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11

It's a completely neutral reply. I write these emails to qualified candidates about once a week myself. It is, in essence saying: "You've contacted the wrong guy. I'm not making the decision about admission. We'll talk again if and once you've been accepted and here." In other words, I don't think you can draw any kind of inference from the email -- neither ...


0

Surely you should have agreed the “theme” with your advisor for it to be accepted and ratified by the institution. If you have not, then you might need to choose a different topic.


15

See this from the point of the department: They are giving out diplomas saying "we have seen the work produced by this student and certify that it meets these requirements". If there are no specialists in a given topic, how can they certify that you meet those requirements? When you choose a department for doing your masters then it is up to you to determine ...


3

Approach an advisor that you already have a relationship with. Explain that you are an excellent student, providing grades as evidence, if that's true. (If it isn't, I wonder whether pursuing this topic can be recommended.) Explain why you are passionate for artificial general intelligence and symbolic methods, why the research [is] of utmost importance, ...


5

He has been reading a book that is related to the paper only in title. This along with him not making progress might be a sign that he is missing pre-requisites. Maybe the paper requires mathematical tools he is not familiar, or has several words which are new to him. Usually, I'd go with some assisted reading/reviewing. This is very harsh, so be careful ...


2

There are too many possibilities to give a definite answer. But one thing stands out: He was not able to read the introduction and present an overview of the paper's method and main results. The student may have a learning disability, like ADHD or dyslexia. Most universities have a service that will test students, diagnose the problem, and provide them ...


1

You paint a pretty bad picture. I have no reason to doubt its accuracy. It is common enough to be worrying, but not universal. But, you haven't written any positive aspects - any upside. I suggest you consider whether there is an upside. If not, you would be well-advised to find another advisor or even a different institution. Some advisors can be ...


4

Is it wise to just ignore and do my research independently and forget about her? I mean just considering having no advisor and do my own PhD by myself since she clearly stated that I should define my problem and I think I can solve a problem as long as she leaves me free and give me some time. This is probably the worst thing you could do. In order to ...


1

First of all, you are not alone. Half the reason this forum exists is that getting a Ph.D. is an incredibly challenging endeavor. Funding security, compatibility with your advisor, relevance of the research topic-- all of this plays a big role in whether someone completes a Ph.D. I probably don't have enough experience or might not think it through but ...


2

Should I change my lab/advisor? Yes. All your complaints suggest you have the wrong advisor.


0

If I read your question correctly, it seems that you want to do interdisciplinary work. That is highly valued in some places, even if it is a bit unusual. But to make it happen requires that you have an advisor who is on-board with the concept and that you have sufficient additional resources across the fields of study. This might mean a co-advisor. And if ...


1

(slight edit to clarify my perspective after reading Buffy's answer) Is applying for PhD in mechanical engineering but not intending to do research with a mechanical engineering professor viewed negatively? In my opinion, you're asking the wrong question. Don't ask how the admissions committee will view this, ask if you should even be considering doing ...


3

Write about what you know and don't speculate. Because of the power imbalance, let others (professors) speak about improvements. Think about whether you have had a good experience and whether you would recommend him to other students. Make it personal. If some sorts of students might not thrive with this prof and you wouldn't recommend they work with him ...


1

How should I approach this? Jump at the opportunity! Your professor considers your work a "gold mine" and wants to commercialise. This is an extremely rare opportunity for any student and I recommend that you seriously consider embracing the opportunity. Let me consider some of your ideas and alleviate some of your concerns: I prefer to publish it and ...


0

My PI has made it clear that it is my responsibility to transfer the ideas and technologies that I have developed over to him before the end of my PhD. That is correct. These things almost certainly belong to the university. not allowing the PhD student to graduate until the company is off its feet This is an inappropriate conflict of interest. ...


2

Like other respondents here, I recieve several emails that look similar to yours every week. I try to reply to as many as I can, but given that until yesterday I have worked 14 hour days for several weeks, some things have to go out the window. Things that make me give an application a second look: If you are a home student, all my funded PhD positions ...


2

Like user avid, I used to get several of these and they were easy to ignore. Even retired for several years, I get a few. Some ask me to join my lab (which I never had). Others are from wildly different fields. Straight to trash, or even junk. You seem to have avoided some of the pitfalls, provided that your field really is relevant to what the professor ...


3

Most of the other answers here don't really address the professor's situation. The professor may be feeling significant pressure to deliver results, especially if he does not yet have tenure. This means, in part, having students like yourself graduate and deliver good quality research. He may be in denial about the fact that your planned experiments were ...


3

There are many replies above, with excellent advice for you. However something that is missing above, I would like to add here. I was exactly in the same situation 10 years ago (Germany) - funding finished but professor was asking for more; visa was linked to studies and without funding I couldn't continue, so eventually dropped out! I can suggest you ...


0

I don't think "twisting the truth" happens often in my circles, but you should also understand that lab activities aren't cast in stone. Circumstances change every year. I have to align my activities with grants I receive, with interests of my colleagues and senior lab students, current research trends and so on. While the "core" direction remains relatively ...


