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2

I don't know if it will be detrimental or not, but if the two positions are in the same division of a college or university, the same Dean likely is the final decision maker for both positions. If there is a search committee for each position, there is a chance that there may be faculty with cross-appointments who sit on both committees. I see possibilities ...


2

Assuming both jobs are in the same department: Ask the contact person. (If that contact person won't be on the hiring committee, then get in contact with someone who is.) Assuming both jobs are in different departments: (IMO) Departments are independent and two applications will not overlap at the department level. (They will, of course, overlap within the ...


1

Many years ago a friend of mine went back to school after a bit of a detour and wrapped up his PhD at the ripe old age of 31, then started applying to academic positions. One response, from a highly-regarded east coast school, was a rejection stating "we're looking for younger candidates, thank you for your interest." No doubt an outlier, but it ...


2

Since there seems to be some uncertainty in the other answer / comment thread, I will offer my point of view. (I'm a MCF in a French university.) If you just want the answer, skip to the section that starts by It depends below. You are misreading the information available. Qualification was removed for PR jobs. It remains mandatory in most cases to be a ...


0

Its depends what you mean by "okay". You can certainly ask, and you will not face any consequences beyond possibly some mild irratation on the part of the PI, but unlikely sufficient to damage anyone's chances of anything. However, you are probably also unlikely to gain anything. The most likely situations are: The position has been offered to ...


4

Internships. An internship or two will give you a taste of what a nonacademic career might entail and give your employers insight into you as a potential candidate. It's not uncommon for employers to view internships as a sort of extended interview. I have no doubt you'll learn things and see things you hadn't anticipated, perhaps interesting paths to follow....


1

I had got the offer and signed it two weeks ago. Probably, the delay was due to specific preparations and justifications related to papers and so on. Meanwhile, I hope this question will be helpful for other persons. Just be patient and accurate in your actions. Now, I must resolve the visa question at the time of US embassies are predominantly closed all ...


1

I take it this is in the United States. In that case, letters are never provided by the applicant. A list of references would be provided by the applicant.


3

Speaking from the perspective of a roboticist with publications in the conferences you listed and in Science: Hiring for industry jobs (especially at junior levels) is going to be focused on finding employees who can use and modify existing robotics paradigms to achieve company goals. Conference papers (especially at the venues you name) provide useful ...


1

If I were in your situation, I would just show the ones from grad school that were first author. You should have a few from the last year or two of the degree and they may have even come out after you left. I would not enclose the non-FA papers. Don't open that box. (But of course show them on your CV, since that has everything.) And I would not have ...


6

It depends on what field you are in and the types of jobs you are looking at. In computer science, conferences are typically valued more than journals, although this doesn't necessarily mean the quality of the papers at conferences are better than journals. A popular computer science department ranking site, CSRankings, does their rankings by top conferences,...


2

Every paper published by a reputable publisher is a good paper and should be on the CV. Advising students who rightly have first authorship is also a good thing. In some fields, advisors aren't co-authors no matter the input on student papers. It think it a mistake to leave such things off of the CV. In fact, somewhere in your application materials you might ...


5

In many fields and countries, it's rare to get a tenure-track position right after a PhD. Generally speaking, if you want to go into tenure-track academia, a strong post-doc or two (or three depending on the field), with good publications is an asset, though it is also good to build up a teaching dossier. I suspect the post-doc would allow you to be a more ...


0

Sometimes hiring committees prefer a letter coming directly from the evaluator, as opposed to via the candidate, as it may be more candid.


1

Given that 10 minutes is very short, a quick mention about aspects for which you do have some ideas would be in order. But be prepared for questions about details if there is a follow up question period. You needn't spend much time on this. However, if you have special expertise and interest in some particular aspect, then spending a couple of minutes ...


0

You might've been the subject of a stress interview. These interviews are supposed to put you on the defensive and see how you react under pressure. For example, the interviewer might ask "your CV looks inadequate, what makes you think you can do this job?" This question is obviously aggressive, but it's kind of the point: it shows how you react. ...


2

Maybe you should try to see it from the other perspective. What would you do if you had to decide between two candidates and cannot decide based on the interview. If you are not involved in HR hiring standards, you could easily try to break the tie by scheduling a second round of interviews on the fly. Postdoc positions tend to be short for getting ...


1

I don't have a definitive answer because this is the first time I hear about this, but from following the links you provided, here is what I think is happening. First some comments. "link2" further links to the actual text of the law, but I don't think you really want to read it. It is very, very long. Next, you early on in your question equate ...


20

What do you think about the situation, is this a normal routine for postdoc interviews? No. It’s not normal in several ways. It’s not normal for a postdoc interview to have someone else schedule your interview for a specific time without consulting you first about whether the time works for you. It’s doubly not normal when you are informed of the interview ...


32

It's not respectful to applicants for the interview process to be unclear or changed at the last minute. However, for various reasons, many of them completely innocent (busy people, miscommunications), this may happen. It's also not always transparent what an interviewer is looking for. If the interview has you attempt "Task A", it may not be ...


3

I am curious to know the current timeline amid the COVID-19 pandemic starting 2020. There is not one. It is utter chaos because nobody knows how much money they will have next fall.


2

The academic decision clock can run very slowly. If you don't have other options then I'd suggest some patience. There may be a number of interviews they need to have with others and there may be issues about scheduling decision meetings. Lots of things can slow it down. If you have a specific need to know about the decision then you can be a bit more ...


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