New answers tagged

0

All changes of job or career, big or small, have this kind of risk. It probably depends on how long you stay in the regulatory job. Probably if you do it for one year, then you will know whether you like it, and you won't have been away from academic work for too long. It's honestly an amazing opportunity that I would love to pursue In that case you should ...


0

I recommend you think about this from the perspective of a student, if the shoe was on the other foot --- i.e., while you were doing your undergraduate degree, would you have been happy being taught rhetoric, composition, and creative writing (in an English-speaking university) by a university lecturer who is competent in these fields in their own language, ...


3

This surely depends on the position as associated qualifications. In the Canadian province of Quebec for instance, there are many universities where the language of instruction is French; I have several colleagues who emigrated to Mexico for position where the language of instruction was Spanish, and they were not initially fluent in Spanish. So yes you can ...


2

It is impossible to say and it will probably vary by region. The new variant may not be the last and it is unlikely that it will be. There is a lot of vaccine resistance and misinformation. Unfortunately, the pressures to ignore the problem and just "return to normal" can (and have) make the problem worse. But visas may be hard to get. Hope for the ...


1

There is a clear endpoint for a postdoc - the end of your contract. You can search for a job and set the start date to the end of your postdoc contract. Six months before the end of that contract is a nice time to start: it takes time to conduct a job search, then to schedule interviews, technical tests, and whatnot. Then when you are asked when you can ...


6

You present two option: Should I stay longer (perhaps until the end of my contract) and try to finish my projects and write up the results? Or should I try to leave as soon as possible? I would take a third approach based upon the answer by toby544. I would figure out what type of industry job you want and what skills are need for that industry job and ...


-1

While it's plain sad to say things like that... Leave asap. Time is precious. Every day you spend on something you think is a dead end is a day not spent on something better. Sit down with yourself, think long and hard about what you actually want out of your life, then go after it. No job title is ever a goal in itself, it's just a shorthand for some other ...


5

Find out more about jobs in industry. It will be very helpful to have some idea what it is like when you apply for jobs. Could you get an internship in industry for a few months? If not, there are probably many other ways to find out about these jobs. I don't understand the point about your supervisor losing interest in you. I don't think you need to tell ...


3

I'm not sure why you think she doesn't appreciate your work. Every indication you give here suggests otherwise. She thinks you contribute a lot (more than others), she wanted to extend your contract, etc. I think you will get a good letter, but you can ask her about it directly, though that is a bit uncomfortable. And, in any case, a letter from the ...


3

How long can I be unemployed before it looks bad on my academic curriculum? Two months will not look bad. More than six months is likely to look bad, assuming there is not a reason for unemployment which is beyond your control. In between two and six months is a matter of personal opinion.


6

After finishing my PhD i had a six month contact with the lab next door to my PhD lab. I was unemployed for a year after finishing that, very much like you i published two papers (and a textbook chapter) during that time. I kept up with the field, keeping in contact with the lab i had a six month position with. Nobody has ever questioned that one year gap in ...


4

A three month gap between completing your PhD and your first postdoc does not look bad, especially because of the pandemic. Since there is no guarantee you will get an offer in January, I think it is a mistake to not accept one of your three current offers. A one year gap is certainly far worse than one year spent in a sub-optimal postdoc. You should expect ...


5

An additional point to consider: for an academic career, the publication output after the PhD is crucial. One of the typical measures of success a hiring committee will look at is how many publications there are in the years after the PhD (besides obviously the quality of the publications and if the candidate had a leading role, etc.) So if it's more than a ...


15

I don't know your field, but at least in my area (chemistry): Postdocs almost exclusively last two years or less. Some are for as little as 6 months. Even the two year postdocs are often phrased as "one year, with the option for two if mutually agreed upon". On the academic track, it is expected to do multiple postdocs before trying to get, say, a ...


