New answers tagged

3

We do not know your local laws and culture, so beware that advice here may be inaccurate. He makes micro-bullying or threatening statements occasionally, but this public humiliation seemed very serious and crossed a red line. It is the pattern of behavior, not the specific example you gave, that is what you need to report. A recording is not necessary to ...


3

This should definitely be reported and, as it seems nobody has done it yet, the ethical choice for you would be to do so. Of course, it would have been much easier to gather evidence if the incident was reported at the time when it happens instead of a year later. However, as Joel pointed out in a comment, there are several witnesses and (by a simple ...


0

Does working in a research group with poor funding means poor future prospects post graduation? All the past members of my group were Chinese and they have got academic positions in China and few are pursuing postdoc. I think many wanted to stay in Canada and enter into industry but couldn't due to poor contacts of my advisor. I think the second statement ...


1

There is probably a decent correlation, yes. And it shows a lack of shrewdness not to have noted this (let alone ALL the other issues with tentative funding, aside from job prospects.) However, you are 4 years into this thing. Get the piled higher and deeper. Move on, make new choices. Watch your six. Read the Robert Frost poem. (It's not about just ...


4

This is hard to judge without knowing a lot more about why there is a lack of funding. It might be a local problem, in which case you might be fine. But if the funders generally don't value this field or even this line of inquiry within it then you could wind up in trouble. In that case, you need to be prepared to be flexible in the lines of inquiry that you ...


18

Yes, it is completely wrong to use ˚ as a degree sign. The reason is that ˚ is U+02DA: RING ABOVE. It is not at all a degree sign; instead, it is (semantically) the ring above the A in Å. The correct character is °, U+00B0: DEGREE SIGN. This is almost the first time I have seen someone misuse U+02DA: RING ABOVE as the degree sign. However, it is very common ...


1

Since you clarified that the "official topic" is research and career progression, I would just let it come up naturally. After you have clarified your general interest in the topic and in doing a PhD., there is an ideal spot for something like: "But of course, before I can do that, I need to finish my master's here by writing a thesis. I ...


26

As you (presumably) continue down the academic career path, you will be buffeted by all sorts of "helpful suggestions" that span the range from ignorable noise to microbullying by those in positions of authority over you. Editors wanting picky little formatting edits, some good some bad. Reviewers with weird comments. Granting agencies and ...


27

For the International System of Units, the units of measurements are defined by the SI brochure. For the degree, unit of plane angle, and the degree Celsius, unit of Celsius temperature, the SI brochure at p. 133 and at p. 149 uses a circle and not a zero. However, at table 8, the circle is rendered with an "o" (probably they didn't have the circle ...


9

There's a single Unicode character "℃" which could save you having to think about all this.


0

As a PhD student, I had this problem - the solution turned out to be to call the paper authors for help. One group just sent me their code, which was nice. Another clarified some bits I was doing wrong. I think I remember that one had a typo in the paper, but that might be wishful memory. However, I would also say I came up in an enviroment where my ...


3

Yes, you should ask for help Assuming you are more-or-less proficient in coding, it is possible (even likely) that the problem is with the paper itself. In that case you will definitely need your supervisor to help figure this out. This is part of the reason why I constantly disagree with people saying "post the source" for academic papers. There's ...


14

The question is sufficiently vague that I'm not sure why everyone is assuming that your advisor has set you with a goal to implement something from a paper and no one else can touch it because it's a learning experience for you. Of course you can ask for help from your group - that's why we work in groups. You should definitely ask your advisor who could ...


32

I'd like to add to Buffy's answer and some of the comments: It does happen that the difficulty is in the paper rather than the one sitting before it. I've had a situation where our Master student couldn't figure out how to get an algorithm from a paper working. Neither could I. We decided that they should go on and use a different approach. I later on met ...


22

Yes you can ask, but whoever you ask, make sure you check with your advisor first so that you understand the requirements. The answer might be "do it yourself" of course. But more likely is that, while they leave the task to you, they might point you to some resource that will help you do it. One principle that is important in teaching is to give ...


