New answers tagged

5

In short, your premises are wrong. Professors read papers to learn. Professors meet with their peers, both at conferences and informally, and learn from them. Professors do learn from their research students. These are slow methods of learning, but over many years they add up. Further, in fast-moving fields of research, nobody "keeps up" in the ...


3

Here is how it used to work: The university bought journal articles from a publisher. The publisher printed and mailed the article to the university. Any random person could walk into the university library and read the article. The random person could use what they learned to make money, so long as they did not violate any patents. The patents issue is ...


0

I approach the ethics of this question in terms of society membership. If a person is a serious member of a research community, they should be helping to support that community in a number of ways, including paying money to help support the publications maintained by its research societies. Universities generally both support societies and provide access by ...


0

This should be worked out with your advisor. If it were me (as advisor), I'd suggest that you explain the original methodology and show how your work implies that it fails. That is a valid research outcome. Then, show how a modification of it would work and why. How is it that the "technical details" make a difference. But if you change the ...


2

The main thing you are missing is the "Big Deal" model that publishers use with university libraries (pioneered by Elsevier). The basic way that this works is that you pay one price for all the journal you get from a given publisher, and this price is based on the previous price you paid plus a certain increase each contract. You can change what ...


2

That's an interesting example of two different Nash equilibria. If all top journals in a field allow to publish preprints, then one journal/publisher disallowing it would simply lead to no-one publishing there. If the norm is to forbid it, then one journal allowing it will probably just decrease its revenue (it would attract more good papers, but that's not ...


0

None of the missing skills you mention strike me as "seriously underqualified". Those are tools that you can learn reasonably quickly. You can learn C++ and Python, and you can learn machine learning algorithms and try them out. This will not take you longer than a couple of months. The important thing is that you are an expert in your field: that ...


1

Adding to some of the other answers. Many grants now require that works supported by said grants be freely available in some form. This is the famous “open-access” debate about people paying to access research paid for by government (and thus tax-payers) monies. NOT allowing this would mean fewer submissions. Overall, pre-prints etc don’t seem to be much ...


0

I will try my best to simply the definition: Robustness analysis takes into account uncertainty or non precision in model parameters (Things a model takes in) to produce decisions that are more robust (strong and healthy), basically behave better under uncertainty. (I hope this helps, I know it is still kind of confusing but I hope you can get what I am ...


0

You might want to start here: https://papersowl.com/blog/research-paper-format Although you will likely want to learn Latex if you are writing serious papers: https://www.overleaf.com/learn/latex/Creating_a_document_in_LaTeX In general the format might depend on the journal you are submitting to and if they accept your paper they will usually let you know ...


7

What am I missing? That we are the geese who are laying golden eggs for the publishers. Their business model is to do little and to get paid huge sums of money for it. Scientists do essentially all the work: the writing, peer review, and the editorial work. All that publishers really do is copyediting, and quite frankly they often do a mediocre job of that. ...


8

Short answer: Pre-prints are not a big threat to the business models of journals and there are scientific norms that mean that journals are expected to permit pre-prints. Longer Answer: Why do universities and others pay for journals when some of the articles in these journal subscriptions are available via pre-print servers and other means? Readers want ...


1

How to sell my current solution to my advisor? Just tell your supervisor what you've told us. (Using more positive language will help you.) Before you do: ask yourself whether the subdomain (for which your solution works) is interesting. Will others use your solution? (If not, your work might not be publishable, and your advisor might push back.) If so, you ...


0

Should I Cite the Book from which I read the Chapter ? Yes, doing otherwise is surely plagiarism. If Yes, Then How ?, Because the Topics would be Spread over a Range of Pages. You could open with: The following paraphrases A, B & C 1. I know about Research Papers that this will be Considered as Basic Knowledge and Would'nt be cited. The phrase Basic ...


1

In general trying to sell things to your advisor puts you on dangerous ground. For example, the way you pitched your research in the question makes it seem like there are no problems that bar publication with your approach (as pointed out in the comments, fast approximations are generally publishable if they are novel). So I can't say why your advisor is ...


1

There's a high chance resubmission will not work. That's because the review says there are two issues with the paper: The proofs are straightforward, and The proofs are not written out well, taking many more lines than necessary. #2 is a purely presentation issue. #1 can be interpreted in a few ways (see the linked question) but I would guess at the second ...


16

Your experience is normal: A second year PhD student should not keep pace with postdocs nor advisors. They should learn. It seems like you're doing that. In a meeting setting, try to understand when it is appropriate to slow the pace to improve your understanding. Don't interrupt when you can learn later; interrupt when you can't, either to learn during the ...


