New answers tagged

2

Yes, in the US most students start doctoral studies immediately after a bachelors. Yes, there will be quite a lot of coursework before you get to the dissertation stage. The courses prepare you to pass the qualifying exams and assure that you have a broad grounding in the field. However, almost all US graduate students work as part of the program, usually as ...


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Edited to account for a change in the question. Yes, you have a chance to get into a good school for an MS in the US, but maybe not with a full scholarship and maybe not the top 20. You have a good chance for success if you are flexible. First, the very top (R1) schools would rather admit doctoral students for the open slots, and with a good undergrad record ...


3

US News and World Report has data from 697 ranked colleges. Of these: 544 schools (78%) reported that no graduate students were the primary instructor of any course. These include all except two "National Liberal Arts Colleges." The 10 schools with the most graduate students as primary instructor were all large public research universities. These ...


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It's more common to have a Ph.D student being involved in teaching advanced upper division courses than undergraduate courses. Teaching, say, student seminars on advanced topics like string theory is a task that a PhD student in that same topic should be able to handle without much problems. But you don't want to let a PhD student handle a first year ...


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It is pretty common at the undergrad level. A doctoral student who has been a TA for several years might be assigned an undergraduate course to teach. It is probably less common for that to be an upper division course, but it could happen if they have the requisite knowledge and some teaching skills. They may or may not (probably not) get an extra stipend ...


0

Yes, if these people can credibly speak about your research ability. Naturally, one is able to talk more credibly about another's research ability if one is also able to conduct research. This isn't dissimilar from how one is only able to comment intelligently on a piece of work is one is also in the same field. Research ability and a PhD aren't an if-and-...


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"Dear School A Professor, Thank you very much for your interest. My references told me in advance that they'd be able to finish my letters by the first week of December. Will this be enough time, or shall I ask them if they can finish sooner? Thanks, eggfry"


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The bad news is that this is very difficult, that many more people attempt such a move than succeed. And the Covid-19 has made a hash out of university budgets, making future faculty hiring more uncertain. There are two pieces of good news however: One is that, due to the pandemic, a huge amount of academic activity has moved online. For example, if you are ...


1

You can, of course, request a reference letter from anyone. However, the point of having a reference letter is to speak to your ability to succeed in a research program. Because a PhD is a marker of having succeeded in the same program they're recommending you for, it is highly recommended that you get a letter from someone with a PhD. If these researchers ...


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I'd suggest two things. First is that you don't risk not getting tenure. So, keep doing the things that your current institution values and do them well. But to move on into a more research oriented situation, you can get yourself connected to others who do serious research and work with them as a collaborator and eventually a co-author. This can build a ...


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As Jon Custer mentioned in the comments, there are no standards whatsoever, however generally speaking: "Visiting" is a short-term position (I've never seen a post-doc with this title), probably even shorter than a usual postdoc, probably 9 or 12 months. A "fellow" is usually a prestigious assignment, it may be a university, college, ...


1

Other courses besides those indicated in earlier answers could be: Numerical Analysis, Complex Variables, Mathematical Statistics, and Theory of Functions.


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You can get an idea of what constitutes "Calculus" by looking at the Calculus AP test. You can get an idea of "pre-calculus" with the UC admission requirements: Three years of college-preparatory mathematics that include the topics covered in elementary and advanced algebra and two- and three-dimensional geometry. A geometry course or an ...


2

I might call the class you called “Calculus” instead “Calculus on Manifolds,” which is the name of a famous text by Spivak covering that material. Even though it has “calculus” in the title everyone would consider it “more advanced than calculus.”


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This probably means anything beyond the semi-standarized three introductory Calculus courses. Examples include: Differential Equations Linear Algebra Discrete Mathematics Probability Statistics Ring Theory Or basically topics that might consider Calculus as a prerequisite to performing well in the class. Classes that build a mathematical foundation to take ...


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As far as the US is concerned, "Calculus" is the first introduction to the material. It typically is light on proofs and often geared to the Engineering Curriculum. In Germany (where I grew up) this material was partially high school, partially (in College) classes called ``Higher Mathematics for Engineers''. To get a more detailed idea, http://www....


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In light of various clarifications, here's the bottom line for your current situation: You should definitely include this course on a list of courses you have taken "more advanced than calculus" for the purposes of US universities. And you should call it "Analysis" (or maybe "Real Analysis"), not "Calculus". More ...


