New answers tagged

0

I would like to know if my profile fits their requirements. If I were you, I would not ask this. First of all, it's not really clear what you mean by "requirements" -- you have already indicated that you meet the published GPA and language requirements, so it's unlikely that there is anything else they could tell you. Second of all, it's not ...


2

The phrasing in your question suggests that you want an advisor with the most cachet in the field, so that your results (which you do not have yet) will have the most visibility. That would suggest waiting for the spring. If so, yes do the white paper and wait. But often what you need an advisor for is advice — that is, help and guidance doing the actual ...


-3

The proper answer to most technical questions for graduate students is "that's a good question. I don't know. Find out and tell me in our next meeting". You should say it a lot even if you do know. It helps drive home the self learning aspect of grad school while flattening the heirarchy. Always emphasize the analysis goals. What have we learned ...


5

Background (okay to skip): I myself am a PhD student and an undergrad recently started working with my advisor on a senior thesis project. My advisor is pretty much absent, and works by throwing lots of papers at someone and then leaving them to their own devices. Most of the time she can't answer my questions so I don't even try. Not because she's ...


2

Is it my responsibility as an undergrad student to figure out if my thesis is affordable? Usually, no. This is an example of where your faculty advisor should help you. Do take a few minutes to research costs before discussing it with your advisor. There might be exceptions if, based on your area of study, you were expected to know about costs already.


1

It's great that you're taking the lead and refining your ideas to come up with a well-defined research proposal. Your prospective advisors will appreciate the effort and it will likely increase the chances of them accepting you as their student. Cost is certainly an important aspect in determining the feasibility of a project. From your question, it appears ...


-3

Maybe your best approach is to contact manufacturers who would have an interest in commercialisation and see what advice and resources you can get from them


2

Yes, if you have the opportunity to visit for a few minutes in person, you should do that. Ask if there are any further steps you should immediately take. For an email reply, a few more days of waiting is better, but a quick visit is likely fine. Express your excitement about the future, etc. In these perilous time, few now have the opportunity to do this ...


5

This is pure opinion, of course, but I don't see anything wrong with getting a doctorate purely for the love of the field and a desire to know more. There are plenty of people in doctoral programs to fill the needs of academia in the future and some will be disappointed in their inability to find a suitable position. You don't need to apologize for anything. ...


4

Something is clearly wrong here. If your supervisor is not alarmed, talk to another senior person and make pretty damn sure your supervisor is correct not to be alarmed. There are many people you can ask: your thesis committee, your head of department, a trusted faculty member, someone from the School of Graduate Studies, and so on. Ask to speak in ...


6

It's normal to show unpublished work to colleagues, sometimes for their input/advice/suggestions for edits, sometimes because they're working on similar work (whether collaborating or not), or, like in this situation, to demonstrate work for a job/grad school application. I agree it's a little unusual to ask directly, but only a little, and in this situation ...


1

Meet with your advisor, put forward a proposal for finishing all outstanding works, raise authorship and explain that you feel you should be the lead author. Move-on to discuss future works. Assuming your advisor is positive, suggest timing might be an issue and ask whether an extension is possible. If not, suggest dropping some or all of the discussed ...


0

We can't determine for you if your supervisor is intentionally sabotaging you or not. But it seems clear that you relationship is irretrievably broken. You should seek a new supervisor.


4

This is a peculiar situation. Your supervisor did not honor your agreement, but at this point she has nothing to gain from continuing to be involved with your thesis, and being angry about that isn't going to help you in any way. Realistically, do not expect any more input from her, and move on. Getting someone else to look at your thesis could be useful, ...


4

I e-mailed her 4-5 times in February-March and got no reply. If she did not reply to your e-mails or otherwise advise you when she was technically your advisor, why would she reply to them now that you have graduated? I think she has effectively ended your relationship. I do not know whether she had good reason for this or if she is just lazy, but either ...


4

Going to the younger colleague is fine, but I also wouldn't hesitate to go to your advisor again. It is, after all, part of his job to train you. Prepare a detailed explanation of the problem you see with the proof and the spots where you think it is tricky. If you're conscientious in narrowing down the scope of the issue, you surely won't be wasting his ...