30

Don't worry about it. You're a second-year PhD student, so you're one of the least experienced people in the room. Everyone should find this reasonable. What matters is that you show a willingness to learn, to grow, to understand, to improve. Don't be afraid of asking questions. Don't even be afraid of asking stupid questions. Most scientists will gladly ...


1

With the growing prevalence of networking technology, collaboration is easier than it ever has been before. I would think that collaboration across two campuses of the same university would be even easier. It is very probable that funding and resources can be more easily shared and that graduate students will have even an easier time working in such ...


1

From the perspective of an academic, I expect a prof to look at the motivation of the student and their background: Why are they interested in this research? What are the tools and skills they bring to the table? If they do not understand the paper yet, that can be amended when they come to intern. After all, the academic is the world expert on the topic, ...


4

Professors are, or at least tend to be, busy people. So my primary advice is to keep it short and to the point. Tell them which year you are in, that you are looking for a research internship, add a very high level topic you are interested in (the more specialized a topic you insist on, the less likely a match can be found), and that you went through their ...


2

TL;DR. Search this forum, and beyond, for impostor syndrome: What you're experiencing is perfectly normal. At masters-level, you're just entering the amphitheatre arena. Of course everyone looks better, you haven't started yet. I see outstanding papers published round the clock, that's great! You're looking in the right places, finding the best stuff. It ...


1

I know it under the term attention check questions. There are many methods, depending on if you're doing the survey online, want to/can use visual ones etc. I think this article might give a good overview, it gives examples and critiques them https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272696317300402?casa_token=yZkLxSP9zGMAAAAA:...


0

In addition to Juod's answer, you should check your research ethics approval and see what it says. In some cases, every researcher must be individually approved by the ethics committee to handle the data. If it's not allowed under your current approval, you can probably apply and get permission for addition of the extra person.


3

Print out the paper. Sit away from your computer, phone, and other distracting elements. Close the office door, perhaps. Make annotations on the paper as you go. When finished, transfer a summary to your notebook using the annotations you made on the paper. If you don't want to mark up the paper, use index cards for your notations. Put only one thought on ...


-1

I just stumbled over this YouTube video of a TED talk. It seems highly relevant, even if your condition doesn't happen to be schizophrenia. The speaker is schizophrenic and is a high-powered researcher. Plus she is a mental-health advocate. I Am Not A Monster: Schizophrenia | Cecilia McGough | TEDxPSU Cecilia McGough puts a face to schizophrenia and helps ...


1

I presume that this questions stems from a concern about the scientific career of someone who is or may be treated for a mental illness/psychiatric disorder. In that case it really depends on: Whteher the patient ever had the legal rights over their healthcare taken away (in the UK, this is called 'sectioning under the mental health act'), and in general ...


-1

I do not have a reference, just anecdotal evidence from training and working in the field of psychiatry. There are many psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses, and other allied professionals who do perform research and have performed research over many, many years. They have made enormous contributions to the field. Even before the advent of medications and more ...


5

I'm British, and spent 12 months as a placement student at CERN from 1995 to 1996. I believe that everyone had to have a reasonable competency in either English or French. They were then taught the other. I was already very good at French, hence I was placed in the top class for French, in which we spoke almost exclusively in French, learning some quite ...


4

In the United States, mental illness is considered a disability and US labor law typically forbids discrimination based on disability status when not relevant to the job at hand. However, there are some exceptions to the rule that a researcher might encounter: People with severe mental illnesses are typically ineligible for US Government security clearances,...


-2

You would be excluded: If you have a mental illness where your research will damage or endanger you, because of the nature of your research and illness. Or if you have a mental illness where your research together with your mental illness makes you a danger for others, because of the nature of your research and illness. For example, there are plenty of ...


0

I've only been to such institutes, mainly ESRF, as a visitor, but English was the practical working language, used for a lot of conversations, and everything official (the latter in addition to French). Training was delivered in English. Almost every conversation seemed to have people of many nationalities, and took place in English. This was both for ...


4

I work in an international research institution in a German speaking country. The standard language on campus is English and all communication, meetings, events etc. are either in English or in English and German simultaneously. Private conversation usually depends on the languages shared by the people in the conversation, as pointed out by lighthouse keeper....


11

Europe is a big place, with 50 countries, 10 million km², and almost 750 million inhabitants. What applies at an international research institute in Netherlands, Belgium, or Germany will not apply to a regional institute in Russia. There is no single answer that applies to all European institutions. In much of central and western Europe, science groups are ...