26

There is no max, really, but the longer you stay out, the harder it gets to get back in. If you skills get cold/old, if you lose contact with recommenders, if the market changes, then all is uncertain. You seem to be letting the perfect be the enemy of the good here. Another thing is that you have three "birds" in the hand, but wanting the one in ...


0

Short answer: no, not really Although it sometimes happens, it is quite rare for the topic of a dissertation to align with later professional work --- a fortiori when it is only a bachelor dissertation. Most of the time the bachelor degree functions as a means of giving broad tertiary instruction in a field and then signalling baseline competence in that ...


1

[This answer is from a North American perspective; it may apply less elsewhere. And it speaks in generalities.] When industry is hiring at the Bachelor's level, they are generally looking for general academic success, an overall knowledge of a broad area (the "major"), and some evidence of ability for independent work (evidenced, for instance, by a ...


0

There are too many variables to give a definite response. It could matter. It might not matter at all. I think that in most fields, at least, it is still rare for undergraduates to write a thesis. If that is so in your field, then anything you write is probably a plus. It also depends on the type of job you want, as well as your future aspirations, e.g. ...


0

I work in industry. Our recruiters often instruct candidates to use the STAR approach to answer behavior questions. For example: Situation: Did research on criminology. Did not get the promised dataset. Task: analyze Hannibal Lecter's behavior. Action: collected different data to unblock yourself; met Hannibal in prison. Result: publish papers. Just state ...


4

The strategy for getting back on track will depend on whether you are going for a job in industry or academia. You say at the end: I'm prioritizing work in industry (research and policy-related) over academia, if that changes any answers at all (this experience has burnt me out too much). This implies to me that your goal was academia, but you are now ...


9

Your best bet, when moving from academia to industry, is to demonstrate transferable skills. No one (outside of academia) really gives a toss about how many publications have your name on it. Whining about your supervisor won't impress any recruiters (no matter how justified your grievances may well be!). Everyone has to deal with rubbish bosses/colleagues ...


5

As an opening observation, while it is a great shame to have had a poor experience with your supervisor, and the lack of progress that this entails, at the end of the day, it is only 3-5 years of your life and career, and you can certainly recover from that. So I would start by looking at this as a situation where you had a setback, but that is just a small ...


6

To put it short, removing the elephant in the room, you think you are a good researcher and teacher, you learned all the tools to do research, but your research is not good enough? You are on very solid ground, unfortunately the project(s) you were following did not go anywhere. But you can always present proof of the work done, you can say (and write in ...


10

When you go for a job interview, they don't really care about your past achievements. They are really trying to judge what you are capable of achieving in the future. You will be asked about previous work, but your results are less important than demonstrating the skills that will be necessary for the job. They will probably prefer to hear that you had to ...


18

Blaming others is rarely a positive strategy, and it is usually not a good idea for student to criticize their supervisor, or for that matter for supervisors to criticize their students. The general opinion (at least in physics academia) is that good people find a way to do good work. Possibly the work is not as well received, or as prolific at it could ...


1

As a former arithmetic geometer currently on the industry job market, here's some advice/observations, current as of 2021 (things in industry do rapidly change though, so stay vigilant). I'm speaking from a US perspective and don't know anything about how this changes in other countries. I'm also talking about the labor market in a big US city with a large ...


2

Sure, if you are willing to learn those technologies, and not treat coworkers as servants that convert your PhD magic into code. It is very rare that a PhD has enough skills/value to the company that he can continue doing the equivalent of research without doing "boring" stuff like coding/cloud stuff. In other words if you can get PhD you easily ...


0

I think that, unfortunately, a lot of thoughts are focusing on the medieval idea of a piece of paper giving enormous advantage with respect to not having it. The work you need to finish your PhD is probably enormous, you may have the chance to find an employer that is in favour of you ending your PhDs in the first months of employment (possible benefit for ...


5

I do entry level recruitment for the technical division of a large company and the features that we look for in a successful candidate are: A numerate degree in a scientific or engineering discipline. An obvious interest in the technical field for which we are recruiting. Good problem-solving skills. The basics of at least one programming language. Not ...