-1

This might be simplified but I hope it's useful. You can think of the research process as consisting of 4 steps. Step 1. Setting your topic Here you will define your topic, understand the research landscape (the tops and valleys, the things that are important and those ideas that have been discarded). A key activity here includes formulating your research ...


2

Mark already talked to the department chair and the graduate chair (though he might be called differently). He needs to continue this conversation urgently. He should also invite them to solve the problem instead of asking them to support his solution (even if in the end, they amount to the same). I would advise to ask the chair to find a new advisor, which ...


2

It is not in my competency to decide what should be in the Data Transfer Document. It is created solely by your advisor. If the advisor solely invented a document for you to sign then really you should not sign it and wait for an official document to come in (I heavily doubt it will come someday).


1

If there is someone you are on speaking terms with (dept head? grad chair? student rep? union?) you could explain your concern about signing up for more work though you do not object to handing over existing data as is.


3

You have a say in the wording of the doc. In my experience, there is a bit of back and forth about what these docs say pursuant of a signature. I'm with most of the people above, I'm not sure walking away from 4.5 years of work when you are trying to build a future is sound but only you know the circumstances. Short of hiring a lawyer, I'd simply go through ...


4

You wrote:"My fund comes from a different department completely unrelated to my former PhD adviser." When you accepted this funding, you probably signed a document with a lot of fine print. Check this fine print. I wouldnt be surprised if all your code and IP might actually belong to them already. It is rare that you receive funding from a ...


18

First off: You can't be forced to do anything in any situation where you are walking away (*). This implies that when you are asked to sign a document, you can decline. You can also decide to sign it, but you should ask yourself (and the other party) what's in it for you if you do. It's a negotiation, and that means both sides should strive to get something ...


5

I would try to get out of it without signing anything. It doesn't matter if you don't expect to use what you did in the foreseeable future. Basically, when you enrolled in this PhD, everything you did was covered by some existing rules to which you agreed explicitly or implicitly when you entered the PhD program. Asking you to sign something now doesn't seem ...


6

You are being asked to sign a legal document. You should seek legal advice from a lawyer, if you really are interested in protecting your own self-interest. Even with regard to IP, your name should still appear on any resulting copyrights or patents, as the producer of the IP. You should not sign a document you are not comfortable with. You should certainly ...


2

I'm just repeating here what others have said already, mostly, but I will add it again to be sure. Don't sign anything. Not that the legal implications are terribly important anyway; but it will be an important psychological step to snap out of the strange state of mind you are in. You are not a serf beholden to some job you worked at for a few years. You ...


5

What's going to happen if you don't sign? If nothing much, then refer them back to the University's policy document on IP. I'm wondering why they need this. If it's not already covered by agreement then just say no. Either they own the IP and rights or they don't. If they don't then why do they think they have the right to demand it? Why assign to a ...


7

Don’t sign At least until you have had some proper advice. I haven’t seen the document and IANAL but there is a difference between what the University or PI might assert is its IP and what actually is. This matters because you say you still want to get a PhD and the work you have done in the last 4.5 years might be useful to you in that. You wouldn’t be the ...


4

Your immediate question concerns whether to sign a Data Transfer Document and/or to add a clause or substitute a different document. My advice is to take a step back and sleep on the paperwork and if possible show everything to a good friend who is COMPLETELY UNINVOLVED. Get some outside perspective and bear in mind what YOUR best interest is. Earlier ...


6

This seems rather unfair to you, but let’s put that aside. It seems like the crux of the issue may be whether the word complete means “finished” or “total.” If I were to ask you to give over the “complete” data for a project, is that the finished data or all the data you have? I am not a lawyer, but to the best of my knowledge the way to deal with this ...


77

Do not sign any document you are not sure about. Do not sign a document that assigns property to someone else unless you are getting fairly paid for it. Your PhD advisor cannot force you to do anything unless you have agreed contractually to do it. Very probably the work you did as a PhD student belongs to your university, and not to yourself or your ...


25

If you sign a document in which you promise to complete unfinished projects, it will become much harder for you to refuse a request to do that, since you will be refusing to do something that you promised to do. Now, whether what you signed constitutes a legally enforceable contract or not may be debatable, and may depend on whether you are receiving ...


