New answers tagged

1

Is it too early to switch advisors? If there is evidence the advisor is not the right person for you, it's never too early. It's clear from your question that you should switch. Is it too late to switch advisors? It depends on the rules of your university, but in the first semester it is probably not too late. Don't wait until it's too late.


2

Just say it like you have here. Thanks, I'm seeking funding, I'll need some time. The professor understands that time is needed. It would be good, however, that you say you will let him know as soon as you have more information, but in, say, three months in any case. If you want to do more, ask him to point you to any papers that you might study during ...


3

From your description, I'd say it's not time to worry yet: Meanings convey poorly via words. See e.g. this "joke" that turned out to grievously hurt someone. You can't be sure your former classmate doesn't welcome you ... yet. It's possible you're asking your former classmate the wrong things. For example you're asking about paperwork. Why should he know ...


2

I'd suggest you make an appointment with your director or studies or ombudsman (or whoever else is in charge). You should explain the problem to them in an honest way like you did in this question, and ask them what are your options and what they recommend. At the very least you need to inform them that there are some issues with your supervisor, so that ...


2

However, come time for the actual conference, my advisor had switched projects on me, and what I presented was nothing at all related to the session of that day. changed her mind when I went out and actually got an offer she will take my inquiries as a personal attack The past few years feel like a textbook definition of Gaslighting Your ...


1

That really sucks. I had a messy situation during my MSc which took me over 3 years, in part due to supervisors being flimsy and in part due to me losing my own motivation. There was also a project which changed direction halfway through, into the exact opposite of what I wanted. I had told them ahead of time, that the one thing I refused to do was work ...


0

Normal ? regrettably I would consider this semi normal. A good situation ? absolutely not. Is the situation likely to get any better? from your description definitely not. As you say that you only started 1.5 years ago, and you are in a bad situation, change groups, and if that isn't possible leave or change university.


1

The desirability of such a situation varies from person to person. Some people, but I doubt many, would love the independence. But others (most?) need more guidance, especially at the start and possibly near the end. But if you need more guidance then you need to find a way to get it. A co-advisor? A different advisor? Something. But just going along as ...


0

I agree with MPIchael but want to present it from a somewhat different angle. You're feeling embarrassed that you don't know how to do something, that your supervisor previously taught you. This isn't needed. Science isn't easy. If it was, anyone could do it and we wouldn't need to go to university to learn. Consider it a matter of professionalism. ...


0

Your supervisor is there to guide and mentor you during this process. As long as you have done your due diligence and can show the avenues you have tried and why those avenues didn't work, your supervisor will most likely be perfectly happy to help you with what your next step might be to solve the problem. I work in a research environment, have supervised ...


3

I have been working for 3 days...but I am not even close Research takes time, three days isn't very long. (Albeit, I'm unfamiliar with the specifics.) I am trying to use the same code as we did in class, but my model is quite a bit different than the class examples so I can't figure it out. Ask your peers, a teaching assistant, whoever taught the class,...


6

The way to frame your question can have a huge impact. If you did your due diligence and researched some material on this (books, lectures, papers, StackExchange!), and are still stuck, then there is a chance that your questions are more than valid. If you start your email or personal question by: "I have tried three ways to do this.." and then show/tell ...


4

I did a quick search on this and I could find a document that suggests this: At any given point of time, the maximum number of Ph.D. students allowed should not exceed 8 students for a recognized Professor, 6 students for a recognized Associated Professor and 4 students for a recognized Assistant Professor. Read point number 4 on page 2 of the ...


0

Two one-week vacations during a calendar year is completely reasonable. That said, it's possible you work for an advisor who would find this lazy. In my opinion, that makes them an insensitive jerk, but my opinion won't help you graduate no matter how many times you link to this post. I really don't think this is something you should need to "explain" to a ...


3

I'll guess you have done about all you can other than send a final notice very close to the deadline. The prof is probably targeting that "drop dead" date and continuous reminders may just get in the way. But a note on the next to last day would be good. You might also start to think about other options. Who else might be able to do this for you?


