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2

This answer reflects a North American perspective at an R1 or R2 university - answers in other parts of the world may be different. If I saw someone who completed a PhD in two years I would want to know things like: What work did they do before their PhD? (Did their prior experience make the PhD faster?) What were the primary contributions of their PhD? (...


1

In many hiring circumstances, committees cannot and will not look at additional letters or any additional documentation that was not specifically asked for. If you send more than the required number or letters you risk having them selected at random, with additional ones tossed in the rubbish can. Your strongest and most relevant letter has a chance, then, ...


1

When reading references committee members evaluate them based on different evaluation criteria. Some place a lot of weight on the worst opinion voiced. In that respect, having more references than needed is a risky prospect. Another point to note is that you’re never 100% sure that all your referees write the most enthusiastic letter possible. For example, ...


1

For both sakes, reaching a Habilitation or being attested "Habilitation equivalence" by a hire committee (either one is mandatory to become a full professor in Germany), you need to show that you have moved on. Papers that do not list your PhD supervisor as a coauthor are considered a strong indicator for this. However, this does not mean that you need to ...


2

Think about your audience. They are asking this question because they want to know how you'll contribute to the teaching of the department. Only listing the title of the course would provide a little information (what you'll teach), but probably not all of what they're listening for (how you'll teach or how your teaching interests will fit in their ...


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It can be an issue, but it is doesn't have to be a large one. If all of your work is joint with senior people, many people will wonder to what extent you contributed to these projects, and to what extent you were just following others. Particularly at top schools, people want to hire leaders in their field, and certainly people who will be productive ...


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Yes, you can go over one page. In fact, most cover letters for faculty searches are 2 pages. Some people go over two pages, but I don’t think it is usually necessary.


4

Hiring committees do care about how many years it’s been since you got your PhD, but they more-or-less don’t care at all about what happened before you received your PhD. I think you’ve misunderstood what people meant by “younger.” I took 7 years in grad school and it caused no issues whatsoever.


3

I think that most places would ignore your age. In some places age discrimination is frowned upon, and can be illegal, though usually for much older applicants. But frowned upon in any case. The few places that might are acting foolishly since it is your accomplishments and likelihood of success that should be the determining factor. If you are in a ...


3

I think you have a few important questions. Foremost, I am assuming you know the language -- to what extent do you know Chinese culture? The transition will be very steep if you do not understand the cultural nuances of all aspects of living and working in China. Indeed, from a Western standpoint, the interactions between students and faculty are much ...


3

Assuming that I understand it now, I do have a suggestion. Given the norms in your field, in which the PI is (I think) a co-author of every paper and who controls the grant and the research, you can't really distinguish yourself without help. But if others speak to your qualities more than you do, it might be enough - or even better. That would be the case ...


4

Each EU country has quite a different academic culture. Some are perceived as being quite insular, with a lot of hiring from within; some are considered "impenetrable" by outsiders; some are quite the opposite and offer significant perks to try to attract top notch scholars from outside. Each system has its quirks and it is impossible to talk about the ...


1

You have focused on a single thing and that alone gives no real indication of possible success. While having a publication would be better, there are other things that will also be taken into consideration in any application. You say you already have a good publication record. You will need good letters of recommendation. You will need some ideas about the ...


3

You should be getting advice about such things from your advisor and/or other experienced colleagues within your academic field. It’s hard for anyone here to make predictions about whether you can get a postdoc based on so little information. In general though, I would say 10 months isn’t such a long time, so if you were in a good position to get a postdoc ...


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