New answers tagged

1

We cannot update submitted applications with new SOP or CV or other information. Unfortunately, this means that you will not be able to update your application due to the regulations of admission. Thus, overthinking it will not help but to make you uncomfortable. Regarding to your situation, there are two possible scenarios I can think of: The ...


0

There are few tips I can give, I am in no sense an expert on CV preperation. I just recently prepared a few. Most important thing to remember is the reviewer most likely is going to or has already reviewed more than a 100 applications and CVs. You are playing the game of attention grabbing. Reviewers will skim over papers and most likely won't go in detail ...


1

There is a power dynamic in the application process that any applicant needs to be conscious of. There are only a small number of positions for a large number of applicants, which grows to be a very large number at elite institutions. In other words, there is a significant power imbalance to the detriment of the applicant. The consequence of this is that ...


2

Personally, I'd like to say I would ignore such a mistake, and indeed my eyes would likely skip it. But if I noticed it, it would raise my brows. I'd suspect that either you are not using a spell checker on an important document (which would make me think less of you), or you've ignored some warning given to you (and spell checkers in fact do give lots of ...


2

It seems as if you have done all you could. If they won't accept supplementary material, then they won't. I'm not sure about the comment on not reading letters, though. It seems like it would be a flaw in the system as long as the letters are in (readable) English. If you get past initial screening you can raise such thing in interviews or in future ...


1

There are two main causes for incorrect spelling: You made a mistake, a typo, or you didn't know how to spell the word correctly. "mercandising" seems to be a typo. That's much more forgivable. Getting "your", and "you're" wrong would be more of a problem. I did review someone's CV before it was sent out and noticed "wether" was used instead of "whether". ...


11

I'll give a different answer, which is deliberately not an answer to the exact question you asked. Can you fix it? Can you overwrite your initial CV on the web application form, or ask the admissions administrator to replace it for you, or something like that? If so, then you should fix it, because you're trying to present your best self with your ...


1

OP asks, will the spelling error be a "major issue for my application" MAYBE. The spelling error on the first page is evidence that OP might not have read their own paper prior to submission. That is demonstrative of a lack of attention to detail. Whether writing a simple email or important application, take the time to read it at least once to catch ...


6

For the purpose of admissions it's unlikely to have any impact. If this were to support a job application, where a recruiter might have 500 resumes in front of them, and 95% of those resumes end up in the trash after one pass, you want to make every effort to prevent yours from being trashed, and every effort should be put into making sure your ...


63

I'll give the same answer as Allure, but for a very different reason. Not only is it common, but most people won't notice it. And of the few that do, fewer yet would think it an important enough issue to bother with. "Egad, this person misspelled a word. Horrors." Nope, it ain't gonna happen. But, you also need to be assured that no single thing, ...


16

No. Check this paper out. As of time of writing Google Scholar says it's received 3871 citations, which puts it well into the upper echelon of papers. And yet on page 50 there is ... To diagionalize the remaining four dimensions, we transform to a new set of variables Obvious typo, but it's far from uncommon and it doesn't stop people from reading and ...


1

It is common to include award values for research grants, including training fellowships, in a CV. Done with tact, I would see this as a positive and unlikely to be taken as arrogant.


2

I doubt that if I were reading the CV that I'd care one way or the other. If the award has a name or title, you should list that: Award/grant from IBM to support research in "glub-bending at the cusp". But adding the amount is also fine. My response to seeing the amount would be "interesting", but not "yay" or "nay". But the important thing, to me would be ...


3

My publication list is divided into sections, which in your case could look something like this (add/delete as appropriate) Journal papers Peer reviewed conference papers Peer reviewed short comment Non-peer reviewed conference abstracts The section with the comment in it would list only one publication, but that's ok. I generally put "...


2

If the contract for the grant is finalized, you can list it as an achievement on your CV.


5

I'd expand the entry, in my publication list, for the original paper by appending a reference to the reply. So the entry would look like: "List of authors, "Title of Paper", journal, volume (year), pages. See also "Title of reply", ibid., volume (year), pages."