-1

Your supervisor has acted with hipocrisy, has no interpersonal skills and should resign himself right away to supervise you. This might be just a supervisor's strategy to avoid problems in their publication goals and an attempt of gaslighting you and the department managers. Take your work with you (if any), estimate whether you should ask for a supervisor ...


0

I think the only conclusion that you can draw from the situation is that the PI perceived something that made her feel like she didn't want to commit to a multi-year relationship with you. I don't think it does you much good to wonder if she really has the resources for more than one student or not. There are some hints in some of the comments you've made ...


2

My supervisor seemed understanding, telling me I was 'one of the strongest students' he'd taught, and not to worry as sometimes life gets in the way, and I should take a study break if necessary. Taking a break seems a great idea, I think your supervisor said good things here. I therefore took a year off, and came off the medication. It is great to know ...


4

If you are in good terms with your PI and you have weekly meetings with her, it is probably best if you bring up the topic in your next meeting. If "lab politics" are really involved (which need not be the case), it is unlikely that she will provide more information through email. If she had told you that she would have funding and space for you all, it is ...


3

Assuming what you said is entirely true. Some key points to think about are: 1) Did you suffer from depression prior to being admitted to the PhD program? If yes, you should consider this as your mis-judgement of the suitability of the PhD program to you at the beginning. Learn from it. 2) Were you paid by stipend during the break? If yes, I would say your ...


-2

Thanks for the very interesting question. Here is my two cents. 1) I fully agree with Erwan that " your supervisor owes you at least a clear explanation, if only for you to make an informed decision about what to do next." 2) Getting a PhD is supposed to be tough and rightly so. Advising PhD students is hard work. One of a supervisor's tasks is to help you,...


-2

Most depressions during a PhD stem from an unreasonable supervisor that puts people in uncomfortable if not threatening situations of pressure. There is almost no checks and balances in academia and a PhD ultimately depends solely on the opinion of your supervisor. Considering the reply of your supervisor, you should rethink twice if you want to work with ...


8

In my opinion your confusion is understandable, your supervisor owes you at least a clear explanation, if only for you to make an informed decision about what to do next. If for some reason your supervisor doesn't give you this explanation, I'd suggest you try to discuss this with somebody else who can give you a reasonably objective evaluation: maybe there ...


17

It is hard to know how to advise you in particular because there are many aspects of the situation that are not covered in your posting. However, here are some ideas that may be helpful. You should not do this by email. Email is not a good medium for important discussions such as this. You should request an in-person meeting with your advisor. Before you go ...


9

This is a big area to cover in "an answer" which will be more like 5 questions to begin of a conversation :) but you've done the right thing in asking for opinions. Firstly I'd say I disagree with most of the answers. If your advisor is suggesting that you quit, it is likely that you will have a hard time carrying on with the same advisor. Maybe, but ...


67

I would like to add my perspective as a supervisor having a PhD student suffering from a depression. She has been absent for about two years now and not yet returned. Neither me nor she herself have anticipated that it would take so long. The year might have been a surprise for your supervisor, too. I have been supportive over all this time and will keep ...


76

If your advisor is suggesting that you quit, it is likely that you will have a hard time carrying on with the same advisor. You maybe need to have a discussion with them about why your performance was bad, and why you needed a break. As it currently stands, it sounds like you had one year in the program without any progress, and then another year where you ...


5

You should really reflect on it, and probably talk to your physician or other professional about it. If the PhD, although it is your dream, was causing your suffering you might be better off not returning to it. Now, if you actually want to keep going, you might try to convince your advisor, if that does not work, it does not mean that you have to quit the ...


5

I also feel terrible every day about what I said to the Head of Department. They were the best teacher I’d ever had and they are also one of the foremost scholars in my current field. I think what you said to the Head of Department should have been expected and I think you should have been better supported. ‪My question is whether I should try to reach ...


6

Yes, your advisor behaviour is unprofessional and certainly against the ethical policies of virtually any serious publisher. I'd contact the other coauthor and write a joint email along the following lines (modify according to your knowledge of the situation): Dear X, We are disappointed by your refusal to share the final versions of the ...


