New answers tagged

0

The advice of UJM is good, especially the first paragraph. But, there might be an option to help you move. I left one program for another, but for different reasons. But I was successful in moving primarily because there was another faculty member who supported me in ways that my advisor did not. He expressed confidence in my ability and it was his ...


1

If there's a particular professor you'd like to work with, my suggestion is to read the most recent several papers from the laboratory. Then when you write the professor just say that you're very interested in their research direction. You've read their recent papers on X and Y and were particularly interested in some particular point that one of those ...


2

In my experience (North American research-intensive universities) and point of view, this is a good question without a hard-and-fast answer. having a specific research topic in mind is good in that it indicates that you've made an effort to think about the topic. However: new researchers (undergraduates) often have very unrealistic ideas about what ...


3

The first order of business is making sure that you cannot graduate. If you have more than 10 papers published in non-predatory journals, you are objectively ready to wrap it up. I would suggest contacting former PhD students of your advisor to know how they "escaped". Assuming you will not be able to graduate, look at your exit options. Your ...


0

It depends on your current relationship and on who you & your advisor are as a person in general. If your current relationship runs smoothly and your research interests continue to coincide you may continue to publish joint papers. I have seen that happening long after a former PhD student graduates - even after they get faculty positions. However I have ...


5

I very much doubt any of them "forget" in the sense of "Who are you, and how did you get this number?" The relationship one has with their former advisor will depend on both the advisor, the graduate, and their relationship - and it will evolve over time. Some are happy to go their separate ways, some continue to be long time ...


1

Communicate more directly with your advisor about your expectations: state that you are concerned about your writing and would prefer more feedback on it, and be specific. Are you concerned about organization? Word choice? Grammar? If your advisor isn't a native English speaker, they may not be the best person to give you feedback on some of these; they may ...


4

Unpopular opinion: be happy that your dataset was used for, not one, but two publications! You'll get your paper out, then at some point you may write "This dataset was used in the following publications \cite{otherstudent1, otherstudent2}." So that people will know that your contribution was important. That's kind of counterintuitive because you ...


2

Should I conclude that I am not capable enough to do PhD with the words of my advisor? or Should I give myself another chance? No you shouldn't conclude that you are incapable of doing a PhD. Whether or not you should give yourself another chance depends entirely on you. We can help you with identifying the salient points that should play a role in that ...


3

Though I can't relate to your situation, I have friends who were in a similar situation during their Ph.D. They were mentally abused and constantly demeaned by their advisors. Though this behaviour is predominant in South Asian universities. But it's quite prevalent in many western universities too. However, all my friends who went through such hard times, ...


8

It should be considered positively if the dataset is used by completely somebody else. I remember that number of acknowledgments can be used as a metric in some grant application or other types of report. If you prefer citation or authorship, then I'd recommend to make your dataset citable as soon as possible, e.g. as your own publication, article or as pure ...


24

I don't see anything problematic here, unless the papers that your advisor wrote with the other students take credit for developing the dataset (which would be a clear ethical violation). Many papers in computer science use one or several datasets developed by other authors, and it's not a standard practice that the dataset developers are invited to ...


16

Fighting with your supervisor is probably going to negatively affect your own career. Don't let your future hang on this one thing whether it is fair or not. Forcing punishment on the advisor will not get you the letters and recommendations you need to get out and on your own. Get your own paper published. "Make nice" enough that you get good ...


2

Many conference organizers are well aware of how "organized" some advisors / faculty / university accounting departments are. Contact them and if you can provide evidence that it will "eventually" be paid then they will usually accept that.


1

You already gave a good summary with the three questions at the very end. If you are very interested in the topic, already know a lot about it and can work on your own without much help, then go for it. If I were you, I would sit down and try to figure out a topic for your thesis. If you have the impression that you have a reasonable idea then ask the ...


13

If you don't get a letter from your advisor, and I certainly see why you'd feel uncomfortable doing so, the best thing to do would be to ask one of your other letter writers to address why you don't have a letter from your advisor. In practice, this may be tricky because it only works if you know that one of your letter writers knows about the problem with ...


25

While there is always risk in such things, if his professional credentials are good and the other comments don't reflect badly on that, I'd suggest asking for the recommendation and not otherwise mentioning it in cover letters and such. Treat it as a purely professional relationship, which it should be. As you note it is odd to not have a recommendation from ...


2

You can reasonably guess that your research when you join the group will be closely related to the research the group has published in the past 1-5 years. Therefore, the biggest leg-up you can get is to go through their recent publications (ask for them from the professor if you don't have access to the journals from home or your current school's network) ...


6

Just reply with the facts: Explain that your supervisor was offered coauthorship, but has chosen not to be a coauthor of the paper. (If you feel you want to elabore why - e.g. since he felt he did not contribute sufficiently to the paper, or the like - feel free to do so.) Especially if this is listed under minor comments, take it as such. In any case, it ...


2

This is half of an answer. Has anybody ever heard of anything similar? Yes. Conflicts like this unfortunately is not uncommon, judging from what I have observed in only two universities. Indeed, it appears to be more and more common. Is there an appeal process that I could take, if I am not allowed to graduate? Formal appeal process? Yes. The process ...


1

This seems to be an administrator level problem. Escalate it through the administration as necessary. And get your advisor to argue on your behalf. It seems odd that someone would disapprove a course that the advisor approves. But there is probably a better advocate for the visa problem. If they aren't doing their job, escalation is warranted, and perhaps ...


