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Its depends what you mean by "okay". You can certainly ask, and you will not face any consequences beyond possibly some mild irratation on the part of the PI, but unlikely sufficient to damage anyone's chances of anything. However, you are probably also unlikely to gain anything. The most likely situations are: The position has been offered to ...


1

I had got the offer and signed it two weeks ago. Probably, the delay was due to specific preparations and justifications related to papers and so on. Meanwhile, I hope this question will be helpful for other persons. Just be patient and accurate in your actions. Now, I must resolve the visa question at the time of US embassies are predominantly closed all ...


1

Sorry, this doesn't seem to be a good idea, especially considering some of the more subtle points you've shared. In general taking post-docs after 5-6 years need not be a bad thing, but people would generally shoot for a prestigious fellowship, not something through personal contacts. I also want to recommend that you take this just because of how unhappy ...


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My Bayesian assessment is "bad idea". You may get others who just want to reassure you, but I feel compelled to caution you. Move to another company somehow or push your bosses into a new assignment. If you're really stuck in your role, maybe consider an MBA. (If you can get into a top 10 school...doesn't make sense to self-fund an MBA with time ...


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If I were in your situation, I would just show the ones from grad school that were first author. You should have a few from the last year or two of the degree and they may have even come out after you left. I would not enclose the non-FA papers. Don't open that box. (But of course show them on your CV, since that has everything.) And I would not have ...


2

Every paper published by a reputable publisher is a good paper and should be on the CV. Advising students who rightly have first authorship is also a good thing. In some fields, advisors aren't co-authors no matter the input on student papers. It think it a mistake to leave such things off of the CV. In fact, somewhere in your application materials you might ...


2

she has to think about grants and funding as she will be taking a couple of postdocs. After waiting for one month, she requested to wait for a few more months for her to be certain. This professor seemingly has no money to hire you. You should look elsewhere, whilst maintaining contact. If she gets money, it seems you are amongst those she'll consider ...


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To answer your second question first, the Marie Curie fellowships require evidence of mobility - specifically, that you haven't worked in the proposed host country for more than 12 months total in the past three years. So if you join a lab in, say, France, after one year you will no longer be able to apply for a MSCA fellowship in France. However, you'd ...


2

No, you cannot. The two visa categories you mention (which are indeed the typical "postdoc" visas) explicitly do not allow what you have in mind. J1 visas are for for exchange visitors who are funded either through scholarships/fellowships or their host institution. They explicitly do not allow for self-funded postdocs. Similarly, a H1B Visa is for ...


6

I don’t know about the visa, but even aside from that there are legal, ethical and reputation issues with your idea. Considering all of those, I’m 99% certain that neither MIT nor any other reputable university will give even passing consideration to the idea of an unpaid postdoc. On the legal side, there is this thing called minimum wage that forces ...


20

I've seen this terminology particularly in the UK, though I don't know how widespread it is. In each of the UK jobs I've seen with this phrasing, the "person specification" was a very clearly labelled part of the advertisement for the opening, or in some cases a separate PDF document. It contained a bulleted list of items clarifying both "...


4

Most of the other answers get the logistics right, you can typically make an arrangement like this at 80/20, but not both full-time. That said I think the other answers are failing to make clear how serious a problem trying to get around this could be. I am not a lawyer, but this would almost certainly be fraud, and might open you or your PI’s up for ...


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At some universities, you might get under-100% contracts and in those cases, I agree that having a small extra-job is ok. Say, you accept short-term extra pay for collaborating on a paper from another university, or a 20% job elsewhere if you're hired 80% at your main place. In those cases, it's customary to let both institutions know. It's ok to have ...


3

I do not think that your employers will agree to such a construction (after all, they both pay you for a fulltime job), but even if they do, I would strongly advise you not to do it. I have no experience with parallel postdoc positions, but I tried to combine two part-time jobs for some years (with the knowledge of both employers), and I think there are some ...


1

It is rare but OK (within contracts) to be paid to do the same work by two different entities. The problem arise when Uni A will tell you: "hey, i want you to work on problem XYZ now" and organization B tells you "keep working on QWE problem". Now what you gonna do? You can try working 16hrs a day, but that is usually a recipe for ...


7

About your last question, let me add something to Federico's answer. Unless you are a lawyer, and I'm not one, in Italy it is frequently difficult to properly navigate and understand the constraints imposed by the law but, as far as I understand, both the RTD-A and RTD-B positions1 require a PhD or equivalent title2. These are the current entry points if you ...


