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1

There might be some effect but I'd expect it to be small and easily overcome. If you want a largely research position grades will be mostly irrelevant and you will be judged on the quality (and maybe quantity) of your research. But even if you want a teaching position, you may have some insight into the troubles and travails of students that might serve you ...


22

Being an editor-in-chief is a rewarding position that most departments value on someone's CV. So much for that. But I cannot stress enough how bad an idea it would be to take on such a role while being an assistant professor without tenure. As the EiC, your workload consists of 50% assigning papers to associate editors, and 50% dealing with the difficult ...


2

This depends on what your institution values in its faculty. It also depends on what you would need to give up that might be more important to obtaining tenure. If it comes at the expense of "a few" papers at a place, such as an R1, that highly values papers, the risky. If it comes at the expense of grant proposals at such a place, then risky. &...


1

I though it might be instructive, for insight into how we arrived at the present situation, to look back in history to the days when European universities tried criminal charges against both faculty members and students in their own internal courts (they'd negotiated settlements with their host states, whereby the ordinary criminal courts had no jurisdiction ...


1

They might get a direct offer from another place (free agency model; most common in my experience), they might apply to an advertised position and negotiate to keep some advantages (v.g. tenure), or they might move up and change place via the administrative route and then remain at their new place. Few people change for a worse position if they can avoid it; ...


4

In the US, universities are normally bound by rules that require public announcement of all positions and and open process. You occasionally see announcements in professional academic publications of senior positions. If you think you meet the criteria you can apply. You can also be encouraged to apply by colleagues at your own or other institution. But all ...


2

My UK University just recently started a completely new research lab - they got a very large grant that can support a lot of personnel (academic and admin) for 3 years (at which point they are hoping the lab will become self-sufficient), so they had three senior academic positions to fill. The way they had approached filling the Professor positions (EU ...


1

Usually, they do not. But occasionally, all the possibilities you asked about do happen. As Kimball mentioned, exceptional faculty receive invitations to move, which are usually declined. In some cases, senior faculty change universities by applying for an executive position, which sometimes involves an executive search consulting firm employed by the ...


1

Just as an amplifier on earlier responses: if you don't have threats from him in writing, check out the legality of recording him over the phone. In many jurisdictions such recordings are legal as long as one party knows about them. If he's in a different jurisdiction it's probably trickier: two jurisdiction's rules plus possibly other rules such as US ...


5

Ex-academic here. I would err on the side of caution. I would suggest that you: Investigate your legal options. This does not need to involve your school or telling anyone you work with - you have a right to keep your private life, private. For example is there a small claims court you could access that doesn't involve the school? Get your documentation in ...


0

I'm not an academic. But I think this is not a purely academic issue either. It should not be dealt with by some ethical advisor, senior professor or department head of your university. This is not their job. This is a legal issue. This is blackmail. Make it very clear to your former partner, that you will not tolerate this behaviour. Demand from him to stop ...


15

It is probably worth stating this up front: The relationship you describe has the appearance of an abusive relationship -- and I'm also going to say that I'm sorry you find yourself in this situation :-( Part of abusive relationships are threats that, in many cases, can or will not actually be realized. While I don't know for sure, my best guess is that your ...


11

There are three entangled issues here: an issue of personal relationship gone wrong, your former partner not allowing you to collect your personal items and not returning the money you paid for his trip; an issue of tenure which potentially gives your former partner some power over your future career; an issue with him being in a relationship with you when ...


0

Why were faculty allowed to vote on deciding their own tenure? Presumably the dean didn't sanction the vote, which is why they are denying requests. I don't understand why any university would invite faculty to award themselves tenure. Tenure is a form of promotion, granted by universities, not by faculty.


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