2

Ideally, he (either S or A or both) should be included if and only if their intellectual contributions appear in the paper. If they have contributed that, then they should be an author, just as is true for any other person. Unfortunately, the world isn't ideal and in some fields it is just "pretty standard" to include an advisor even if they have ...


1

This advisor's "negligence" is an act of academic bullying. There is a few things one can do to counter academic bullying, but one has to think them thoroughly well in advance. I'm not writing them here, by now, since some advisors could read them to neutralize counter-bullying. Maybe you can get some advice from a union representative or someone ...


1

I agree with the other posts, but to directly answer your question about the value of the offer. Unless you want to get a Ph.D. in math, the value of the offer is zero. If you are interested in doing that you should definitely explore other options. At a minimum, it will help you better understand the plus and minuses of the program at that institution and ...


2

In principle you can use Markdown on Overleaf (tl;dr; with a few "wrapper" lines in LaTeX at the beginning and end, the body of the document can be in Markdown format), but the RMarkdown layer would be an extra challenge (that is, if you actually have R code embedded in your document). There is an interesting possibility here but it's unstable (I ...


1

For collaborative writing in Markdown, you could use Manubot. I don't think there is a good versioning system (which would be indispensable for efficient collaborations) with RMarkdown as of now.


-1

I agree with your methods. I know other techniques: Check the publication list of the advisor. More than 20 publications per year as last author means that the advisor prioritizes quantity over quality and has no time to be hands-on. Check the website Labvisor to see if there are any reviews from your potential lab. Take a look at the advisor's office. If ...


7

Just ask their graduate students. There’s no reason people won’t be frank about this question, hands-off advisors don’t think being hands-off is a bad thing and vice-versa.


2

I would suggest looking at the PhD thesis of former students of the advisor, especially at the thank you/ acknowledgement part. All of them will thank their advisor (no information there) and most of them will thank their parents (also not useful for you) but usually there will be a whole paragraph or two about the advsior where the students explain why ...


1

Ask your supervisor what steps need to occur to get the paper published. Request that a timeframe be established for each step. Clearly state how much time you are able to contribute to the project (total and within the next month). This is not a hostage situation. This is an all-too-common disorganisation or negligence situation. It can be hard to tell ...


-2

authors I would like to submit a review article, titled " xxxx " Please find the attached documents and send me your valuable comments within next week. Sincerely,


6

If you really don't care about the paper then A seems ok as long as the paper isn't published without you. But you could nudge the professor and then decide what you want to do. If you get unreasonable demands then you can back away which should prevent the paper being published (ethically, at least). But it is possible that your worst fears won't be ...


1

If s/he had any substantial input on the work, s/he should be on the paper. You say that s/he is the corresponding author but there is no reason that a student cannot be a corresponding author, and no reason why a supervisor would be happy not to be on it (for their own reasons) while simultaneously happy for you to proceed. But you cannot submit a paper ...


0

You could write to the editor and demand a retraction. You may get what you want but it may drag on for a long time and be a real drain on your emotional reserves. And all this for a paper that may not garner a lot of attention anyway. I am basing myself on the general statistics here, not disparaging your work! If you think the paper is the rare one that ...


1

Since your question included the word "lab" the answer is that the supervisor will be on it, regardless of contribution. The best justification for this is that labs are expensive, and the supervisor's main job is to keep it running, and they need all the kudos they can get. Labs that go broke are in no position to attract students, so you could ...


1

Do I stand a chance in publishing it without his name? Yes, you very much do. Your supervisor may genuinely wish not to be associated with the main idea in the paper, for their own good reasons, and if they are a decent sort (not a given in academia) they will let you proceed as long as their name is not on it, and also not try to stab you in the back later. ...


0

I am afraid that the reviewer was right. Be aware that direct quotes (which, yes, must have the quotation marks or the indented separate paragraph) of more than a dozen words are rarely if ever necessary. You should have paraphrased. Now as for your old mentor. S/He may be upset, but since you were just an undergrad, s/he should have caught the plagiarism ...


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