15

Yes, but you would probably want to make separate lists of refereed and non-refereed publications. By putting the comment in the latter list, you do show that you engage with academic discussion, but you do not overclaim it as yet another refereed publication.


10

Generally you can put whatever you like in your CV. And generally the reader will judge whether it is a real thing or padding. If the reply is truly substantive then it might be worth including it (along with links to the comment you are replying to) so that a reader gets a more complete picture of the current state of the original publication. But I would, ...


9

I have served on several search committees lately for faculty members, and, honestly, I haven't seen one CV structure the peer review section in this fashion. In my personal opinion, doing so looks like CV padding. We all know that the reviewing process can have multiple read throughs and comments, so I do not think it is necessary to include the number of ...


3

A department will only issue one best MSc dissertation and top of year award per year. Perhaps even to the same student. So, the number of such awards are scarce and shouldn't be expected of every student. Of course, lesser awards, such as top mark in a certain module, are more common, but they're less prestigious and may be omitted. Scholarships or fee ...


2

Your observation is contradicted by virtually every researcher's CV I get when assessing grant proposals (natural sciences). People list their prizes as appropriate for their level (a professor will not list anything that happened during undergraduate studies, for example). The CV of Ulrich Schubert is quite representative here. As he is one of the most ...


1

This isn't true. Awards such as top of the class ("Bronze Tablets") are often listed by the GPA under the "education" heading. Undergraduates, especially in engineering, will often include "relevant" or "selected" course work that will highlight interesting projects.


4

As for all CVs, they get less important in time. If you're applying for graduate study straight after undergraduate, they're good to list. Your acheivements at this point are likely to be from academic performance, rather than from independent work. When you've completed the graduate programme, no one will care that you came top in Module X in your second ...


0

I can imagine that there may be circumstances that you declined an award that might still be worth mentioning you had the chance, but in general people don't do this. You don't list other jobs you were offered or other PhD places, just the ones you did choose. The only exception might be if you are very early career and this is about the only thing on your ...


8

Plagiarism is presenting someone else's novel work as your own. On a CV, you are not producing novel work, so novelty is not an issue. The only way to plagiarise a CV would be to copy someone else's CV's CONTENT and pretend it was your own personal history, when it wasn't. Even copying someone else's CV entry would be OK if you did exactly the same thing, ...


0

you should add in your CV only what you think it is favorable for you for the particular application. CVs are customizable for this reason. BTW regarding your case, I would not add the scholarship that you refused. Normally in CVs you mention only the funds that have been useful in your academic path.


20

Definitely not. Plagiarism is the use, in an academic, creative or intellectual context, of someone else's ideas or distinctive language, without proper attribution. It follows from this that in some forms of writing it is not possible to plagiarize: for instance, you cannot plagiarize in a lease or customer service agreement or in wedding thank you cards. ...


2

I would also agree with your gut feeling in this particular case. I can, however, think of a scenario where a declined award/scholarship should be included on your CV. In countries where you pay to study at a university, you can apply for scholarships/postgraduate awards/student funding. There is often a limit on how much funding an individual can accept. So,...


1

I would agree with your gut feeling: if you have a compelling reason to go to school A, it is better to leave it out of the application for school B. Motivation is also an important factor that selection committees take into account when deciding who to admit. If the award has already been irrevocably declined and lies in the past (i. e., if it cannot ...


0

I disagree with other commenters. I would absolutely recommend limiting the CV to one page. I don't want to speculate, but as a 3rd year student, you probably do not have much experience to mention anyway... Therefore, I think your CV is quite loose and not really compact. You need to tidy your CV and compactify it. For your case, your CV must have the ...


0

Do NOT remove or leave out relevant information. Somewhat counterintuitively, long CVs are perfectly acceptable in academia.


0

I think 2 pages are fine unless otherwise specified. However, I would order its content so that more distinctive traits are more visable (at least on the first page). These would be publications / projects / awards&honors.


Top 50 recent answers are included