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A PhD is a very high level qualification but going from psychology to biomedical engineering is quite a big change. So anybody who wants to hire somebody to do biomedical engineering would need some pretty strong arguments why they should hire you as a psychology phd. This applies to the professor looking for a postdoc the same way as in industry. In ...


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I don't know other countries, and I only know the situations in the U.S. If you are a postdoc, then you are considered an employee, and the university has to pay you; otherwise, this is a serious violation of labor law, and I bet no regular universities would do this. If you are a visiting scholar to an American university to conduct research, then the ...


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Seems most positions should have a shortlist for interview within this week (probably 1 week before the NSF announcement and 2 weeks before the Coordinance). You should send an email to each position you are interested in to ask for the progress. At least half of them will give you a clear answer and for the rest, you should never think about them again.


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If you haven't yet started the process, then a letter of intent is probably just a notice that you intend to apply and when. If you are required to have a supervisor as part of the application process then you may need to indicate who you are working with to that end. Late in the process it would be different, more likely an indication that you would ...


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I think I know what you're going through, since I'm also from a materials background and need to work with teams comprising mechanical engineers/physicists on mostly inter-disciplinary topics. Through some limited experience with your specified sub-field, I am quite confident that materials science by itself has very unique and valid contributions to make, ...


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I do not think that any of these are realistic strategies. Sorry. If you are in a field where there are many jobs, you may be able so separately obtain positions which are in the same city. Spousal hire arrangements are used to recruit highly prestigious candidates to permanent faculty positions. It would be unusual to have the resources to use that ...


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I believe that in math the first round of postdoc offers usually go out shortly after the NSF announces who will be receiving NSF postdocs. This usually happens in late January. After that, offers tend to go out when (or if) previous offers were declined.


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This question is too broad to answer. Many PIs will not hire a postdoc without strong letters of reference. On the other hand some PIs will not care. Although I suspect in this case you would have to be an obviously very strong researcher. (Even though personally I find it hard to believe that references wouldn't be asked for. Even if you're a star ...


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Many universities have mandatory requirements for letters of recommendation (LoR) for a postdoc position, and that's the main reason they ask you to submit LoR. There were some PI who interviewed me told me this and also told me that they wouldn't even care what my referees would write about me. They were willing to hire me immediately after they have three ...


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If the contract for the grant is finalized, you can list it as an achievement on your CV.


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No matter what you do, or how carefully you apply, a better job can always come up later. The decision you have to make is not "is this my perfect job?", because unless there's a specific single position that you have your eye on, there's no such thing; it's "is this position good enough that I'd take it if offered?". If it is, then do the interview, and ...


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A non-Sweden-specific answer: A post-doctoral researcher is not a student. (That is, except in the sense that all researchers are "students" of the subjects they study.) Thus, what you're asking is: Can a post-doctoral researcher working under the supervision of another, senior researcher switch "bosses"? I believe this clarifies things somewhat, and ...


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(I'm faculty at Chalmers University of Technology, a well-known private university in Gothenburg, Sweden) The pragmatic question (whether it's a good idea to change supervisors mid-flight) is covered well by posdef, I'll focus on the legal angle here. As you mention, PhD students have quite some rights in Sweden, but this is mostly because they are in a ...


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Just to add a few things to posdef's great answer. I think it's worth mentioning that a PhD and a postdoc position are very different in terms of work dynamics with the "supervisor", and trying to compare the two is a bit questionable: The primary purpose of a PhD student position is to provide the student with specialized research training under the ...


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TLDR: It will depend very heavily on the funding situation. A reasonable guess as to why there is a clear remark about the PhD students and not about the postdocs is that how postdocs are employed varies significantly. Without having any proof, I would guess that you can't change your mentor however you like if s/he is paying you. Because why would you ...


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Postdoctoral positions usually (always?) come with a salary. So yes, for all academic disciplines, postdoctoral researchers are funded. The funds can come from your PI grant (in which case getting funds is not your problem), or from a university directly, or from a funding agency. The rules and regulations of providers vary widely: many large agencies make ...


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Here are some examples where it might be possible: You could probably get funding for for work at an EU university that required, say, archaeological work in Thailand. There are lots of similar situations. Some fields are like that. Some scholars need access to library materials that are not portable. Ancient Maya stelae for example. You have to go there ...


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Select Ph.D. over D.Eng. In a job application, you want to make it as easy as possible for the reader to understand your qualifications. Ph.D. is well known. D.Eng. Is obscure.


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Absolutely, let all of them know immediately. If you are going to be working with people, they will want to know they can trust you. They will want you to be where you can be most productive. They may very well have noticed, but I don't see that as relevant. What matters is that you are honest and open with your future employers, and that you trust them to ...


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There is certainly no point in hiding any of this from A, B, or C. (In fact, they might already know.) What you'll want to avoid, is both of them offering you a position and making them wait on the answer. This could potentially cause them to miss the opportunity to hire their second choice for the other position. (The longer they wait with sending out an ...


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I would start out by assuming that all of the PIs will know if you apply to any of them. If the conditions for the various positions (pay, etc) are similar then I see no reason not to mention it. Perhaps the three of them together can find you a slot, even if one can't. This would probably be different if the pay and such were quite different. And note ...


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Some universities have a center or organization for teaching, which can provide resources for getting started. You might also check out https://opensyllabus.org/


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Some do teaching as part of their Masters or PhD studies. Others do a teacher training course before, or after, Masters or PhD. Some do teacher training without wanting to do a Masters or PhD and teacher training courses can be short (about 1 year) or longer.


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