Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

New answers tagged

-1

If you've reached the on campus interview stage there should be some informal discussion of the job offer parameters then: salary range, teaching load, startup funding, ... You and the institution will each find out then if you are on the same page. If the interview leads to an offer you may be able to negotiate adjustments. By that time there should be ...


0

I found it typical that you would be asked for your requirements. If you ask for a lot, then you will need to negotiate. But if you ask for a lot, be prepared to say why. It isn't enough to just say "I want...". But if you have needs for initial research support or travel or whatever, then say that at the informal discussion phase. If your "needs" aren't ...


3

To answer your question, according to some, the best time to negotiate is after an offer has been given by the potential employer. For one thing, they have already ruled out other candidates and they have now essentially decided on giving the position to you. The hiring process is arduous from their perspective as well and the last thing they want to do is ...


2

There's obviously not a single answer to this question. How many papers you have published may dictate to whom you send the CV, but how you write it is something different. You can always try to apply for a position as you are, or you can try to do a post-doc and get some more publications. Other than that, the CV advice is the same as any CV. Emphasize ...


0

From the company's point of view there are two different recruitment scenarios. One is simply "maintaining the workforce" to replace the inevitable losses that occur over time. These are usually entry-level positions, and the main objective is to hire the right number of people who are "good enough". The skills and qualifications required are not specific ...


1

Advise the researcher of their options beyond their current trajectory, discuss the differences between trajectories, and establish what they really want. (Just because a research says they, want a permanent academic position in five years and professorship ten years after, doesn't mean they've thoroughly considered and understood what this will entail!) The ...


13

Honestly, without putting down. Explain the weaknesses of their approach or profile, explain what they would have to change in your opinion to get where they want and explain what they can do if it does not work this way. The point is not discouragement, but letting them understand what their options are. Some people are able to rise far above their ...


0

You are better off clearing the Australian Dental Council exam anyways.


0

To get things out there: Applying for another PhD after your first PhD is possible and I know a few excellent researchers who are now professors who have two PhDs. It does depend on the field you are moving into of course, but coming from Physics I think your options are good. Basically anything that you can fill in while you work will be relevant. Where do ...


2

Think about your audience. They are asking this question because they want to know how you'll contribute to the teaching of the department. Only listing the title of the course would provide a little information (what you'll teach), but probably not all of what they're listening for (how you'll teach or how your teaching interests will fit in their ...


5

It would depend, perhaps, on how you characterize your "gap" to a future potential employer. If you treat it as a negative that might be easily picked up. But needing to unwind after an intense five years is pretty normal. Wanting time to publish is a positive thing. Wanting to continue current productive relationships is also a good thing. So, ...


0

I don't see a problem with contacting him, though his reasons for leaving may not be relevant to your situation. There seem to be a lot of red flags here, but it is possible that they are false alarms. I would send him a note saying that you are under consideration for a position at the given department and asking if he has any advice he is willing to ...


2

First, you should be aware that on-campus CS faculty interviews have already started. Yes, yes, I know that even the earliest application deadlines are still several weeks away, but at least in some departments (like mine), stellar candidates can be (and have been) invited to interview well before the application deadline. That said, you should not worry ...


1

The conference window is pretty small. I'm not sure why you'd be concerned. You should get, from any reasonable institution, some leeway in scheduling an interview. I think that is especially true in a case like this. Even more so if you were presenting, though you don't indicate that you are. And it might even turn out that some institutions will also ...


Top 50 recent answers are included