New answers tagged

6

The only real answer is go talk to your supervisor. And do it sooner rather than later. If you have 3 months left and your cells take 2 months to grow, then every day counts. You need to e-mail him soon. Today would be best, tomorrow would be okay, don't wait longer than that. If you are concerned that your backup idea sounds like "giving up" then ...


4

I'm really sorry to hear about this situation. School officials can not do anything, and changing my advisor after four years of hard work will result in a complete reboot. This surprises me. Every university differs, but in general you should bring these sorts of issues to your Associate Chair/Director, etc. of Graduate Studies in your department. If they ...


6

Yes, you could ask your question, but you could also ask a different one as well. "What do these dying cells really tell us and can we gain some scientific insight from that?" I suspect that you could formulate it better, but the idea that a "failed experiment" yields nothing is false. Negative data is still data. The fact that something ...


-1

Do not take the professor as a supervisor. The constructive way to deal with irritating circumstances is to go ahead, not to waste time on recrimination and attribution of blame for the past. Why did they spend time on complaining and belittling you when it could have been spent on answering the question and mentioning neutrally the normal sources of ...


3

I'm going to be just as brusque as your professor. Did you attempt to obtain this information from one of the many other sources that I would assume exist for a student to know the schedule for their class' final project? For instance, class materials and web sites, the class chat log, or other students. If you didn't, you're showing disrespect for your ...


0

If a superior replies to me like that I would first try to determine wrong doing on my part, if you are in the wrong the best course of action is first an apology and second a written commitment from you to do better next time. If your investigation shows no wrongdoing on your part, very briefly explain that back and express your regret that a ...


8

I'm moving this from comment section. You seem to feel that your only fault was not listening properly, but actually, asking the professor was rude, immature and unprofessional. Did you really think they did not announce the final project schedule because they'd rather reply to an e-mail by every student in the class? The only acceptable way of asking such ...


5

You need to find the right advisor for You This not only means learning about how the advisor behaves but also about how you react emotionally and academically to different advisor styles. I mentioned several times in the chat box in class. Did not you attend or did not you listen? There are people for which this type of comment will get under their skin, ...


4

Yes, of course you can ask, and give the reason. But it may be moot depending on your field. In some fields, alphabetical listing is the norm. In others it is vitally important and fought over. If you are in a field in which it is important, then I hope your advisor is a bit generous in this since you are starting out. But if you aren't the main driver of ...


6

Personally that would make me think twice about having them as an advisor. Sure it would have been good for you to see their answer in the chat, but as a grad student you are committing ~5 years of your life to help them in research as you become a full fledged math PhD - that's a big deal and they need to have some level of respect for you that I don't ...


1

I think there is an opportunity here for you to learn something about the environment you are considering to go into. Your question shows that you are not completely aware of the academic life and the environment you may end up spending significant time in. I strongly recommend to make good use of this opportunity before you consider starting a PhD. What ...


3

Advising students is not easy for a beginner. I have tried and failed myself more then once, and I'm still amazed of the many ways one can fail at the task. What you need to do: set a schedule set objectives for each set expectations set clear deadlines advise students, never work for them do not allow students to control your schedule be ready to drop some ...


7

The life of a professor, as their career progresses is never getting easier, at least if they are serious about their research. There is a neverending stream of academic chores (grant writing, teaching, faculty meetings, conferences) and in between there is a little time left for research. But progress in research is critical since everything else depends on ...


10

of the course I am auditing One possibility is that you have (a) an overworked professor, (b) who gets asked little questions like this over & over enough to get annoyed and who (c) appreciates these questions even less from someone who is only auditing the course. As I understand it (having been out of college for a very long time, but Google'd it to ...


2

Can I still be a successful PhD student if I pursue deep natural language processing on my own without getting much help from my supervisor? The core task of a PhD supervisor is not necessarily to be an expert on the content of your research. Sure, it will help if there is some overlap, but even if you pursue a research direction that is well aligned with ...


66

As an external observer, what strikes me here is: A) yes, the answer is unnecessarily rude. Everybody can have bad days, but if this person routinely reacts aggressively and loses their temper whenever dealing with perceived "failures" from others, then they seem a poor match as an advisor for you, as they probably would continuously drag you down ...


0

It seems you have unrealistic expectations of what a PhD is supposed to involve. Who cares if you don't publish in a top journal? It seems your goal is not to do actual research. You are the one who is supposed to pick a research topic. Your advisor simply advises you how to attack it. You are doing original research, which, by definition means nobody is an ...


77

He/she is probably very busy, and has repeated the same message probably N times. Also, we all assume students will find the required information by themselves. Nowadays, I find that students simply don't spend the time to look for information. Their first instinct is to simply to message me, and hope that I will solve their problems for them; this is ...


2

This question is very difficult to answer in general as PhD programs and their rules are hardly standardized in Germany, every university can mostly do as they please. In my research institute (STEM) PhD students are employed workforce and as such your contract cannot start before you present yourself to HR at least once in person. But this does not seem to ...


