New answers tagged

2

This is purely anecdotal, so probably not what OP is looking for, but I think it's interesting... I've fairly frequently applied for academic jobs in the UK both before and after the Brexit referendum. I didn't notice a statistically significant change in my success rate, but I did notice a change in the typical eventual outcome of the recruitment ...


1

If you are applying for a Ph.D. (or an academic job), a strong recommendation letter from someone who is known well by the person making the admission or hiring decision is almost always a very big advantage. It will ensure that your application gets serious consideration, and will give you the edge against similarly-qualified candidates. That said, for M....


2

In my view (and I was MSc admissions officer at some point) recommendation letters at MSc level are largely a tick box exercise. I have admitted more than hundred MSc students and a recommendation letter hasn't made a difference even once. It is fine from my point of view that the student shows they can find somebody professional to recommend them, but as ...


6

I went through exactly the same thing (PhD in France, all publication and thesis in English, diploma in French, I come from a non-English speaking country and don't actually speak French, then applied for a postdoc position in the UK and needed prove my level of English for my immigration documentation). So, the answer is yes you can, but it will (likely) be ...


1

Most universities in the UK get the majority of their income from undergraduate and postgraduate taught students. Even in a research intensive university most research and teaching (R&T) staff spend more time on teaching than on research. It therefore pays to be able to signal that you value teaching. One way to do that is to say that all/x% of your ...


0

At Plymouth University, attaining FHEA is a condition of passing probation for all teaching personnel on a contract of 50% full-time equivalent or more; and attaining AFHEA is a condition of passing probation for all personnel on a contract less than 50% full-time equivalent, but who have at least 15 hours per year of student contact time. Policy here. ...


8

The procedure for complaints and appeals against the decisions of UK Universities is managed by the Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education (known as the OIA). They will only consider your case when you have completed any formal internal processes of the institution and the institution is required to issue you with a "completion of ...


4

In the UK, it is not common for postdocs and entry-level lecturers to negotiate their salaries. This is different from the customs in the USA and some EU countries. In the UK, the starting salary of a postdoc or a lecturer would normally be set up by HR in consultation with postdoc's PI or lecturer's HoD. As a postdoc, if you want a better offer, you have ...


2

It sounds like you are referring to a public university in the U.S., but it isn't particular clear from the question. Universities will generally have some formal or informal means by which one can "appeal" a grading decision (usually by raising an issue with a department chair or a dean), but have extremely broad discretion. If internal ...


2

Read the agreement between your university and the union (presumably UCU) if applicable. It's boring. This defines what you can request. Read benefits information on the HR website. Read visa rules on the government website. Figure out your preferred start date. Estimate your relocation costs. Find out what local taxes are. Find out local housing costs ...


0

Congrats! On top of what you already mentioned, my list contained: Is there an assistant who can help with settling down? Like, helping with housing, taxes, reading payslips. etc. Healthcare. How does it work? When will be available? And everything related. Are there any links to the international community of the university members? Don't over plan, ...


1

This question is mis-phrased. You're really asking: Can a junior researcher, who is not yet recognized as a doctor, be paid simply for doing his/her research? Well the answer is: A researcher must be paid for doing their research - but we have to struggle to enforce that. The problem is, that in some world stats, including the US and the UK, junior ...


1

In addition to the other answers, it should also be mentioned that, in case you go to the US or UK (or somewhere else) for your PhD, you might also be able to get a fellowship from your home country/country of origin in order to pursue your PhD.


7

The ways PhD students in the US are funded can almost certainly fall under one of these categories, though occasionally you'll find them under a different name: TA - Teaching assistant. Paid for teaching/helping with a course. PA - Program/project assistant. Like an RA or TA but for something that's not really research or a course, yet there is funding ...


5

Asking about "the US and the UK" is probably not a great idea because the two countries have very different systems. PhD student funding varies strongly between universities and areas of funding. A lot of departments have their own funds that they pay students from. These come from things like grants and donations so you can have one wealthy ...


9

To elaborate a bit on Charles Bronson's answer, a typical funded PhD position in the UK includes: tuition fee coverage x3 years (around £4500* for UK students and over £10k* for international students). stipend or bursary (the money the student gets) just above £15k* a year (as this is not a salary, and PhD students in the UK are not employed, you get the ...


19

Can a PhD student be paid simply for doing research? Yes, in the US, this is often called "being on fellowship," when the research is your own, and an "RAship" if you are paid to work on another project at a professor's discretion. Fellowships are often prominent national opportunities, but can be funded locally by the university, ...


7

Yes, depending on the scholarship. When I was getting my PhD in the UK (finished a couple of years ago), everyone had a three-year scholarship (minimum wage), and all the teaching was paid separately. Of course, no one had to teach, but, at least in my own case, it was a sure way to get some additional money.


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