New answers tagged

1

There exists research positions in the UK for people with an MSc but no PhD, which are not necessarily meant for acquiring a PhD while employed. Such positions are rare however, and definitely not a natural stepping stone on the way to a PhD. I suspect that the pay of these positions will be insufficient by itself to make you count as "highly skilled ...


6

As someone who has sat on multiple admissions committees at the PhD level, any sort of peer-reviewed publication is viewed highly positively in the decision-making process. That said, undergraduate-focused journals are viewed as having a lower barrier to entry relative to regular (non-UG focused) journals, which is a proxy for the strength of the findings ...


3

In the US, everything counts. So, yes, it would be a positive thing to do this and list it on your CV if accepted. Graduate admissions (doctoral) is very broad based and takes in to account many things. What a committee is looking for is clear evidence of the high likelihood of success of admitted students. Doing undergraduate research is a definite plus and ...


0

It will depend strongly on the specific tasks you are involved in. In most labs there will be the local guru who can get you started if you are nice to him. And on most large projects there will be several such gurus. HEP experimental is going to, naturally, have a big hardware component. If you can repair, diagnose, build, or install some kind of electronic ...


4

I'll answer from the cosmology perspective, though probably a lot of this applies to hep-ex as well. You should aim to have a good working knowledge of Python as that is the lingua franca in cosmology. Additionally, it's useful to be familiar with either Fortran or C, as some of the larger numerical cosmology codes such as CAMB and CLASS are written in those....


2

"Under review" is better than "Pending" or "In progress". I would include them, but be clear. In some cases, it is appropriate to list the journal because there was a review and there are comments to address, in other cases, if you submit and have gotten nothing back, I'd recommend just listing "Under review".


32

I don't see any reason not to contact the authors of the other paper, though it is possible that nothing can be done for an already published paper. But the conversation with them might be useful to everyone. I, personally, would thank them for alerting you to a problem with the published algorithm, giving you the opportunity/incentive to make a correction. ...


3

Ph.D. programs look for one main thing: Research. Have you conducted research in CS during your Master's degree, and did you present a paper in a conference? This will make a significantly more positive impact on your profile, than the negative impact of poor grades. Further, your poor grades were during your B.Sc degree. You have since completed a Master's ...


2

I can't speak much for the US, mainly Europe. From my understanding the professors are frequently not too much interested in your grades (particularly in maths/CS). It is more important that you show that you looked at that professor's research. That you are interested in the research ideas conducted at that chair, that you understand the implications of ...


1

Do you have programs of interest? I am kind of wondering the same thing (though I do plan on applying this cycle), however at the stage the US is at in the pandemic (presumably, where you would be planning to do your PhD in), it is more likely to vary from school/department to school/department. Some universities may waive the GRE altogether on a permanent ...


0

While there is no standard, there are some style guidelines for pseudo code as appendix from publications like this or that, or from courses.


3

The issue is not just the "audience", but rather the "visibility". Any venue - be it a journal or a conference - has some specific topics that define the "expected audience" of the people that will read the articles published within it. However, in conferences you know in advance that at least N people will look at your work, ...


-1

Specifically on CS, as far as I know, the knowledge develops quite fast. Submitting it to a journal can take some time, but to a conference you can discuss it with the community much faster.


0

It might be true for some subfields in CS (like AI, ML, DS, CV, NLP, etc) because if we compare an A* journal with an A* conference: A* conference does not accept papers just because they are novel but also because they are at the top xx% -according to the judgement of the reviewers, which is most of the time subjective-. For example, if you submit a good ...


2

This sounds like machine learning, where the result of training a model (often neural networks trained with gradient descent) are known to depend on the random initialization of the network parameters. A quick google search will help you find much more details. Just re-run the training multiple times with different random seeds (you should manually set them ...


1

More context would be helpful. It is possible that your result is simulation-based (such as a bootstrap CI, simulated permutation test, or simulated P-value for a chi-squared test with sparse cell counts). Then the referee may wonder whether results are affected by your particular simulation. In that case, you might (a) show the seed (and software) for the ...


3

No, it is not necessary to justify the W on your transcript; however, it could be useful to address it indirectly. I took a course in Artificial Intelligence (AI) Course and had to withdraw from it as I could not manage the workload due to several other courses which were somewhat difficult. Self-assessing your limits is a valuable skill. You withdrew from ...


2

If this is the sort of thing you focus your SoP on you are making a big mistake - missing an opportunity. Your SoP should be about the future; your plans, goals, and how you intent to achieve them. Wasting words on 'splaining old stuff won't get you accepted. The CV and transcripts are about the past. The SoP is about the future. Only bring up the past for ...


1

No, you don't need to explain this as it's just a single course on your transcript. It's pretty common to have one W; it does not reflect badly on a student unless it's multiple courses over multiple semesters.


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