8

It's not only the case that mentally ill people are not generally prohibited from doing research* (as explained very well in @jakebeal's excellent answer). To counter a separate apparent misconception in the question that has nothing to do with mental health, I think it's a bit misleading to say that anyone is "allowed" to be a researcher. What I ...


4

It depends on several factors Where you live What type of research What type and level of mental illness Anecdotal evidence A. I managed to have a good and varied career including research despite having recurrent bouts of depression from the age of fourteen. I'm retired now but it was only a few years ago that I was diagnosed as bipolar. This made ...


13

In the United States, the ADA covers anyone with “physical or mental impairments that substantially limit one or more major life activities,​ such as seeing, hearing, speaking, walking or breathing.” It is illegal to discriminate against people with these conditions in hiring if they are qualified. From the FAQ on the EEOC website about the ADA: "A ...


19

A blanket ban would almost certainly fall foul of disability protections and/or patient confidentiality requirements, and so could not legally be implemented Employers (including research institutes) are prohibited from discriminating on the basis of disability (unless it can be shown to make the person genuinely unable to perform the role in question) and, ...


18

My experience is from the 1990's at a Dutch institute, so a bit dated perhaps. There were a number of people at the instutute from non-Dutch speaking countries, from across Europe, Asia, and the US (including me). And, the Dutch generally learned a variety of languages in school (the only Dutch people I met who did not speak any English at all were the nice ...


19

I'm doing a postdoc in Europe, and my fellowship has me traveling around a lot. Also note that I do physics, not MCB, though I don't think there would be much difference. My experience is that English is the official language of science, and all seminars, journal clubs, and talks (except outreach) are in English. Socializing will depend on the group. Also ...


77

From my perspective of working in multiple European universities in different countries: In a "closed" conversation setting, it will exclusively depend on the people involved in the conversation. The prime requirement is to use a language that every participant understands and speaks. A secondary concern is to use a language that people are ...


26

I am in Norway in mathematics. I use... Norwegian with the Scandinavians and Germans/Austrians. The people from Scandinavia also do this. Finnish with the Finn(s) English with the others. The Germans/Austrians speak German with each other. I have also heard a bit of French, I think, and certainly a bit of Spanish from other foreigners. Essentially, people ...


63

Let's turn this around and ask the converse. How could you tell if a researcher has a mental illness or similar disorder? Modern understanding of mental illness has moved towards a recognition that humans have an extremely wide range of functional cognitive and behavioral patterns. This means that most mental illness exists on a spectrum, where the boundary ...


11

I have never heard of any restrictions. In fact, in many countries it may even be illegal to ask someone about mental illnesses before hiring them. (A strong "crazy" vibe in the interview process might deter potential employers, though.) Also, the very nature of science is to abstract away the humanity of the researcher as far as possible. It ...


21

The details will no doubt vary between countries, but I would be surprised if anywhere has a blanket prohibition on 'mentally ill' people 'performing research' - apart from anything else, both terms are rather loosely-defined. However, there are almost certainly a range of considerations that might affect whether people with certain conditions can easily ...


1

It's certainly possible, e.g. Einstein and Newton are speculated to have Asperger's Syndrome. The real problem is whether the researcher is able to have productive ideas in spite of the mental disorder/illness, and there are certainly some illnesses where that would not be the case.


1

But, currently, studying an MA in ESL. English as a second language? If your future plans are in this direction, it seems like doing research in the life sciences would not be relevant to your career. From your question, I assume you are open to switching into a computer or life science stream. This question of "what do you want to be when you grow up?&...


0

Thanks a lot. I have passed my Thesis as well as my masters with satisfactory Noten(Grade). Over all 2.5 Noten for my Master Degree and 2.5(average of Report and Presentation) . Once thanks a lot this wonderful community who gave me the ideas and support in my difficult time.


3

It's been many years since I've been in Academia, so I may be wide of the mark, but my interpretation of what the referee is saying – loosely speaking – is that your experimental data is "too easy" on your hypothesis. While your experiments tend to suggest the hypothesis might be true ("results tried to confirm [...] the model"), they do ...


0

Here is an example. Hypothesis: Penguins only live in Antarctica. Alternate hypothesis: Penguins only live outside Antarctica. Experiments Attempt to reject the alternate hypothesis: Look in Antarctica for penguins. Attempt to reject the hypothesis: Look outside Antarctica for penguins. To gain useful information, you need to do both types of ...


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