0

It very much depends on two factors: your relationship with your advisors how influential they are in the area of your interest And then it depends on other factors like: How comfortable are they with recommending people aggressively How does your actual skill-set and experience look like Have you worked with the prospective company / department of your ...


2

My advisors wrote generic recommendation letters and uploaded them to Interfolio, and that was pretty much it. That said, my relationship with them was very transactional and so I never felt comfortable asking for anything other than recommendation letters. Personally, I think advisors should help with the job hunt, and should take the initiative to offer ...


4

Some universities specifically tell supervisors that helping students find a job is not part of the supervisor's responsibility. Most supervisors will give advice. Some may provide more help than that. Is it true that graduates often get positions just by having their advisor make a "phone call"? This would be extremely rare. Some might ...


12

I think it's reasonable to expect a PhD advisor to make introductions but not to place you into jobs. They should help introduce you to people at conferences, both directly 1 to 1 or by supporting you in getting opportunities to present. They should introduce you to visiting professors when they come to tour your space/give a talk to your department. They ...


3

Your original phrasing would be interpreted incorrectly, as if you were the professor wanting to help a student. A note would be good, expressing thanks. You can also say that you would love to have the opportunity to work with them at some point in the future. But don't suggest, or even hint, at joint supervision at this point. After you are in the new ...


1

Unfortunately, I think the correct way to do this would have been to have a conversation with both PIs (both individually and then together) about your preference in switching. If there was agreement, you could settle together on a way to transition. You could still try this approach but I think it's a bit late. There are many many other questions here ...


3

I agree with the other answer that from a reputation/career angle, there seems nothing wrong with doing a Ph.D. in 2 years, especially if your recommendations and publication record is strong. I don't see why your degree should be perceived negatively as a result. (Perhaps there is something specific to your field - I am also in STEM and would definitely not ...


1

The formalities of admission depend from geography to geography, and institution to institution. However, it is most emphatically up to you to take the initiative to indicate interest and spur exploration of whether this would make sense. I would have thought it entitled, arrogant, and forward as a faculty member to indicate to a student, even a close ...


2

A contrarian view: in my opinion, every author is responsible for listing their own affiliations. If they do something unethical, as here, or some other wrong thing, e.g., forgetting to list one of their current legitimate affiliations, then I fail to see why the other authors would somehow held accountable. Indeed, sometimes a researcher can very ...


1

Just ask. There is nothing to lose. Many of us would be hesitant to ask a student, realizing that there are advantages to moving on and coming in contact with different faculty and their ideas. He might even suggest that you move on, actually, and don't take that as a negative. If that happens, ask for his advice on your next steps. And try to keep in ...


7

Your advisors telling you that you've done enough to finish your PhD in two years is a good thing. The fact that you have extensions to do on it in future work is also a good thing. I've also never heard of a department that would think finishing a PhD in two years is a problem. I suspect it's most likely a neutral thing, but if not it's almost certainly ...


6

I think the actual issue here, based on your various comments, is that you don't employ the conventional language of commitment the way that everyone else does. That is leading to a miscommunication because you aren't actually speaking colloquial English (I'm assuming the language you and the professor are using is English), but are using your own, ...


14

When I take on a PhD student, I am investing $10,000s of MY resources, as well as 100s of hours (or 1000s somethimes) of MY time into that indevidual. Not only that, but they probably have a studentship or scholarship of some sort that specifies at least what the general topic of their research will be. What do I expect in return for this? I expect the ...


5

This: he expects PhD students to be committed to PhD completion above all else, regardless of subject interest or circumstances on the part of the student. is not the same as: he wanted someone who would 100% be his yes-man. Commitment and obedience are different things. Also, there's the question of whether what you finish your Ph.D. with is ...


4

It's a bit like the old legends where someone says "Only the pure of heart can enter the castle". You either think "Yes, I'm pure of heart, I'm going to enter the castle", or you think "Oooh, sounds dangerous: I think I'll give it a miss." If your professor exaggerates the commitment required, and you still say "yes, I'll do it!", then he knows he'll have ...


7

As often happens in these situations, I'd suspect that a substantial part of the tension is misunderstanding about the meanings of the "expectations". (That there'd be misunderstandings is not surprising, considering that the prof and the student are in very different places in their experiences and their lives, and almost surely attach significantly ...


30

My personal assessment is that the professor is correct. A good PhD student in my opinion is someone who is committed fully to the completion of the thesis, and spends 100% of working hours (and let's face it, even much beyond that) on it. There is no way around it, if one wishes to be a good academic. Also: "expects PhD students to be committed to PhD ...


1

Its never too late to switch labs/advisors if your current trajectory isn't going towards where you want to see yourself in the future. Every advisor has their own way to guide students, be it "Hands-on" or "Hands-off". From my experience, I believe early career researchers who are just tenured or people who are in the process of putting together their ...


1

At some universities, all PhD students have multiple advisors. In principle, this means that if one advisor is not doing their job, other advisors will fill in the gaps. This is not exactly accountability, but it gets close. At some universities, all PhD advisors are required to meet certain standards. In principle, if they fall below those standards, ...


-4

It's unclear to me what you're hoping to achieve. I understand that you're hoping to incite change across all departments, but on the one hand you're saying that your professor's behavior was abusive, and on the other you're saying that you don't want to complain. Speaking from experience, if you write to the dept. chair, especially if you mention your ...


2

Rules vary, but visiting professors should not be permitted to supervise PhD students because they are not employed for the duration of the supervision period. So while they might be skilled supervisors, they are not suitable supervisors.


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