New answers tagged

1

A literature search might not be effective, but might work. Start by finding one or a few articles that are as relevant as you can manage. Read their introductions and check for cited articles that are more relevant, or at least equally relevant. Then check which artiles cite the article you are considering (from Semantic scholar og Google scholar, for ...


9

You're asking for the impossible. Almost every mathematician with more than a few papers has had the experience of submitting a paper or circulating it as a preprint and having some relevant work they didn't know about (and are not expected to have known about) pointed out to them. If you are asking about one or two specific narrow questions or equations/...


4

No single strategy is likely to be optimal for all (math) searches. I would start with math key words (not symbols), both on the full web and in google scholar. You will get hits to math papers and books and stack exchange postings. Those links will suggest next steps. You can also post a request for references at math.stackexchange.com if you are specific ...


3

Actually, I think you method isn't that bad in practice. I do something along the same lines. I'd just tinker a bit with your approach. For example: Narrow your area. "Computer vision" sounds quite broad, focus on something more specific ("object recognition", "object tracking"). Pay attention to the citation count of a paper ...


1

I would suggest: Using Mendeley - both their Web Importer and the software, it really helps to arrange the papers in different folders and your notes while reading them. Keep a daily research journal where you can note down keywords and even author names whose other papers might be of interest to you. This especially helps at the beginning of a PhD. If you ...


1

Here are two suggestions, but only the first relates to your question. A simple way to keep track of things is with something as simple as a word processing document, though you can also use spreadsheets or databases in the same way. Simply enter the title and author(s) of the things you read along with a bunch of keywords that are meaningful to you and will ...


-4

You are right about the scientific method. We cannot comment on the evidence you have not provided. In general, you can demonstrate that evidence is sufficient to disprove a theory with statistical tests. In physics and related fields, disproving one theory and proposing an alternative is not usually sufficient to obtain a PhD. For tabletop experiments, ...


4

I don't think that anybody can possibly provide an answer without having access to many more details. The precise field matters, how well established the prevailing theories in your field are, how the quality of your data compares to previous work, how the rigor of your arguments compares to other work, etc. Generally, making these sorts of judgements is ...


4

Yes, you can do that, but it won't mean a tremendous amount in any evaluation. But probably better to list it than not. And the section you suggest is the correct place for it. It is immaterial whether you have published there or not, assuming, only, that the journal is reputable.


-1

Write a paper detailing your failure to replicate their results. If you replicated their methodology and got a different result, then that's something noteworthy in itself. As a result, the most logical thing to do is to write a paper citing their paper, and then explaining how in your attempt at replicating their paper, you have obtained different results. ...


0

This is more a way for you to think through your dilemma than an actual answer. Only you can provide the answer. In theory, there is no reason why a single course should interfere. But in practice it depends on how much time you have and how close is the deadline. Only you can evaluate the parameters. It is good to keep flexible, and a good analysis course ...


39

I get far more emails than I can reply to, but occasionally I do reply to random emails from people I don't know concerning papers I have written. The main factors that lead to me replying are: (1) I can see that the person is genuinely interested and has tried pretty hard to understand. (2) The person has a very concrete question that I can easily write ...


4

It is the choice of the author to answer emails, or not. Presumably the contents were sufficiently clear to warrant publication, so if the authors choose not to reply there remains the indirect route of extracting details from several papers on the topic, either by the same author or by others cited in the bibliography. Note that you might have more ...


8

Ideally, all researchers respond to reasonable* requests, however, quite often they don't. Here are a few things you can do to increase your chances they even get your email (adding to Fabian Meier's answer on how to increase your chance to get a response): make sure you have the correct email address - many people change institutes and are no longer ...


23

I would consider it all right if you write one or two reminder emails, maybe after three weeks and six weeks. A lot of people just forget about emails, or put them aside, especially if they cannot answer the questions immediately. Furthermore, try to make your email as "easy" as possible, so if your email is a wall of text or more than five bullet ...


4

Yes, it is ok to write again. Say you hope she is still interested and hope you can discuss the project soon. You could even suggest one or two days that it would be convenient for you and ask for alternatives. If you have applied, say so. A week isn't a long time for academics, but it is long enough that a follow up won't be insulting. I wouldn't even ...


7

No, it is not ethical. Yes, it is common. Particularly for countries that have requirements on absolute number of papers to be published by grad students prior to graduation, this is a relatively common practice. Many journals now ask for the authors to explicitly list what was each author's contribution to the article, but of course this is also quite ...


-3

This is known as padding and is not ethical. Will you take a stand? Well, will that affect your supervisor / student relationship? Your degree completion? That is probably why this practice happens and will continue to happen. You have to decide if you will talk to your supervisor, if that fails then the department head, then the head of research or even ...


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