New answers tagged

1

Advise the researcher of their options beyond their current trajectory, discuss the differences between trajectories, and establish what they really want. (Just because a research says they, want a permanent academic position in five years and professorship ten years after, doesn't mean they've thoroughly considered and understood what this will entail!) The ...


10

Honestly, without putting down. Explain the weaknesses of their approach or profile, explain what they would have to change in your opinion to get where they want and explain what they can do if it does not work this way. The point is not discouragement, but letting them understand what their options are. Some people are able to rise far above their ...


1

I think you're free to give a talk on any topic that you think is relevant to the audience. I've given several seminars while visiting other institutions and assist with organising them at our institute. The topic of a talk is rarely stipulated, although a speaker is usually expected to give a title or abstract ahead of time to promote the talk. You can ...


5

Another possible aspect of the situation is that the invitation to speak at the seminar is a way to fund a short visit on your part, in which you could discuss more with that professor. If that is the case, the topic of your talk wouldn't necessarily need to be the same as you discussed.


18

As a courtesy to your audience and potential audience, as well as the professor, make sure the topic of your talk is accurately established well in advance. It is frustrating to go to a talk that is not on the stated topic and does not interest me, and to miss a talk that would have interested me if I had known what it was about. I suggest discussing topic ...


3

I think this depends on who the audience for your talk is. Maybe he invited you because he wanted to hear some more about this particular topic and possibly have some joint research come out of it. The audience in that case would be his research group. If on the other hand this is a general seminar for his entire department it would be perfectly acceptable ...


37

If you haven't come to an agreement on what you would discuss, then I think you are pretty free. But as a courtesy, if nothing else, send him a note about your topic. If he disagrees you might want to re-think it. However, a talk about partially unformed ideas, if presented that way can be very valuable. It can give ideas about research the listeners might ...


1

I think the problem is that you "misunderstand" the sections, and whether that is right or wrong, you have to change that perception. I have a PI with a similar problem, and she decided to resubmit and "play along". R01s are hard to get funded when you're new. Plan on that -- average age of new PIs in the 40s -- not 30s. That said, I would say if you ...


2

If you're interested in research, whether in academia or in industry, then getting a PhD is definitely worth the effort. The time when a PhD was only for people who want an academic career finished a long time ago, there's plenty of people who do a PhD without even considering academia as a career, and even more people who eventually decide to go to industry ...


5

Having a PhD or other Research Doctorate will definitely help you with many large companies. At some companies there is a fairly large gap between what someone with a degree can do and earn and someone without. "Senior Scientist" may only be open to PhD holders for example. Moreover, some companies really need people on the cutting edge of research. Think ...


32

Do you have a colleague or someone else you can ask who is an expert in the field you need? It is possible that with expertise in the area the reviews are very minor and a one hour talk with the right person will enable you to do whatever the reviewer suggested. Even if some of the reviewers ideas do take a lot of work this should enable you to satisfy some ...


22

This is perhaps just stating the obvious, but whether or not your paper gets published isn't up to the referee. It's up to the editor. So if you received a generally positive referee's report then you can just tell the editor that the requested revisions are outside the intended scope of the paper and decline to make them. The only way I could see this ...


24

When you get minor revisions, you should definitely go for it. That's not that I say "go for it under any circumstance", so if you had to invest months of work, I would probably vote differently. But be aware that if you get a minor revision, you do not necessarily have to comply with all the remarks. In many cases the editor does not even send the revision ...


0

I wish I could offer you more here, but the only way forward is for you to talk to your supervisor about all of this. That is what she is there for. Until you have spoken her about how you are feeling you don't know what your options truly are.


0

Consider forming a small study group with a few of the other students with whom you feel at least a bit of comfort. It may well be that others feel as you do, and a group in which to discuss issues, both technical and otherwise, can be good fro all of you. Three or four people is enough. If it is too big it will be less useful. It can also become a long term ...


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