2

Don't think of the other PhD student as a threat. Assuming they are intellectually as capable as you (+ you get along), they are likely to be a massive help. The point is that your PhD studies are going to be hard. They're going to be hard enough that at various points you'll run into roadblocks and have no idea what to do next. Being able to talk to someone ...


4

Having a close colleague with whom to discuss tough sticking points, potential research ideas, etc. will be INVALUABLE for you. There is nothing quite so lonely as being one of the experts of the world on a very narrow subject and never having the opportunity to discuss that subject with another person who shares your understanding. You will likely ...


0

We had two people working on the same project and almost the same research topic. They both graduated very succesful and founded a company together. Why am I saying this? Because their work formed a great friendship and not a competition. You should not see this as a threat, you should see it as a great opportunity. Of course this solely depends on your ...


4

Unfortunately, situations like this are best resolved before they reach this stage. I think your path forward, given that you're already in this situation, is to speak with, in this order, Your committee the graduate program leadership in your department your department chair the graduate program leadership in your school a university problem solver, ...


1

I strongly recommend you to talk to your advisor before you hand her/him your thesis proposal. I faced this kind of problem once. What my advisor did is she divided my thesis proposal and shared it with another research fellow.


6

I recall something like this happening with a fellow graduate student in my dept. The advisor kept wanting more. Just because the advisor wants more doesn't mean the advisor's position is reasonable. The student went to another member of the thesis committee for help, and was able to negotiate a resolution that led to graduation. My advice would be to ...


2

I think your perception of twisting the truth is correct, but I wouldn't call it lying if this is your interpretation. The twisting of the truth is more produced among professors and group leaders by students that don't know exactly what topic they are interested in exactly and should pursue for PhD work. I think you are a in a minority, burning for a exact ...


5

Projects can be broad. Research topics are narrow. I see no problems arising here as long as the advisor is responsible. A project at its inception has a lot of potential. That potential results in unanswered questions. Those questions may be closely related but distinct. They may also be individually very important and support the overall project. But at ...


20

My advice is to write your thesis up and submit it to the committee. If you are going to have an argument about whether your work is sufficient, it will go better for you if you can show that everything is written up. Maybe you still don't win. But the time is not wasted. And it is too loosey goosey to argue about "done enough" when you're not looking at ...


3

Did you never write a research plan before starting your PhD with milestones/goals you want to pursue and to which you could now refer to as being fulfilled? Or a talk you gave outlining those which was seen by your advisor and another professor. Both is pretty much mandatory at my university to not end in the situation you describe and being dependent on a ...


10

You simply aren't going to get a PhD without the signatures of your committee. And the rest of your committee will generally give a lot of weight to your advisor's opinion when they decide to sign off or not. Of course if you quit now both you and your advisor will lose out. As will the department and school because they all invested resources in you and ...


4

This is way out field but you might want to consider moving to the other professor if he will consider allowing you to defend your thesis with him... Had a friend who changed supervisors but was not easy... Will definitely get that supervisor noticed in their department though...


66

This is a really hard problem that is hard to give advice for. If the advice is bad, you will suffer, not the person giving the advice. You know the personalities better than we do. But, as an outsider, it seems like you are being abused. You are giving, but getting little in return at this point. Fighting with an advisor is seldom a wise choice. But ...


0

It's absolutely fine to ask for reference letters from both of them. Be aware that they may be somewhat redundant if you worked on the same project with both of them. So if referee A worked on project 1 with you and referee B worked on project 2, it would be much better than if both worked with you on the same project. To clarify - it is expected that you ...


0

"Dear Professor, I am sorry to have to inform you that a number of personal problems have disrupted my work programme. I am now fully engaged again on my work [if that is true] and hope to send you [say what it will be] shortly. [ I advise you against giving a specific date: hostage to fortune]. I should be happy to explain in more detail and answer any ...


2

I fully agree with xLeitix's answer in that you have nothing to be ashamed of in front of your supervisor - especially since she has already offered. On the other hand, when talking about whether this will look desperate or impact your career prospects (in academia) negatively, I'd like to offer a different perspective from Anonymus Physicist's answer. ...


4

I agree with Solar Mike, at this point formality might not be the most important concern here. I just had a big break, and recently returned to work with my supervisors, my first email to my supervisors after months of radio silence was simply "Dear professor *, hope you are well. I have recovered and am ready to resume my research, I'd like to ...


-3

My interpretation of the question: You want to pursue an academic career. You are considering taking the offered postdoctoral position in your PhD supervisor's lab. You want to know the implications of doing this for your long-term career. Doing a PhD and postdoc in the same lab does look desperate, and it is harmful to your career. I recommend ...


29

First of all, your advisor of all people really should not be somebody who you need to play games with regarding the state of your career (academic or otherwise). They really can only do their job (advising you, also in questions of career development) if you are being honest with them. In that sense, it shouldn't really matter if it "looks bad" - if your ...


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