New answers tagged

1

If I was considering hiring you, I would want to know more about why you were let go from 4 positions in 2 years. You said in the question that it wasn't for you. In my opinion a sign of professionalism is being able to do work, even if you are not intrinsically motivated to do it.


-1

Permanent academic jobs almost always involve teaching and managerial tasks as significant components, whereas postdoc jobs can be almost entirely research-focused. Hence, if you like research better than teaching or management, that could be a valid reason to apply for a postdoc job rather than a permanent academic job at any stage of your career. (...


5

I think the answer you have now isn't so bad. But you could be painting yourself in better light. Rather than saying jobs in academia in the pay range and stability you aspired to were too competitive, say you preferred the higher pay and stability you could access in industry. It's the same sentiment but doesn't point to you somehow failing. Many good ...


1

If it's a FAANG, they might interview you for a level higher - so you get system design questions instead of basic interview questions. However, if you did your PhD in Math or CS (except maybe OS design or something similar), you should hope for the standard interview questions. There are two ways you can fail a typical coding interview: You cannot solve ...


-1

You ask if it "is the norm", so I need to say no. Some people love puzzles and will do such things. Others want to get the job done in their research and "coding" is only a means to an end. It needn't be "leet" to be useful, even vitally important. Moreover, don't confuse Computer Science with Computer Programming. The latter is ...


3

A significant part of the EU's research framework program (current Horizon 2020) funding is for industrial and technology research, so companies (or consortia which also contain companies) are eligible for funding. However, the idea here would be to ultimately aim for developing a product - thus, a pure R&D company like what you mention might not be the ...


4

There are employers our there that hire PhDs to do something that looks more or less like research. However, research positions for a single small topic of research are incredibly rare, and will usually be filled by hunting high-profile established researchers; a typical example would be computer security departments of big IT names. This happens when a ...


Top 50 recent answers are included