New answers tagged

1

It is quite natural. Note that there is no reason to learn anything in a PhD if you do not think you should use it. In my experience, the first step when facing a problem that is of a scale or complexity where automation is useful, is to find whether there are standard tools for this, ask you supervisor and your colleagues, and if not, make it yourself. When ...


2

I wanna add a bit to Jeroens answer. With you having majored in Math and not CS you will of course not have as much insight into the practical work of a CS-major, so will need to (re)learn more than your peers. You can still succeed but it might not be as easy for you. I wanna go into a bit more detail regarding the list of examples you provided us with: I ...


5

Given your background and the info you provided in your comment, this means that you are likely spending more time on this than your peers. This doesn't mean you are 'less capable', as you put it, but simply that you need to learn this aspect first before you will be able to make decent progress in your CS research. Your peers may already know this and will ...


0

Look for a supervisor! If you already have published papers, you may have an idea of the specific problems you want to work on. So you may know which are the big names out there in the field, and who authored publications that you liked. Jot down a list of names, read about their work, then ask them for a meeting to present yours and to ask for opportunities....


0

You should not spend too much time with a professor that does not indicate a commitment, at least verbally. This was the mistake I made assuming the professor will take me as his student, but professors easily change their minds. This happened to me. After one year, my funding was discontinued and all the blame of not finding an advisor was put on me by the ...


3

Taking on a PhD student is a serious, multi year commitment that many professors would not make before getting to know the student and gaining an appreciation for their abilities and personality, for example by having them do a research project under the professor’s supervision for a semester. By contrast, having a couple of meetings with a student, ...


1

There's no standard process for this. I strongly suggest you talk to your director of graduate studies first to get a sense of the approximate process, not just for the issue of declaration of PhD advisor, but the whole process of completing the PhD program. Most PhD programs are not very formal when it comes to "declaration of PhD advisor", until ...


0

In the US it is actually typical for a student to start without having a dissertation advisor. Often they have an academic advisor who can answer questions about coursework and general progress until they are replaced with a dissertation advisor. Usually (maybe not universally) the advisor signs the dissertation when it is done and probably participates in ...


3

There is no single definition of what being an advisor means and entails. The one common thing is, well, the advising part. Apart from that, advisors don't have to do anything (this might depend on the country, at least in Germany being an official PhD advisor means first and foremost just that, all the rest is optional). So from what it sounds like your ...


2

No, it isn't going to hurt. Research that is published is not going to hurt any application in the US. It is going to help. And, collaboration is a valued skill in CS so that, too, is in your favor. Even unpublished research mentioned by a letter writer is a plus. All such things are indicators of future success. And get the supervising professor to write a ...


2

You should probably inform the editor that you have found errors that don't (dramatically?) affect the results and can clean them up in a future revision. Don't withdraw the paper, I suggest. Let the editor decide what is sensible to do. They may be fine to let the process continue. But if reviewers flag the error it might be worse in the end.


0

This isn't a problem for US doctoral study. The process is long, and it normally involves coursework that you can use to refocus. Relatively few US doctoral applicants have much if any serious research background as the US undergraduate education system doesn't provide enough specialization or time to do it. Get good letters from people who can attest to ...


1

I can get through the abstract and some basic introduction but I find myself really lost as I progress through the paper. To read a research paper you need to have (1) the relevant background and (2) you need time and patience. If you are totally lost, then I suspect your background for reading those papers might be insufficient. This is very different from ...


2

First, don't expect a hard boundary between the two concepts. It is a matter of more or less of one or the other. So, the "exactly" in your title can only be approximated. While research in industry is now only occasionally anything beyond product research, it wasn't always that way. Some places still do research much like is done in academia. And ...


0

Your advisor has fallen into the trap of thinking there is a significant difference between academic and industrial/product thinking. The truth is that there is a continuum between the two and that little good comes from the lofty or pretentious imposition of bipolarity on that continuum. Such academic stereotyping often indicates unwillingness to apply one'...


0

Any research experience is helpful when applying to a graduate program. Generally I would definitely mention this experience in my SOP, as it is useful for showing that you have research experience (even better if it is related in some way). A research proposal is for the research that you intend to conduct once you have begun your graduate studies. ...


-2

You are a post-doc, as per your job. "But I am not a doctor yet" I hear you protest. Irrelevant. You have entered the post-doctoral employment stage, and that makes you a post-doc. You did get the job on the basis of the expectation that you will resolve this paradox within a year or so.


2

You are correct that the top universities may be out of reach, but that is more a matter of number of applicants than anything. But joining a doctoral program in US with only a bachelors is the, by far, typical situation. And most students have little if any research experience at that point. So, in that regard you are more or less typical. In fact, I'm ...


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