4

Unless you are willing to make a formal complaint through the university or the journal, there is probably little you can do. But don't work with this person in the future. That should be obvious. If you are already clear of his influence and ability to sabotage you, then a formal complaint might be worth doing, but more for the benefit of future ...


0

If you can’t reproduce the results at all, I’d back off. Don’t put your name on something you don’t trust. But feature extraction techniques, SEM, CFA etc are well known to be tenuous and very sensitive to the data. Any informed reader will (should?) already appreciate that.


4

Removing the advisor's name from the paper does not fix the underlying issue preventing you from submitting to journal X, which is the prevention of conflicts of interest. By removing your advisor from the author list and submitting to X, she wouldn't have to make an editorial decision about her own paper, but will now have to make that decision about her ...


7

This is not about the relationships with the former advisor at all. The list of authors is supposed to be determined based on who actually worked on the particular research (which sometimes – however good or bad it is – may mean simply being a supervisor and providing funding). If the researcher contributed to several of the formulation of hypothesis data ...


0

As an adult, and a professional, contact them and discuss how you feel about this and why it is important to you. Should they have informed you... maybe, but you didnt really ask and maybe they didnt expect you to publish in X or want to. Your advisor seems to believe in you and work well with you, I cant imagine an adult conversation discussing your ...


1

The other answers give proper solutions to the questions the OP asks. Here is a suggestion to avoid the problem altogether. Publish the full paper on arXiv, or as a technical report from your own university. Then publish an abbreviated version in the journal, and make crossreferences. Before you do this, carefully doublecheck the journal's policies on ...


0

Having published a few things with Elsevier journals I can tell you that you often need to suggest reviewers. Your supervisor is the big cheese, so he gets put on that list. Don't be upset about the authorship, some journals make you describe contributions to stop this, but it is very common practice, and there are comics about how much work different ...


2

Others have given good advice regarding how you should respond to the review. But to add a little regarding your concerns: I don’t understand why the journal contacted him and not me to review that paper though I was the corresponding author? I feel very bad that even though it was my work the journals did not send me the paper for review. What do ...


-1

TL;DR: Doing the review for your supervisor is as mandatory as making him an author of your paper. For the editor, it practically matters only that your supervisor commands the expertise required for the review. This is kind of circular, but let’s start here: My advisor had almost no contribution in the paper, but since it is mandatory to put the advisor’...


3

I would suggest to review the paper, it's a very good experience. Tell your supervisor to warn the journal editor that he refused to review the paper and you will do the work.


37

One way to resolve this would be that your advisor refused to review the manuscript and suggests you as a possible reviewer. Then the editor can decide what to do. Do not overthink why your advisor was chosen first. He has been around for a longer time and is therefore more known to editors. I would prefer this procedure to a simple 'yes' to the request (...


5

Normally the answer to such requests is yes. It is good experience. But the review may wind up being in the name of the advisor. He was contacted as a more senior academic, I think, and the editor didn't know of his lack of specific knowledge. However, since the work is related to your own, it might be worth letting the editor know, directly or, preferably,...


0

It unfortunately sometimes happens that a professor or other PI may see a result from a student that they want to be true, but then a more junior student fails to reproduce the result, and the professor trusts the more senior student. If you have time and it is not too stressful for you, writing the paper can be good practice, and may help you communicate ...


1

You have two options. First option: decline to be the author of the paper, second option: write and submit the paper as first author. In the second case, the paper will go under review and the reviewers and the editors will decide if it is a good publishable result. Personally I would choose the second option in a high-medium ranking journal. In this way, if ...


0

You can convince your professor with more tangible datas. However, you have to master the statistical calculating methods for this and have to find the quality articles which reflect well the false one.


1

Check this out: Nobody in theoretical computer science cares where you got your degree. Really. We. Do. Not. Care. We only care about the quality and visibility of your results. Publish strong papers and give brilliant talks at top conferences. Convince well-known active researchers to write letters raving about your work. Make a good product and get ...


11

Your career depends much more on what you do than on the university you attend. Even for doctoral study. It is true that getting the first job may be easier for those from internationally known research universities, but once you have a position, you also have opportunities, just as does your current advisor. Also, consider that some students at those top ...


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