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3

Ask the professor to send the letter to the translator with instructions to return it back to the professor. Make separate arrangements to pay the translator. Then the prof can directly send the translation. And the prof can even verify it a bit if needed. You don't need to be in the document loop at all.


0

Do I have any good angle here? That depends on what you want to achieve and how long you’re willing to take to achieve it. Fortunately, one of those people is Professor X (they contacted me unexpectedly saying that they liked my work, having evidently seen my code-in-progress). Great, right? Is taking a short-term appointment with X an option? That will ...


0

You'd have to check the case of your specific school and country. At least here in Chile, by law everything a student creates as part of their classes belongs to the school. Sure, they'll probably be generous in their relation with you, but you must at very least talk to them.


1

If your results depend on some property of the quicksort algorithm, for example on its typical or worst-case performance, then you should cite a paper that demonstrates that the algorithm has those properties. For example if you deliberately chose an algorithm that works well when the data is already sorted, it might be best to cite some paper that compares ...


1

Do I have to cite common CS algorithms? Generally, and in a thesis, yes. Why? You may consider it common, others may not; not everyone is in the same sub-field of Computer Science. You may be using a variant of the algorithm which is less ubiquitous; or a specific implementation, as @WBT suggests. If you're using terms from the definition or specification ...


6

I'll take what appears to be a surprisingly contrarian position on this: Yes, you need to cite the implementation you used, in a scientific paper. It is far too common that scientists working elsewhere trying to reproduce results fail to do so, and waste a lot of time trying to make sure their setups and steps are just the same as what they're trying to ...


10

"Quicksort" today rarely refers to the 1961 version; the algorithm has been improved since then. If you're going to cite, you should of course cite something that's relevant to your thesis. As others stated, if you just needed an algorithm to get things sorted, that doesn't need citing. But if your thesis did depend on the details of sorting, then is ...


3

No, if the algorithm has a well-known name that means that it is assumed that you are not the author and that readers can get familiar by using that name as a reference. In a similar way when you are writing a math paper, you don't need to create a reference every time you use terms like Hamel basis, Lagrangian, Gaussian distribution, Fourier transform, etc.,...


27

If the specific use of the algorithm is important to the work, then you should cite what specifically you used or implemented, and also citing the broadest/oldest class of algorithms would be strictly optional. Using the example of quicksort, there are many dozens of varieties of it that have the same general idea but have different characteristics and ...


56

Do I have to cite common CS algorithms? No. The fact that it was first published [in] 1961 isn't relevant, you needn't cite it because it is [widely] used and [well-]known by almost anyone in the CS world. That said, although a citation isn't necessary, you can provide one at your discretion. Such a citation is probably more important for a final thesis ...


1

A PhD is a first and foremost a research degree. Having some research experience will be much better than a whole bunch more bachelor's level classes. Instead of doing a double bachelor's, spend that time doing research during your MS degree. Having a published journal or conference paper will probably go a lot further in an application than a double BS


6

In mathematics it is extremely common for people to post their papers to the arXiv before submitting them to a journal. The idea is that this allows them to get feedback on their paper before making the submission. For instance, several of my collaborators have posted all of their papers to the arXiv. Moreover, I have never heard of a journal not accepting a ...


6

If you were reviewed and accepted, signed the appropriate forms, paid to attend the conference, and presented in an IEEE conference, then you should expect to be included in the proceedings. If you aren't, then most likely it is a result of a mistake, and can be corrected by contacting the conference publications chair. The publications chair of the ...


2

The dominant cost of attending most conferences is not the conference fee but the travel costs (e.g., airfare + hotel). Moreover, most conferences (including most ACM and IEEE conferences) offer a reduced rate for student attendees, often half or less of the rate for professors. If you cannot afford that lesser rate for students, you probably cannot afford ...


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