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1

If you believe it affected your grades or would otherwise affect your application package in a significant way, you can go ahead and briefly mention it. If you go overboard on mentioning it and focus on your depression too much though, it won't necessarily be a good thing and could even backfire. If it's something like you took a gap year after graduating ...


4

When I am making a decision on a PhD application (for my department, not as prospective supervisor, in the UK) the question I need to answer is: Will this person, if admitted, in all likelihood do well in our programme and earn their PhD (through a good dissertation)? The question is definitely not Does this person deserve a shot at earning their PhD? Hence, ...


6

Based on the description, it sounds like everything that happened, occurred during this period: Then I wanted to study some additional topics before applying in Europe. So, took 1 year break and went home. That's all you need to say. It's true. You aren't under any obligation to go into details about what happened during that year in your personal life. I ...


6

Yes, you can do that, but I'd suggest caution until you know a lot more. Perhaps you should, at least, wait or explore further. Quoting a comment by Dan Romik: This sounds suspicious. Why only “provisionally”? What needs to happen in order to get the award non-provisionally? I suspect they’ll be asking you for money, which means it’s 100% a scam. Even if ...


2

"Under review" is better than "Pending" or "In progress". I would include them, but be clear. In some cases, it is appropriate to list the journal because there was a review and there are comments to address, in other cases, if you submit and have gotten nothing back, I'd recommend just listing "Under review".


13

If the gap is short enough that it is unlikely to be noticed, then ignore it for the CV. For a longer break give as few details as possible. Certainly nothing like what you write here. "Medical issues" or "Personal/family needs" is all you need to say. Reserve the CV for those things that show your productivity and skills, not for those ...


2

There is also always the possibility of just not listing it at all. Your CV is meant to highlight the positives of your career. We don't list the rejected papers and proposals and other failures :-)


6

Since you are still working on it and haven't abandoned it, it seems an obvious candidate for a "Work in Progress" section of your CV. Other current projects can be listed there also. You don't really need to apologize, especially in the CV.


1

Non-academic projects are fine, as long as they are related in some way to the field. So, for CS, your examples are fine. But coaching youth softball is probably better left out. Just keep it relevant. Caveat: this is a US based answer, where prior research experience isn't a requirement for doctoral admission. Other places may be similar or not.


1

Generally, in both industry and academia, it is my impression that people tend to quickly gloss over resumes and CV's, as time is a valuable commodity and such people are already busy with reading so many resumes/CV's amongst other things they have to do. Your best bet is to keep it short and concise on paper (i.e., short bullet points with relatively short ...


3

I would do both, meaning I would create a long version with 2-3 lines of description and a short version without (or describing only 1-2 projects). The trick is to submit the right version for each application (based on what the postdoc ad is asking for). (In case this helps: for me the "winner" was the short, 1-page version with 3 lines of ...


2

What I have come to understand is that in research your position, your affiliation, your status must not matter. The quality of your work cannot be overpowered and overshadowed by what or who you are.


5

I think it's fine to include projects on a CV that haven't been peer reviewed with a parenthetical that they are "submitted" or "in progress", especially for early-career researchers like undergraduate students. It's a bit weird when professors with a longer CV include these projects, but I doubt many people really count it against them (...


11

Your paper is a preprint. What you plan to do with it in the future is not relevant, or appropriate to include in your CV, in my humble opinion. It is generally assumed that authors of preprints are planning to submit their papers for publication, so listing your paper as “scheduled for submission”, or similar, will add nothing and make you seem clueless or ...


4

"Work in Progress" is pretty common and generally acceptable. You could make it a bit more specific if you like if you have an immediate need to send out a CV. "Work in Progress" is actually a good section to include in a CV since it implies that you are currently active. Such a section with a firm title for a paper will probably give ...


9

If you'd like to use your scores to show English proficiency, my personal preference would be to add it parenthetically in your language section, which would be good information for international applicants to include Languages: First language, XXXX; English (proficient: SAT verbal:XXX, TOEFL:ZZZ) -- or something along these lines. As for the math scores,...


2

I agree with the answer by Aolon that content matters much more than size, and I would add that what also matters are: Readability. Densitiy of information. Readability: I've sometimes seen people press a lot of (relevant) information into two pages, probably because somebody had told them that "a CV should not be longer than two pages"; this ...


5

We recently hired two PhD students, one with a 1,5-page-CV, the other with a 5,5-page-CV. What matters is the content. If you can fill 4 pages with relevant information, go for it, but I would go for 1-2 pages with hyperlinks to relevant content (LinkedIn, Google Scholar, your website, publications, ORCID, etc. - whichever you use).


3

I think you are complicating the situation by conflating two things. You would like to be able to provide evidence to support the entries in your CV. You want references attesting to your capability. For the first, I think it would be reasonable to ask your boss/supervisor to provide a 'To whom it may concern' letter on headed notepaper recording the ...


2

An alternative to an open letter, that has its own advantages is as follows. First, tell people that the time will come in the future that you will want/need their support in the form of letters. It is best if you do this when actually requesting a letter so that they have an opportunity to archive it for future reference. More important, however, is to keep ...


5

I would have no problem providing a generic open letter of recommendation. Other academics might. If you ask respectfully a "no" answer should not have any negative impact on future requests for particular letters. I regularly share letters of recommendation for students with the students. They have usually waived their right to see them, but I ...


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