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The doctorate in Italy (dottorato di ricerca) was officially instituted in 1982, and the first courses started in 1983, so it was definitely not a common thing in the 1980s. People even got full professor positions without having one (since it did not exist). Post-secondary education was not standardized across nations then like it is today; Italian ...


4

I don't see any reason to express where you learned about a job advertisement, except if it was emailed personally to from whoever you learned about it, and not widely distributed. However, usually these are mass emails sent to a large number of people (recognizable by several factors). In that sense, I don't see any reason why you would need to state how ...


0

Learning wet lab techniques takes time and practice. I was a slice electrophysiologist in my "past life", and even now I expect it would take me several months to a year or two to get anywhere near my peak productivity as a graduate student. Maybe not every wet lab experience is as fickle as that, but I feel my colleagues in molecular biology have ...


36

There isn’t an employer in the US who will agree to pay you a salary knowing that you are also getting a salary from another employer for working during the same hours. If we’re talking about moonlighting during the weekend, that would be something else, but what you are proposing? No. The lack of tangible work requirements is irrelevant, it’s just a non-...


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It is hard to predict what is "possible". Your contract(s) and policies may stipulate expectations. But to be safe, I would suggest, only do this with everyone's knowledge and permission. I doubt that it would be given, I guess, but you could suffer if you do it "on the sly". If you do a good job in both and no one learns of the deception ...


0

You should work to improve your record, however you can, but it is what it is, so you have to deal with that. I think, however, that choosing a postdoc purely by counting papers would be pretty foolish. The question should be, and, I hope, usually is, how good a fit is this candidate for this position. I can't guarantee that everyone is rational, of course, ...


1

Given that 10 minutes is very short, a quick mention about aspects for which you do have some ideas would be in order. But be prepared for questions about details if there is a follow up question period. You needn't spend much time on this. However, if you have special expertise and interest in some particular aspect, then spending a couple of minutes ...


1

This advisor's "negligence" is an act of academic bullying. There is a few things one can do to counter academic bullying, but one has to think them thoroughly well in advance. I'm not writing them here, by now, since some advisors could read them to neutralize counter-bullying. Maybe you can get some advice from a union representative or someone ...


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You might've been the subject of a stress interview. These interviews are supposed to put you on the defensive and see how you react under pressure. For example, the interviewer might ask "your CV looks inadequate, what makes you think you can do this job?" This question is obviously aggressive, but it's kind of the point: it shows how you react. ...


2

Maybe you should try to see it from the other perspective. What would you do if you had to decide between two candidates and cannot decide based on the interview. If you are not involved in HR hiring standards, you could easily try to break the tie by scheduling a second round of interviews on the fly. Postdoc positions tend to be short for getting ...


20

What do you think about the situation, is this a normal routine for postdoc interviews? No. It’s not normal in several ways. It’s not normal for a postdoc interview to have someone else schedule your interview for a specific time without consulting you first about whether the time works for you. It’s doubly not normal when you are informed of the interview ...


32

It's not respectful to applicants for the interview process to be unclear or changed at the last minute. However, for various reasons, many of them completely innocent (busy people, miscommunications), this may happen. It's also not always transparent what an interviewer is looking for. If the interview has you attempt "Task A", it may not be ...


2

I doubt that it would be treated as a negative thing, but just a failure of communication. I think that in some places, however, unsolicited letters commenting on a person have legal issues. You may be asked to explain it, of course, and you might want to talk to that letter writer as well so that you understand what happened. Perhaps they misunderstood ...


1

If the alternative is a gap year then it is a good idea to take it or, at least, consider it. Presumably a visiting assistant professor, if you don't hold an academic position elsewhere, is just about the same as a post-doc but under a different name, since it isn't tenure-track. It would, of course, depend on what is expected of you. If the duties are very ...


0

The requirement to have a strong publication record on top-tier conferences is very common and it is important when you look for academic positions. I believe it is well-known and well-accepted among the researchers. I study databases and when I started my Ph.D., my advisor told me that he wants me to have three to four publications before graduation. When ...


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Disclaimer: This is not specifically from a mathematics study or USA perspective, but I think some perspectives may be helpful. Take them with a pinch of salt, depending on local factors. I started a research career in an applied lab before enrolling for a PhD. Presently I am, like you, in my third year of PhD, and generally struggle to juggle office work ...


2

Not necessarily. BUT, is it worth the risk? Whether a post doc now will help or hurt depends on many things, such as, even, why you are leaving a TT position now and what your trajectory is. A perfect in every way post doc might help, but I'd think that anything less is leaving you on a treadmill without a sure path to progress. And you don't describe this ...


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