30

the professor has told me several times he would be very interested in having me as a PhD student. So, I guess, he may not appreciate the fact that I have decided to pursue another area with another supervisor Could be, if this person is vindictive and unethical. But if they are a decent human being they would write a gushing letter about how they would ...


7

I don't understand why you are concerned unless you happen to be in a place where it is common for an admissions committee to reach out for comment to others not mentioned in an application. I think and hope that such a thing is considered improper almost everywhere. And, therefore, rare. Your application materials contain certain required items, probably ...


0

The offer isn't CV worthy, but the CV gap and personal journey merit a mention somewhere, perhaps in a personal statement or a covering letter. (Maybe on a CV, if there's no other means.) For instance, My PhD journey started over a year ago, when I applied and was accepted to [highly prestigious university], Canada. Unfortunately, my offer was eventually ...


5

Well, yes, but also no. Permanent academic positions that are not professorships are relatively rare in Germany. Since most researchers want to eventually have a permanent position, it is in the interest of all long-term researchers to eventually become "berufungsfähig" (suitable for becoming a tenured associate or full professor). The vast ...


-4

I don't know the specifics of Germany, but in general an academic career doesn't depend that much on the PhD, let alone on the level of honor given to the degree. If you apply for postdoc positions at the international level, people are unlikely to even look at the level of honor because these differ a lot by country so they do not provide a standard ...


3

(Written as if directly to your friend.) Depending on where you are, "starting over" may not mean starting at the beginning. In a new program you would likely be already more advanced than you once were. In particular, you may be much closer to passing any necessary comprehensive exams. And you have a more sophisticated view of research in the ...


4

You may try to either visit him during his office hours (more or less Krebto's suggestion) or you might contact someone at the department who is in close contact with your advisor. The latter worked for me a few years ago when I had to get in touch with someone who simply ignored my (and other students') e-mails. After a few weeks, I asked a colleague of his ...


1

This will, of course, depend on the specifics of the class and how your institution allows it. At mine, one set of classes in the applied mathematics department was Multivariable Calculus (also known as Calculus III) and Differential Equations (Calculus IV). Although the former seems to be a prerequisite for the latter, this is actually not the case; I ...


2

The policy will be in the prerequisite requirements for a class, in your case, Intermediate Spanish II. In the U.S., you will find prerequisite requirements in the official catalog of the institution, and probably elsewhere. Somewhere in the official catalog there may be a policy about whether prerequisites can be overridden, and if so how.


0

How can something like this be investigated since there are no mechanism in place to limit what a supervisor contributes to his students' thesis? I doubt it is true that there are no mechanisms for this. Academics are generally bound by broad ethics rules in relation to their research and supervision, and this would almost certainly fall within the scope ...


5

The goal of a master's degree is (among others) learning the first steps of doing research. Most master students are not great at that yet. That's what your advisor is for. They are the persons that can help you to become a better researcher, on how to structure your thesis, on what your priorities should be, how to approach people who might be experts in ...


1

It sounds like he's too busy but doesn't oppose the idea of having the paper submitted. I suggest that you define the timeline yourself, while giving him the chance to "opt out" of it: Dear Prof. X, thank you, again, very much for your feedback and advice. Since I have addressed all open issues, I plan to submit the article on <date in 2 or 3 ...


0

It seems that your advisor has not done a great job mentoring you in your post-PhD job search. It's typical for advisors to at least forward on job announcements to students on the hunt, and these tend to be pretty widely circulated. I'm a postdoc and I get emails like this asking me to forward on to good candidates, so even junior professors should have ...


6

Your last sentence makes me think that the question you ask in the title may not be the question you're really interested in. If you feel lost, talk to people. Friends, family, professionals, whichever you feel most comfortable with, but get help. How much does the future career of a PhD student matter to the advisor? The subsequent careers of the collective ...


3

"I only take students with a lot of experience in my field, because I don't have the resources to train them adequately". I don't think there's a reason or need to come up with some excuse that may not hold up to scrutiny, or look bad when students in different situations start comparing notes. In this case, I don't see any real problem with the ...


8

Assuming you really do not want to work with them and not even check them out if they are suitable candidates, the response is simply: "I do not currently have available slots for grad students." Not funding, but "slots". It means time, nerves, energy, whatever else could come into their mind. If they have no funding, you say you have no ...


1

Contact the University Thesis Office regarding policies regarding professors making edits. Maybe what he is doing is sanctioned; maybe there is a strict policy against it. The prof. won't tell you, and the college won't shake the boat. University administration offers the only chance of independent administration.


-5

Just like any other situation where bribery is suspected, a sting operation can be used by law enforcement to get proof. Find someone who could plausibly offer a bribe. Give them immunity to punishment. Have them offer a bribe. If the bribe is accepted, you have proof. You can also investigate financial records, but this is much harder.


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