New answers tagged

2

Its hard to make generalizations due to the varying selectivity of programs. That said, there are a finite number of first-round offers any graduate program can make. In our department, if we ‘spent’ one on a candidate who then decided not to take it, we would probably hesitate to accept them the next time. That said, a few years later the people reviewing ...


5

Admissions committee in strong CS PhD programs are primarily looking for concrete evidence of research potential. Neither GRE scores nor the ability to take lots of undergraduate classes provide that compelling evidence. Fortunately for you, a first-author CVPR paper and strong recommendation letters would! Given your research record and the likely ...


3

I will answer specifically for the German system, as that is one of the two countries the OP expressed interest in in the comments. To enroll in a German PhD programme, you need the agreement of a professor to supervise you and (typically) an MSc in a related subject with (often) grades exceeding some threshold. Only the overall grade on your MSc certificate ...


0

This isn't my field (and I'm in the US), but I think it would depend on the program as well as the individual advisor. It's probably best to contact potential advisors beforehand and address the circumstances. If every other aspect of your resume is stellar and you just had one bad semester due to your life problems, then you'll probably get in somewhere. ...


1

If you have a poor academic record, it is bound to have an impact on your chances to admitted to a good PhD program. But, in life, bad the things happen, sometimes due to life and sometimes due to mistakes. If I tell you that it is impossible for you to get admission to a PhD program, would you stop trying? That would be one more mistake in your life. There ...


5

Folks answering on this site may have a bias towards publishing, so let's talk about this in a way which abstracts from the paper a bit. Getting a job requires: Demonstrating an ability to get things done. The ability to talk about the things you have done. Getting parts of your undergrad work published provides evidence that you can get things done. ...


3

In such a case, I would not just apply, but talk to the faculty or institute before. Find out (e.g. through the website) who is responsible for the Master program and contact them. Give an overview about what you have done in your undergrad studies and ask them if admission is possible. It may also be the case that you can get admission with additional ...


2

I'll assume you intend to study in the US. It might be a bit different elsewhere. From the sound of it, you are a good and eager student, interested in opportunities. If your record is good, generally, and you get good letters of recommendation from professors, then you are competitive. However, there is a lot of competition, and the higher up you go in ...


7

For me, this, like so many questions, has a simple answer. If you are not sure about something, ask the person involved. In this case that person would be your professor. You need to know the level of commitment required of you. Here is my suggestion (to be put in your own words of course). Thank you for your email/whatever, Thank you so much for all your ...


8

As an engineer, who has never worked in academia, I would recommend doing it with a limit on your time commitment. It is a great CV enhancer, much of engineering is writing and communicating. This will be especially important if you strike out on your own. The skills to be a good engineer are not the same as the skills to be a good freelancer. Most ...


1

Generally speaking, if your advisor asks you to do something reasonable and relevant (which co-authoring a paper is), you should do it. Although this is especially good advice pre-degree, it also applies post-degree. My own advisor wanted me to take his advice after I obtained my PhD. Things like good references may depend upon it. This is simply respect ...


3

On co-authorship I would suggest to have a look what co-authorship means and implies first, and this is not uniquely defined everywhere. Example of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors Some golden standards are in the so-called Vancouver Recommendations, in full Recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing, and Publication of ...


7

If you're looking for an unbiased expert opinion on whether the hours you'd have to put in are worth it, you're looking in the wrong place. A publication is valued in academia, but is it equally valued in the career path you envision? Though a publication will undoubtedly improve your CV, the time spent on it could have been spent on activities that improve ...


11

Others have already mentioned the benefits in terms of CV enhancement and similar, but there also are some direct benefits for a non-academic career: You get experience with communicating your results, be it in writing or public speaking (should you present at that conference). In particular you have the opportunity to get insight into the process of ...


38

Would there be anything to gain from doing this if I don't intend to pursue a career in academia? Of course! You can put it in your CV. You might not need it for whatever job you're going for (are you sure you don't?), but you still have a rare opportunity that's worth bragging about which you give up by declining. Remember, the future is uncertain, and ...


16

It may be fine for the professor to write the paper without your cooperation, but NOT so fine to omit you as a co-author if the work is yours. You should be a co-author, though need not contribute further to the project. A co-author need not be involved in every aspect of a publication. If you created it, you are rightfully an author. It isn't the "...


23

This focuses on the first part of the question, i.e., whether there could be anything to gain from writing the paper. The other answers cover the second part. Some industry jobs in computer science require or prefer applicants to have a master’s or PhD degree, or some research experience. If you wish to apply for such jobs now or in the future, a paper could ...


78

Congratulations! In my opinion, it is perfectly polite to write back and say that you are interested, but can't afford to make a significant time commitment to the project. Ideally, the professor will be happy to do the work himself, and your role would largely be to look over the finished product, sign off on it, and make suggestions or comments. It's fine ...


