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"Lecturer" is the main entry-point academic rank in the UK system, and spans quite a wide range of pay grades: someone at the top of the lecturer pay bracket can easily have 10-15 years more experience than someone at the bottom. Promotion is usually to Senior Lecturer, and then to Reader and Professor. Nearly all Professors will have started out ...


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I think it is impossible to do the conversion. UK universities don't value students with a foreign bachelor's degree as much as those that obtained one at another UK university. Some universities only accept students with a 110/110 grade, which is much harder to obtain than a First (you only need an average of 70%). They underestimate grades from Dutch ...


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As requested, this is about Computer Science PhDs in the UK. First, how professional life as a PhD student looks like will depend a lot on the supervisor. As such, it is very important to have a chat with them to see whether expectations align - and to understand that expectations go both ways. That said, there are some general features that will typically ...


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First, let me say that this is probably better asked face to face (video call!) with someone in your current institution. You should be able to ask either your tutor or project advisor and they may be able to point you to their PhD student(s) if they have any. They can also say things which are either more related to your past experiences or area you want to ...


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PhDs in the UK are different to their US cousins, so that is something to bare in mind. Specifically, UK PhDs have no coursework, and they have to be finished within 3.5 years, and the have a real exam - the viva voca at the end. Rather than just being superficial these tend to shape the life of a UK PhD student - you come in and are doing 100% research from ...


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I don't generally see much information on the day-to-day life of a PHD student Watch The PhD [Comic] Movies, sure they're make believe, but you can read between the lines


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You're right that the job market is academia is very competitive, across all subjects, not just maths. While raw talent is important to be able to succeed (and by "succeed" I mean get a permanent job in academia -- your definition of success might be different), your publication record is generally more important. The quality and volume of ...


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