have time between sessions to review course material if you have some notes on index cards or otherwise that are easy to carry. You might even be successful in begging ...


1

First, you have to check the conference website. Most (if not all) conferences state clearly that submitting a paper REQUIRES at least one of the authors to attend to present the paper, and that if you do not, your paper is out (will not be included in the proceeding), so you have to look for another place. Everyone is busy, but we must plan and respect ...


2

Depending on your program, most if not all recommend applying for external scholarships prior to acceptance into the program (as if you are already going to attend). For the big government scholarships, the application date for study beginning next Fall has already past, but provincial awards (such as OGS in Ontario) are open until early December. Internal ...


2

I'm guessing that the intent of this is to determine if you are in the somewhat rare case of not needing funding. If you can say that you will be funded from other sources (scholarships from another country, for example) then funding is one factor the committee need not consider. But if you need funding, then they also need to find ways to provide it if you ...


3

Just a clarification for some of the above answers, from an American faculty member in the humanities. Funding in the humanities (like everywhere else in the academy) is a contractual matter. In my experience, all funding offers are processed by a graduate school or other university-level office, not the individual department. Letters are sent early in the ...


1

I have seen people get into harvard within 3.20 range and I have seen people get rejected with perfect 4.00 from "lesser" schools. From what I have seen it is more about what a transcript / application tells rather than whatever the GPA is. Espcially, you having a masters degree, there are many stories an application could / should tell. I fear no one here ...


2

The situation you describe is a risk that all universities take when they hire faculty and give them startup packages/grants. Yes, sometimes it happens that people leave after only a year or two after having spent some of their startup money. Well, that’s just life. If your university gave you funds to use and you used them, and did so in good faith, the ...


4

Most grants are not given in a lump sum, but in a sequence of increments---typically 12-months increments, but sometimes shorter or longer. It is true that when you get a chunk of money for a increment, there is typically quite a bit of flexibility in how you spend it within a phase (though some funder require notification if you go significantly "off plan"...


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