0

I coordinate graduation projects in our department, thus I have quite a bit of experience in this. These things happen. It is normal. It happens to the better or worse students. If you are certain your mental situation is really tied to this mess, then it is the symptom. In this case it is easier to treat the issue then to treat the symptom. But just to make ...


0

As others have suggested, step 1 is to address your mental health with a professional. That doesn't mean you'll feel better instantly: it means you'll have a place of support and some reality checking and some assistance monitoring how you're doing. Step 2 is re-establishing a relationship with your advisor (or a new one). This type of project is supposed to ...


0

I looks to me like you are overly ambitious regarding the goals you have set for your dissertation project. Modern C++ is a large and complex language with unsafe memory handling, thus offering you more than enough rope to hang yourself. In addition, OpenGL also offers a large and complex API, requiring you to understand the intricacies of dividing the ...


0

Honestly, a BS project isn't expected to be great or even functional. It's expected to demonstrate problem solving methodology and show some results. I would argue your problem is that to even show any result involves a lot of boiler-plate coding which you seem to be having problems with. What exactly are you trying to do?


19

Your first and main source for help and advice on this should be your supervisor. Working in industry I went through a high stress phase when I tended to cry during meetings with my boss. He was a very courteous person, and ignored my crying except for moving a box of tissues next to where I was sitting. Depending on your supervisor, you may need to bring ...


7

You have to speak with your supervisor / course mentor / Head of Department as any solution will have to be within the course regulations. We cannot suggest a solution as we don’t have the regulations for your course so you have to reach out to them.


0

In my experience, this situation is pretty common, so even if the advisor/promoter aren't happy about it, they likely have dealt with this situation before. I think you can let your guilt go for now. The best course of action is simply to acknowledge the lateness without dwelling on it, and try and resume normal communications going forward. I think you know ...


0

I do not know about univ. of Toronto but in general, if you are full fee-paying student universities usually accept you as a PhD student more easily compared to the ones who rely on funding/scholarships. Since your wife has already done (almost) her PhD I am sure you know about the requirements for application etc. As mentioned in another answer getting in ...


3

The cs.LG category has a broader scope. As per arXiv's category taxonomy, the category descriptions are: stat.ML (Machine Learning) - Classification, Graphical Models, High Dimensional Inference and cs.LG (Machine Learning) - Papers on all aspects of machine learning research (supervised, unsupervised, reinforcement learning, bandit problems, and so on) ...


0

You may want to reach out to a professor ahead of time and inquire if they’re going to be accepting students during the period you wish to apply. It’s by no means a sure fire way to get in, because you could be beaten out by competition, but it’s a good start. Apart from that, you’d be best to get all of the documents together on time and submit it before ...


1

Clearly. The main purpose of a bibliography entry is to properly identify the work, with enough information that (at least in principle) your readers can find the work and read it for themselves. If the github.io repository doesn't suggest a citation format, make up something reasonable that serves that purpose. The precise formatting doesn't matter (or if ...


0

If your paper is already into Google Scholar, it id easy, anyway, eventually, it will (if not yet). You can cite like the following example: Robertson, Eric, et al. "Manipulation Data Collection and Annotation Tool for Media Forensics." Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Workshops. 2019. Additionally, ...


0

There are a couple of methods to do this. I detail all 4 methods here https://medium.com/a-academic-librarians-thoughts-on-open-access/4-ways-to-find-review-papers-systematic-reviews-meta-analysis-and-other-rich-sources-of-82898aebb6e7 Use built-in filters that exist in databases like Pubmed, Scopus, Web of Science. However these tend to have somewhat ...


1

As requested, this is about Computer Science PhDs in the UK. First, how professional life as a PhD student looks like will depend a lot on the supervisor. As such, it is very important to have a chat with them to see whether expectations align - and to understand that expectations go both ways. That said, there are some general features that will typically ...


1

First, let me say that this is probably better asked face to face (video call!) with someone in your current institution. You should be able to ask either your tutor or project advisor and they may be able to point you to their PhD student(s) if they have any. They can also say things which are either more related to your past experiences or area you want to ...


1

PhDs in the UK are different to their US cousins, so that is something to bare in mind. Specifically, UK PhDs have no coursework, and they have to be finished within 3.5 years, and the have a real exam - the viva voca at the end. Rather than just being superficial these tend to shape the life of a UK PhD student - you come in and are doing 100% research from ...


1

I don't generally see much information on the day-to-day life of a PHD student Watch The PhD [Comic] Movies, sure they're make believe, but you can read between the lines


1

I'd say this is psychological assault. When someone attacks your fundamentals in such a way it tends to be part of a manipulative scheme, whether to dissuade you from doing something or to goad you into doing something. This kind of unprovoked cruelty usually aims to overwhelm your defenses so to speak. You should ask yourself what might the other person ...


4

Maybe if the aim was to be completely pure, then this would be considered a conflict of interest. However, it's unlikely that your advisor would have any role in the reviewing of papers, though I suppose it is theoretically possible he could put unfair pressure on the program committee. In fact, it is quite common for conferences to allow authors to submit ...


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