1

You should talk to the professor in advance. Explain your reasons. Then they will understand why you are not on their class list, miss class occasionally (don't do this too often) and don't turn in assignments. If you can ask interesting questions in class, do. There is a small chance that you will be told "no" and a small chance that there is an ...


3

It is fine. If it makes you feel better though you could clarify that the reason you're not taking it isn't just worry about the class. I have used the line in an email before "I have an amateur interest in learning the material" which I think deflects any concern about why you're not committing to doing the course 'properly'. When I said it, it ...


3

It's absolutely possible that the theorem is wrong. Even with peer-review, invalid theorems get published, especially when a plausible looking sketch is presented. Equally, it is possible that the theorem is true. Moving forwards, try to expand the proof sketch into a proof. If you get stuck, try to construct counterexamples. If you can't proceed, reach out ...


3

I would treat this like dating. You'll need to be honest and disclose red flags before you get engaged/married. But it doesn't need to come out on the first date. The reason is that so many other things might happen that would make disclosing the red flag totally unnecessary. For example, you write a professor expressing interest in working with him/her, ...


0

It is perfectly normal. Although you should talk to your advisor that your current advisor that you want to work with a different approach. And it might be helpful if you work with another advisor.


1

In general the answer to the question would be yes, and many people do so, both by staying at the same institution and by changing universities. But there are caveats. It probably isn't the norm, and there may be local traditions, say in Brazil, that suggest it is a poor idea. But you would probably already know if that were true. There are many reasons to ...


3

This is going to vary a lot by the country and customs of your university, and your relationship with your advisor. But I'd say, if you relationship with your advisor is good, then in the UK it would not be seen as out of order to refer to your supervisor as informally as you like in the acknowledgements sections of your thesis. In the theses I've read, ...


2

Generally, but this is only one person's opinion, it is better to be a bit formal in such a document. But standards can vary. Your best bet is to ask him how he would like to be acknowledged. You can specifically ask if an informal ack would be ok or not. But there are a few very prominent people who are known professionally by a nickname and it that case, a ...


1

What are the legal, ethical, and practical implications of having another job while being on a research stipend? Legally, this depends entirely on your university's policies and your contract. Ethically, there will be a wide variety of opinions: One line of thought will say that a research stipend is not a "normal" paycheck in exchange for your ...


10

About 10 years after getting my Masters in CS I came across an obscure feature on a software project I was doing on the side. It involved discrete math, which is mostly theoretical. Dr Itoga had taught this at the University of Hawaii, my alma mater. I decided to send him an email telling him that I finally had a chance to use what he had taught me, and ...


3

As you stay close to their field, it might be interesting to your professor. You could simply ask, if he wants further updates. Most PhD students leaving academia also leave their field and work on completely different topics or have other issues as those researchers face. In these case, it would be enough to talk to the advisor at alumni meetings or the ...


22

I expect there are some supervisors that would be annoyed by this, but I suspect they would be in the minority. A supervisor invests a lot into a student, and unless you left on bad terms, its most likely they'd love to hear how you are doing, I know I would.


68

I always appreciate such messages from old students. I often wonder what they are getting up to. I don't think I'm unique in that, but some would, perhaps, not be as happy with "interruptions." But you will get a sense of whether you should continue it if you do this from the response. Going back in person is also a nice thing to do if you get the ...


0

There's a body of methods in experimental design called "statistical decision theory", and it works only if one has an "external/political motivation" of the kind you describe, encoded in a loss function. Hence, with anyone who uses statistical decision theory, it should be safe to discuss the general idea of having an external/political ...


2

My concern is, if I interview with potential future advisors with this kind of story, even if the political problem I'm focused on has a long, 1-2 decades timeline for resolution, a future advisor might find this kind of attitude "disloyal" to a field or otherwise unacceptable. Importantly a PhD in a given field really is just a piece of paper ...


