New answers tagged

3

I'll guess you have done about all you can other than send a final notice very close to the deadline. The prof is probably targeting that "drop dead" date and continuous reminders may just get in the way. But a note on the next to last day would be good. You might also start to think about other options. Who else might be able to do this for you?


1

This question is too broad to answer. Many PIs will not hire a postdoc without strong letters of reference. On the other hand some PIs will not care. Although I suspect in this case you would have to be an obviously very strong researcher. (Even though personally I find it hard to believe that references wouldn't be asked for. Even if you're a star ...


2

Many universities have mandatory requirements for letters of recommendation (LoR) for a postdoc position, and that's the main reason they ask you to submit LoR. There were some PI who interviewed me told me this and also told me that they wouldn't even care what my referees would write about me. They were willing to hire me immediately after they have three ...


0

You should not be sending this in the first place. It should be sent directly by the referee. In North America no reputable institution would accept a letter of reference from anyone if this letter were sent through the applicant.


0

Most application have the fields for Recommender information within the application itself. In these cases, it's not necessary to additionally include it on the letter. If you're still not sure write to the university. They usually get back in a day or two.


0

Actually, it isn't an either/or thing. It can and should be both. You should try to keep in touch with your advisor, keeping them up to date on what you are doing. But the reason is that you want them to remember you when it comes time for recommendations and not have to search their memory for something good to say about you. You don't have to socialize ...


2

You might increase your chances if you find another recommender that can say better things about you. Ideally, someone with whom you already did an internship or project, who would better know how you do research. If you have not worked on any internship/project yet, it might still be better to ask a professor from a course in which you got a better grade. ...


0

I'm applying for master programs and the 16 selections are range from dream to match to safe, with about five in each category. Please for simplicities' sake, choose your top one out of each category, and save yourself so much time and stress. That would be 3 recommendation letters. If you must, add 1 or 2 backups and have a max of 5 needed letters. If ...


1

I plan to apply approximately 16 schools and wondering whether they're too many for my recommendation letter providers...It's happened before that a professor of my friend regretted to provide all letters for him because they're too many. You needn't necessarily require a letter to support each application (unless that's strictly required). You may be able ...


-1

Consider how long it will take for your professor to write one great recommendation letter for you. Next, consider how much time it might take your professor to produce 16 fantastic recommendation letters for you. Most people will do a fairly awful job if they feel they are being undervalued or asked to serve unreasonable requests. That you are asking the ...


6

Unlike the other answers, I do not think the professor's time spent customizing is an issue. Customizing a letter does not take that long. Professors have lots of practice. Submitting it can take longer due to low quality submission systems. But writing the first letter is most of the work. The issue is that only one of these letters is worth submitting:...


1

I have written in the past the following kinds of email: Dear Professor X, I would like to thank you for giving your valuable time and efforts in writing a number of recommendation letters for my post-graduate applications at various universities. The applications are now complete and I am hoping for some good news. Sincerely, Coder


1

On german universities it is in general not a good idea to give any presents to professors. We frequently get mails that we are not allowed to take any present which has an approximate value of more than 20 Euro. I would assume that this is handled similar in different countries, since this counts as bribery. My best guess would be to write a nice, friendly ...


-1

Inform your university’s disability office. They should be able to handle things appropriately. In most OECD countries, there is a law prohibiting discrimination against individuals with disabilities, and obligating workplaces and schools to provide reasonable adjustments. As a result, the universities in those countries will have equity offices who should ...


0

No, nobody needs to know. Your letter writers need to attest to your academic abilities, whereas your medical history is not something they need to know nor do they have any business telling anyone else about it. As a matter of fact, all that ought to matter are your academic abilities. The fact that you're applying for graduate school implies to me that ...


50

As other people have mentioned, the problem with 16 schools is that a professor cannot, either truthfully or operationally provide customized letters to 16 different schools. By "customization" I mean more than changing the name of the school and program. Good letters of rec use professor's familiarity with their field to speak to applicants' specific ...


33

Tell your professor of your plan to apply to 16 schools, and let them decide if it’s too much. They are capable of making their own decisions without you doing that on their behalf. It’s nice of you to worry about the professor’s well-being, but unnecessary, and counterproductive if it ends up undermining your own success. And as for the professor ...


3

You can ask him, of course. But the problem with asking for too many is that you will get a general letter sent to all, rather than a letter tailored to each given position. I realize this is hard if all schools have similar deadlines, but if possible you should spread it out over time, with your professor's OK. You can also have a different professor ...


3

Use a different referee, time is now not on your side and she did not plan to be sick. If she is not capable of replying to emails she might be very sick so have some respect. You might consider sending her reference late with a note of explanation but I suggest you send the initial application fully complete. Many times the first stage of the sorting ...


4

I cannot imagine getting in a top program without reasonable letters of recommendation, and I see this as much more important than having a published paper especially as in a previous post you wrote “ However, the only issue in my doctoral applications is apparently the loathness of almost all of the university teachers who know me to write a letter of ...


9

To add to @Buffy’s answer, in all math graduate programs I’m aware of, at least in the US, letters of recommendation are a requirement. So a “lack of letters of recommendation” is actually a guarantee that you will not get admitted. This is not something you can solve by publishing either one “simple” paper, or even many non-simple ones, except in the ...


-3

I am pretty sure the answer is no. There are very few things that can guarantee admission to a top tier school. Some of the things that can get near guarantee a the top of my head, A faculty willing to work with you. A very strong research background that admission board can recognize its strength. Big dollar donations (this is true of undergrad admissions, ...


4

Nothing guarantees admission at top-tier universities. Sorry. It doesn't work like that. The competition is fierce. But note that the expectations for entry into any doctoral program vary by country. In the US, a doctoral program normally starts with coursework leading to the comprehensive exams. So less (in the CV) is likely to be required on entry. Other ...


4

About the interview part. It is true that mathematical skill can be determined by an interview. Also the language skills can be somewhat determined by an interview. The truth is that interviewing each candidate would take a lot of time. Even scheduling interviews for every single candidate would be a mess. Same for reading previous publications / thesises. ...


8

Most universities want some independent advice about candidates. This should come from people who know the candidate and can attest to their suitability and likely successful outcome. It is hard to gauge that with material provided only by the candidate, even in an interview. And there is more to graduate school (or a job, for that matter) than raw ...


-1

Ask the professors who know you very well and can speak of your ability to succeed in the program. P.S. I got into the grad program I wanted. I had 2 LoR from the field and 1 from non-field. The strongest letter would come from my non-field professor who knows very well about my work ethic and passion, and what I can bring into the program.


1

Something like Colleague might work. Something like "informal advisor". It depends a bit on how much room you have to detail it, as well as the closeness of the relationship. If the person has a good, independent, reputation, then something like that should do fine. At some future point you might be asked to expand on it.


1

I think your experience in industry will appeal to master's degree admission committees. Your application/cv should describe your technical skills. Get letters from your coworkers that speak to your competence with them and your ability to learn. . Your cover letter can talk briefly about your health problems as an undergraduate. I don't know whether the ...


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