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-1

Another option to add to the excellent suggestions by Dawn: Decline to offer a solution — Just say you would think carefully about it: (This method should also be used sparingly.) Sometimes when you get a question about how you would solve a certain problem, the best answer is that you would not solve it by making a snap decision in an interview. Tell the ...


3

Sorry if this starts with jumping into the subject used as your example rather than giving the generic thoughts first - doing this as I feel something useful may be able to be derived from this. I would not try and attract all of "a large body of undergraduate students who are potentially interested in your field of research" to research in that ...


8

If I were in your situation I would have asked for clarification instead of trying to answer right away. In your case, there is ambiguity in what the interviewer meant by successfully attracting [undergraduates] to your field of research Are they talking about undergraduate research projects (your answer seems to assume this)? Or do they mean attracting ...


18

When an interview question is non-standard or otherwise unexpected, I fall back on two types of answers: Reframe the question/your answer more generally. So, if a question is around how you would teach a particular class, you would answer by describing your teaching philosophy or your approach to syllabus design more generally. Often, by the time you have ...


1

Faculty in the US are covered by university policies, their contracts, including a letter of offer of a position, state law, and Federal law. Federal law and any state law specifies a minimum wage. The minimum wage law applies to all employees, including tenured faculty. So yes, there is a minimum wage for them. Some faculty are expected to raise all of ...


2

University managing bodies are rarely committed strongly to academic traditions and ethos, and will gladly chip away both at your tenure - collectively and individually - and your employment conditions, salary and otherwise. Whatever guarantee you may have - if it is not upheld vigorously and in an organized fashion, it will disintegrate and be lost; and ...


8

It depends on the position. Generally, tenure-track and tenured faculty positions with a teaching load are "hard money" - the university is paying you to teach classes, and you will be paid your contract salary, year in and year out, whatever it may be. You have the ability to supplement that salary - most research universities will pay on a "...


12

I think there is no formal guarantee of a minimum salary, but, equally, it is my impression that in the U.S. there are few situations in which faculty have any formal contract whatsoever. For better or for worse. University administrations can unilaterally "furlough" people, or reduce salaries, for whatever reason they wish. As (perhaps not ...


4

While there is probably a minimum for any given institution and you wouldn't be reduced below that for any reason, future salary increases depend most places on performance. There might also be a maximum. The limits might change from year to year, generally moving upwards for various reasons, such as inflation and cost of living. And there are wide ...


0

The best answer may depend on your field of study. My answer may be biased because I am most familiar with the mathematical sciences (including applications and statistics). Also, I'm assuming you're a US citizen and both positions are in the US. Especially if 'PhD candidate' is a euphemism for 'still working on my thesis', then take the post-doc job, finish ...


14

I was in a similar position a couple of years ago. I think departments are aware that they take an unreasonable amount of time to make these decisions and that candidates need to have backup plans. At my department at least, it is common for a successful tenure-track hire to delay their start by a year. In fact, I think most successful hires in our ...


2

When it comes to job searching, even in academia, there are no illusions that your position is permanent. (Not even if it's tenure-track!) At this point, your objective as a postdoc is to qualify for tenure-track offers. So, in my mind, the question is really one of honesty. If you're worried about getting a job at all, then honesty will help you, but it can ...


25

How should I go about negotiating an extension on the postdoc offer You should not. There are two possible outcomes. If you don't get the tenure track job, the extension does you no good. If you do get the tenure track job, the sequence of events will be: You wait four weeks for an interview You wait six more weeks to get an offer You negotiate for a ...


11

These are delicate situations, and there is no definitive answer for how to deal with them. On the one hand it is reasonable to want to progress your career, but it is also costly/annoying to institutions when you accept a position there and then leave shortly afterwards for another position. Ultimately, this will come down to whether or not you are ...


3

The answer is that it can vary considerably. Between being told that you're invited for a first-round interview, and the actual interview itself, it could be a matter of multiple weeks, or just days. Some hiring committees will tell you the names of the people who will be interviewing you (meaning that there's more "preparation" you can do, since ...


9

Unless there is some parallel system specific to the field (they do exist i believe), this is almost certainly a reference to the Research Excellence Framework (REF). https://www.ref.ac.uk/ In brief, every 5 years every department in the UK must submit (2.5 times number of staff) outputs (papers/books etc) for assessment. Every staff member must be an author ...


3

Is it practically possible to rise to the highest ranks of academia in STEM in the US system after finishing a PhD at 34? Definitely! If you mean ``highest rank'' as in Full Professor, it is definitely possible, and 34 for PhD is not late at all. I agree with Buffy's answer, only that I would add that in my experience there are many full professors who got ...


29

Your chances of "rising to the highest ranks" of academia are small. But no different from anyone else, no matter their age at completion of a doctorate. The bar is the difficulty of doing good, publishable, recognized research. True research is delving into the unknown. And it is, well, ... unknown. Additionally, at the moment, the job market is ...


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