1

It is helpful when you want to jump into industry at some point. It is helpful as a way to network with your peers in a "professional" context It is potentially helpful for other people reading you work to get a sense of your credentials. It is completely useless for building a network of research contacts. The tricky part is that you are almost ...


6

Depending on how your lab works and how collaborative the work is, you may be right or wrong in this. However, I suggest you keep a few things in mind. Fighting with your PI is seldom a way to academic success and having the good will of your supervisor probably has more value at this moment than having a poster with a small number of authors. Also, the ...


5

In my experience (academia and industry), there is very little benefit to LinkedIn in the academic sphere. It just fails to have critical mass in academia, and therefore gets used very little. I'm sure it depends on discipline, but a combination of own/departmental webpage, preprint servers and publication aggregators, and (in some disciplines) Twitter is ...


-3

I feel you follow the wrong advisor. It seems normal for some people who are in academic. It is pretty unpleasant.


0

Some supervisors are more interested in the "new" projects, like readers are in the newspaper of today, not yesterday. Especially if they are overloaded with admin duties, they need something to take their mind off it, and it's most likely that a project that is fresh has more "refreshment value" than a project that is several years old. ...


3

Since you have already completed most of your PhD, your best course of action is to finish your PhD as soon as possible. Then you will be free of CO's bad behavior. Negotiate a plan for completion of your degree with your supervisor. Request that this plan does not rely on CO since they are not dependable. should I just accept the academic trail is dead ...


1

Having a Ph.D. supervisor who "admitted to me that she has no understanding of our project topic and what we are doing" sounds crazy to me, especially after she arranged for the three of you to write a joint paper (presumably on this project). This sounds as if you definitely need a new supervisor. You mentioned that another young prof wold be ...


-1

I would say that the overarching problem is that Co is not easy to work with and that SV doesn’t have the capability, motivation, or bandwidth to deal with it. Just because someone is a good researcher doesn’t mean they are a good manager. If, as you say in a comment, this is an extension of CO’s work, then SV also has very little leverage, other than ...


1

I've read the other answers and I don't think anyone else has mentioned the following. This is a classic case of the old proverb, "too many cooks spoil the broth". Either that or you could present it that way. You could explain that you simply find it confusing to get advice from so many sources and would prefer to limit this. Of course the risk is ...


8

I'll be the one dissenting voice and suggest you look for the silver lining. Maybe the reason the other two advisors aren't pushing her out is because they also see the value of some grist in the mill. Life is about gleaning hidden lessons. Maybe she really does have something to contribute even if in a way you don't fully appreciate right now. If her ...


37

Set a meeting with all three advisors, explain you'd like to focus entirely on the writing, and ask whether regular meetings can be replaced with less-regular meetings when you need support.


15

This sounds like a rather delicate matter. On the one hand, your request to not have your supervisory team shaken up while you are finishing your thesis is completely reasonable. On the other hand, if she was your supervisor before leaving it can be painful to come back from a long medical leave and see that your projects moved on to the extent that you aren'...


21

If she isn't a formal advisor you might just get by ignoring her. But if that doesn't seem right, I'd suggest working through one or both of your other advisors. They can quietly speak to her about the fact that her communications are disruptive and not helpful. It might be harmful for you to say the things they they can say comfortably. Let this be a ...


-4

You have less than a year to defend your thesis. You haven't published anything and need four publications before you can defend. Publishing four papers in a year is problematic: You have to write the papers, submit them, and wait for reviews. Can you manage that four times in the time you have? If so, great, go do it. Otherwise, speak to your supervisor ...


0

These 13 minutes of which you speak, was that a meeting that you planned in advance? Or did you happen to meet him at a random moment? If it was a planned meeting, you should insist on another planned meeting of at least an hour to discuss this point and only this point. If it was a random moment, your supervisor might already be late for another urgent ...


-1

His PhD student assigned me the project, so I haven't spoken to my actual supervisor all summer. Should I a. go ahead with the project and send him my final work when I come up with a viable solution and potentially the abstract for the paper b. email him and ask him if I can move forward with this approach In terms of pecking order I would at least make ...


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