New answers tagged

3

I will never remove my IMO medal from my CV, and that is a high school award. Even if you are extremely successful later in your academic career, you probably want to keep awards for the signaling to prospective PhD students, if you think the award correlates positively with academic ability. If you think the award in question is unrelated to your academic ...


4

You did the research at the institution you attended, so that's what you should list on your CV. It's not typical to put contact information for a professor on your CV, but if you'd like to make sure they are easy to find you can certainly add a note. I'd do something like: Undergraduate Researcher, Dr. I. Newton lab (now at Apple University)


4

All that I really can say is what will not describe "creation of exams". In some versions of English, "writing an exam" would mean "taking the exam" in other English. That is, being an examinee, rather than an examiner. "Setting an exam" in some contexts is understood as "creating the exam", but seldom in the ...


-1

A common model used for creating instructional materials is the ADDIE model. Its five phases are: Analyze – Gather information about one's audience, the tasks to be completed, how the learners will view the content, and the project's overall goals. Design – Write a learning objective, identify and break down tasks to be more manageable for the designer, ...


5

I am handling PhD admissions for CS at a British university. None[1] of the information you mention in your post seems relevant for a PhD application to me. There is no need to say anything at all about how exactly you spend your January. Similarly, preferences for interview dates should given in a far more generic way. For example, "I am unavailable on ...


3

As the answer of user2768 has stated, doing research which leads to an accepted abstract at a conference is a good accomplishment for an undergraduate. Congratulations. Doubly so since -- for whatever combination of reasons -- you don't seem to have extensive support from your more senior advisor(s). If you find the funds to attend the conference and present ...


21

Submitting work to a conference, having that work accepted, and presenting that work at the conference has value, such accomplishments should appear on CVs. Withdrawing an accepted work from a conference due to no funding shows lack of foresight, perhaps even disrespect (by wasting time), and likely shouldn't appear on CVs. Seek other funding sources, e.g., ...


-1

I doubt that anyone outside your field can give you an accurate assessment of your CV and your progress. Your advisor seems satisfied, but you can seek the advice of other professors and/or industry professionals. Just ask for a quick review and if there are any glaring omissions. But you should also explore Imposter Syndrome for which I see a bit of ...


1

(This answer will not lead to detailed advice, but it will give you more objective feedback than any single mentor, coach or counselor can offer:) Write job applications for tenure-track jobs. If you get invitations, you're doing fine, if not, you need to step up your game.


-1

There must be some counseling service at your university. Many students struggle with that kind of self-perception problems. I say self-perception because, as you mentioned yourself, other accomplished people around you are satisfied with your work. So maybe just reach out to someone who is psychiatrically trained and has experience with these kinds of ...


2

Your university might have a career services office that can help. Otherwise, hire a private career coach or consultant.


5

The other answers/comments provide accurate information from the perspective of academia, where authorship (including co-authorship) is an important metric for achievement and prestige, and where a lot of attention is therefore given to its fair allocation. I'll add a perspective from someone who has jumped around between academia, industry, and the grey ...


17

Assuming that you really cannot be an author of this paper (about which I have doubts, see my comments), you cannot list it as a publication in your CV. An alternative, ethical way of taking credit for your efforts would be as follows: You can have a separate section in your CV called "Additional research experiences". There you could mention this ...


16

Would it be acceptable (conventional, ethical, etc.) for me to list this publication alongside the others (for which I am listed as author) on my CV? No. If you are not on the author list in the publication, never imply that you are on the author list in your CV. It's dishonest, even if you deserved to be on the author list.


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