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I think your question is: What does calculus mean? Calculus would usually include learning to compute derivatives and integrals. If you are learning to prove the theorems used to compute derivatives and integrals, that would be more advanced than calculus. linear algebra analysis 1, multivariable analysis, topology, group theory All of those would usually ...


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The other answers are largely correct. For those with higher-academia goals, community colleges provide Associates Degrees, and opportunities to apply those credits directly to a later 4-year degree. The primary reasons students attend these institutions are (a) lower annual cost than 4-year schools, and/or (b) students who cannot satisfy 4-year college ...


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A community college or junior college in the US offers a program that is roughly equivalent to the first two year of a bachelor's program. The degree awarded on successful completion is normally called an Associates Degree. In most cases it omits the more specialized "upper division" courses that bachelor's degree students take in the last two ...


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Two-year degrees in the US often award either an "associates degree" or some technical certification/profession-specific degree. These degrees are not typically part of the "bachelors -> masters -> PhD" pipeline or more generic "bachelors -> professional degree". Some students may start taking courses at a 2-year school ...


2

I am not a copyright lawyer and I give no representations or warranty as to the accuracy of this legal opinion. If you choose to rely on this legal opinion, you do so entirely at your own risk. Please consult a copyright lawyer in the event that you need proper legal advice on this matter. So far as I can see, the legal questions here come down to whether ...


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Oh hey a copyright hypo in real life :) There are a couple questions that this question turns on. Is the lecture a derivative work of the textbook? Generally, the holder of a copyright also has rights to derivative works. Derivative works are works which are derived from another work. For example, if I sell a t-shirt with a drawing of Mickey Mouse on it, ...


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The things hindering you would be both your level of preparation in required subjects and the level of competition in any place that you apply to. If you are missing certain courses then you can probably use non-degree status to make up and get a formal transcript. For repeating courses you have, it might work out as well, provided that you do much better. ...


0

I am not totally familiar with how social science graduate programs work. But, in general, in order to have success with grad school applications after your undergraduate: (1) you should show you have the theoretical knowledge needed to succeed in your research and graduate studies (2) AND you should show some hands-on experience, at least tangentially, ...


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I can't imagine an existing legal regime in which teaching from a textbook and "publishing" the lectures would be considered wrong unless the instructor explicitly made images or snippets copied from the book open to view. Likewise reading from the text verbatim would possibly be wrong depending on how much was read (fair use principles are ...


0

Yes, it is appropriate in the U.S. to buy and attach a gift to a hand-written note thanking the student. I am aware of this happening in the United States, and it was much appreciated by the student. In fact, the gift was a University hoodie and some University-branded coffee mugs, and although the student has long since left the United States, they still ...


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tl;dr: Back pay for overtime work. My student just graduated, and he really is an exquisite person, he worked more than he probably should have (extra hours, weekends) without me asking What you're describing is the common situation in US academia where Ph.D. candidates - junior researchers - work more than a full-time position without any overtime pay. In ...


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Another thing to consider is that those law schools would need to get the contracts from somewhere. Where? Unlike many, if not most answerers here, IANAL, but I have just taken on several new mortgages in buying a house and, so, signed several new contracts, which were mostly boilerplate with blanks to narrow them to us (name, new address, SSN, etc.). With ...


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I'm neither a lawyer nor a law student (which, judging by the score of answers written by people of similar credentials, doesn't bode well), but I'll try to extrapolate from my experience studying engineering because similar questions get asked in that field. From what I've heard, law school curriculums contain a lot of material and the programs are very ...


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It all comes down to the basic fact that university is not a trade school, regardless of the area of study. The distinction between Computer Science and Software Engineering that others mentioned is but another example. If law school were meant to be a trade school then a graduate should be ready to tackle the bar exam but that is far from the case, even for ...


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Writing or interpreting a contract is an applied skill. It doesn't make sense to approach it in the abstract. When you draft a contract, you're protecting a real client's actual interests. Not coincidentally, you're also bound by professional ethics not to share those interests with anyone outside your law firm — including students of the legal profession. ...


4

One of the problems with gifts is that one does not want have liability of insinuation. Giving my Japanese students a gift, which has a cultural weight of something in return, is very different from giving one to an American student. There is not a clear answer to this question. Having said that, I've settled on giving my students the books that they used ...