2

Speaking from people I knew in college, many physics and math majors, including Masters and PhDs, had no trouble ending up at tech jobs such as programmer, data scientist, or in quantitative finance. Companies have different hiring strategies, but many interviewers look for general problem-solving ability and reasoning skills, and are willing to look past ...


5

I had to do a double-take when you said AI/ML to even say I recognized one of the acronyms and tech buzz terms. First job in tech was 22 years ago at age 35ish with a high school diploma. Everyone I've worked needs a quick-study, problem solver. If you have social skills, even better. I've been blessed with many opportunities, and many I wasn't qualified ...


3

My answer is slightly different: Yes you can do it, if you are willing to adapt. No one expects a new hire to hit the ground running at full speed---for every job there's an expectation that it will take some time for you to learn the environment, the culture, and the requirements. The toolkit you develop in a PhD program may or may not align perfectly with ...


2

I did a PhD in theoretical computer science and I'm currently a (senior) software engineer at Facebook. This is counter-intuitive, but after a PhD, interviews at bigger companies are easier than those at smaller companies. Smaller companies often look for specialists. You are expected to be an expert in the tech stack in the job descriptions. On the ...


3

I think it really depends on the University, but I finished my PhD without a single paper. My paper was written 1.5 years before my defense, but my supervisor could never stop with his improvement ideas. When I realized that there is no way to finish my PhD I pushed it to defense like that, without a paper. In the end, everyone is interested in students ...


7

I am very familiar with how AI/ML works, but I am not too familiar with all these softwares... It just seems there is no need to publish a paper using any of these tools. It almost seem that you need an entirely separate graduate degree to fully meet these criteria. You don't need a degree to meet these criteria, you just need to learn on the job for a ...


5

Job posting are often written by clueless HR personnel often times with the best of intentions don't know what any of the terms mean. You don't have to be the best candidate they would want, you just need to be the best candidate out of the pool of replies. Most job postings would say something to the effect that the employer reserves the right not to make ...


8

First, I am really sorry for you as you are in a really stressful and difficult situation. 2 months is incredibly short to get a paper published. But I know people that get their PhD with a paper under review, you may ask your PhD committee is that is okay. If it is not, I really encourage you to discuss with your supervisor how much time he thinks ...


6

Programming was a second career I picked up out of necessity --it had previously been a hobby. My degree was in the humanities (philosophy). In about 10 years I've advanced steadily from an entry level position to being near the top of the career ladder at my company. My story is not unusual. Just recently I had a conversation with a colleague who was a bus ...


10

I've lived this myself. I got a Ph.D in Electrical Engineering, and mostly did linear algebra (math) and software simulations with Monte Carlo statistics. I can't fix your toaster, do wiring, etc. So for me, I did audio firmware which sort of double-counts as EE and software engineering, for about 5 years. I eventually wound up becoming a software engineer, ...


40

This is my original answer, but please also see the update below where I changed my advice based on some clarifications in the comments. I think you should try to finish the PhD. You are so close, and really it's the major reward you get for the years of toil on your projects. If you drop out now, you will not have a tangible record to show for all your ...


31

Yes, you can survive there By way of personnal background (so you know that I have some knowledge of this stuff), my career is as a statistician in academia and consulting, with the latter being in the tech field where similar requirements are often set out for positions. Much of my academic work has been theory, but I've also been able to work effectively ...


15

You absolutely can do it. This answer will focus on data science, since that matches the job description you posted. I know people with similar profiles who have made the transition. It will take some work to fill in some gaps in your experience, and to think about how to make your experience relatable to an employer. Even if you don't use the tools they are ...


7

I would advise against it. As you say, fluff. If you are applying at all, they realize you have interest. Focus on your fit for the position. It would have no bearing on whether you are chosen. Save your words for things that do.


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