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I'm going to write a second answer here, just to rebut a claim made in the other answers, which is the view that writing a commercial contract is just a trivial or routine matter once you know the underlying rules of contract law. That claim is totally false, and I do not think anyone with actual legal training/experience would believe it. There is a great ...


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Their law firms must have templates or boilerplates As a matter of law, written contracts do not need to follow any templates or boilerplates. In fact, most contracts do not need to be in writing in the first place. Where there is a written form, that is only evidence of the contract, not the contract itself. Not only most existing contract templates/...


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I went to law school in Australia, not the US, but I also had this experience --- that courses on contract law never involved reading any actual legal contracts, and that this latter exercise was almost completely absent from the whole program. Across my LLB and LLM, the only time we ever did anything like this was in a legal skills workshop in LLM (...


1

Yes, a gift should be ok and I think that the gift should be tailor made for the recipient. I think it would be hard for any of us to say what kind of gift to get your student. That being said, does your student like wine? Do they prefer a specific brand, vintage, or type (e.g., Cab, Merlot, Pinot, etc.)? Are they open to trying a wine from your country? ...


0

There can be confusion over academic standards between the US and Europe. If this is the case, you can send to your prospective advisor, samples of the exam papers you have taken. It is not possible to say whether this might have any effect, but think about it. I am quoting advice given to my son by his British advisor before applying, successfully, to MIT.


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A bottle of wine is an excellent gift. You can pick up a decent wine for 30 dollars and attach a nice hand written note to it. Of course you also tell a short story about the wine when making the gift, I myself e.g. picked up a box of very expensive wine in Italy once. I gifted a bottle on two very special occasions. Regardless of what the more nerdy SE ...


1

As others have also pointed out, I don't see a problem with it unless there is a policy at your university, however, many ideas are very subjective, as for example if he doesn't use pens that much, he might not use this one at all, and actually make him feel guilty, or, if he doesn't like physical books, etc...


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Honestly I don't have any valid reason, I did not pay attention earlier to my academic studies. But I think I can't mention that. What can be some possible reasons that I can tell him? On the contrary, if you think that was the cause, then that's exactly what you should say. Prospective supervisors are interested in a lot of aspects of candidates, and ...


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That part of the interview is not a test. You simply ask the questions that you want to know the answers to, not that somebody on this site told you to ask.


30

Many U.S. schools (especially state ones) actually have written policies on gifts. Look for it on your school's intranet, or ask HR if you can't find it. They vary: I know at least one state school where any gifts, even a cup of coffee from a professor to a former student, are forbidden. Some schools have a cap on monetary value, like $100. You're unlikely ...


55

I don't see any problem with this. Something from your own country would be appropriate, as would a book that is important in your field. Even a tourist souvenir from your country as something to remember you. But not too expensive or elaborate.


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Providing that you have done better recently, then the reasons you give here are fine. "I didn't pay attention early in my studies." People look for growth, not just excellence overall. In fact, that growth can be a strength. Just be honest, both about the past and more recent things. And focus on the ways you are prepared to move forward. Honesty ...


2

As @Buffy comments, the other answers do not seem so accurate about R1 and R2 grad math departments in the U.S. That is, funding is mostly as Teaching Assistants, administered through the department, not by individuals, and funding-and-admission decisions are also made at a department level, by a committee. Yes, having a faculty person ardently promoting ...


0

Yes, as @Chris has described, this can be a good tactic -- but only if done properly. That answer describes some examples of proper form. However, please don't just blindly send email to every professor you can find. You need to show that your interests have applicability to the professor, to show you've "done your homework" and chosen your ...


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In the US disciplinary records are protected by FERPA, so one school can't check another's records without written permission from the applicant. Others here that say that the school you are applying to is free to ask you about why your transcript looks the way it does, are right. If you got kicked out of a school or failed a class for cheating, expect your ...


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In my experience some schools take a very hard line on academic dishonesty and expel students for cheating on exams. This would probably show up on your record. Other schools give students a few strikes by having an internal list of disciplinary action, so that a repeat offender can be identified for expulsion. Otherwise the list stays private and probably ...


1

Generally speaking, in the US, you can depend to some extent on a "right to privacy" that would make such an inquiry improper and replying to it also improper. But it isn't necessarily assured. The US Constitution is silent on a right to privacy, but many Supreme Court decisions have expanded that right, though not to the extent of the EU's Right ...


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