New answers tagged

1

I wouldn't say easier, but definitely different. There are a lot of tradeoffs. With only a bachelors, the path is quite long and starts, most places/fields, with advanced coursework. This is due to the fact that the US bachelors is a general degree, not especially specialized as it is in some other places, say Europe. One normally (most places/fields) has to ...


1

The Masters degree is likely to help you in several respects: (1) through the experience you have gained from the research component; (2) through the coursework done in the program; and (3) through the extra year or two of general experience in your field. Any previous experience, coursework, or research work, is going to be relevant in assessing your ...


1

Yes, you can, and probably should mention at least the research area of the professor and name them if you like. For US admissions, they may not write back since the admissions process is probably committee controlled and they have no part it it. If you get any response it is most likely to be just encouragement to apply. But you won't get accepted as their ...


1

First, the SoP is not the place to explain the past, especially problems in the past. The SoP should be entirely focused on future plans, both for study and thereafter. It isn't normally a document of unlimited length, so use the available space there to show what you intend to do in doctoral study as well as future career direction. However, a short phrase ...


2

Perhaps this isn't the best PI for you as they are likely very busy - perhaps too busy. But, in most fields in the US it isn't necessary to contact a professor before you apply for admission. And in most fields the professor you contact is not going to be able to have any influence over your admission as it is handled by a committee. There are a few ...


-2

If you need to know and they have a phone number, I recommend calling people. Email overwhelms most professors inboxes, but these days many people never think to give someone a call. I have had much better luck with getting what I need sorted out on the phone. Skype or google phone credit is a cheap enough way to manage this internationally.


1

They might have been busy. These days more than research they are busy with administrative works — which are unavailable. So ideally you could follow up after two or three weeks from first email. With my experience I would suggest contact them as you contact other professionals and follow up to have an update. You have to wait until they reply. Meantime if ...


1

You should choose the strongest letters of recommendation possible. Everything else is secondary. Strongest means commenting very positively on your aptitude for research as compared to your peers. Usually, the letter from your research advisor(s) are your strongest letters; letters that say only "Aymous did well in my class" are much, much weaker. ...


5

Not really, no. You are asking people (with very short notice even) to write a LoR for you, which in itself is already not ideal. Then you'll just throw out that work. Ask yourself if you'd want to spend a few hours, either taking up your free time or deprioritizing some other task, to write a letter which is not going to be used. I think you know the answer....


3

I’m a current faculty member and former department chair at a UC campus, and somewhat familiar with these policies. Here’s my “insider’s” take: it is not in the University of California’s interest, nor in the interest of other job candidates, nor even in your own interest (although you might disagree about that), for the answer to your questions to be ...


1

IANAL but I assume that the text is in accordance with a FOIA style law. If so, then anyone can FOIA the external letters of reference in support of your application. The university has identified the parts of the letter which it will provide and which it will not provide in response to FOIA queries. FOIA requests are themselves government records and can ...


6

You already mention most of your papers in your SOP. I assume this one is the least important, otherwise you would have left out another article. This should be fine, it is mentioned in your CV so if they want they can be aware of the paper. They will probably not notice, or when they notice not deem the paper relevant enough to be included in your SOP. ...


8

No. Universities in countries where this is required by law strive to provide a level playing field, not to introduce "reverse discrimination". In other words, disabilities of all kinds are considered as mitigating factors when considering how that disability would have affected the objective criteria that would otherwise be used to evaluate ...


0

If these are your own papers, they belong in your list of publications in your CV. If they're not your papers, there's probably not a lot of point in citing them. I think it's enough to focus your SOP and personal statement on answering the questions, "Why are you applying? What will you do if they admit you? What are your goals and how does this fit ...


1

I can't guarantee this, but expect that most places will start each cycle with a "clean slate", ignoring information that came in from previous application cycles. If that is the case you need a complete application for this cycle. But this might not be the case everywhere, so you should ask the individual department this question: Are old ...


1

Under very narrow circumstances, yes, F-1 students can work outside the university during their studies. CPT and OPT are the relevant programs. However, I have never heard of someone establishing their own company under these programs. I suppose it's possible, but you will need to talk to a lawyer about this.


1

Not really, and not at all during the first year. There are heavy restrictions for subsequent years. You can self fund if you are wealthy enough, though. See: https://www.uscis.gov/working-in-the-united-states/students-and-exchange-visitors/students-and-employment The question of business ownership is more complex and probably needs US legal advice. Owners ...


0

It doesn't matter since there is nothing you can do about it now. I personally believe in 'playing safe' especially when I'll have to pass through the hands of others. You see, you're not there so what you put on paper should be advised. Just be careful next time because people formulate different opinions based on what they see. All the same, to answer your ...


6

In a way, it doesn't matter at this point and so you shouldn't worry about it. Save your energy for things you can control. But I think you really shouldn't worry about it, because this is almost certainly not a big deal. I've submitted a lot of resumes for academic jobs (and even got offered some of them) and never once thought to look up rules around ...


2

Obviously, it's not possible to answer definitively whether not answering such questions will negatively impact your application in this particular instance. However, it seems unlikely that it would positively impact your application. For instance, if the admissions committee uses that field for review, having to go dig through you SoP for the answer would ...


3

Actually, don't assume that this question isn't about research and academics. In fact, it sounds like an invitation to provide a "personal statement" beyond the CV and SoP. What is it that motivates you? What have mentors taught you that you want to emulate? What projects and courses have been important in setting your direction? On and on. Lots of ...


2

It seems both immoral and illegal to me...It just feels they are stealing the grant money from me It is understandable that you are very upset at having been arbitrarily assigned additional work for no additional benefit. However, "immoral and illegal" is likely too far. It is highly unlikely that you were personally named in your advisor's grant. ...


0

This happened to me once. To make it worse, I was told I must teach the semester I did not want to, and I could not teach the semester I did want to. You probably should not fight it. You do not have any leverage. Really the only action you can take is to complete your PhD a semester earlier than planned. It's probably not illegal. It probably is ...


5

You could always emulate the style of Richard Duffin when he wrote a recommendation letter for John Nash.


8

Quantify their rank I'm in a hard science field, so the answer may be less relevant to humanities letters. I have found that the strongest letters highlight specific interactions and anecdotes about positive qualities, but most importantly rank the student relative to a distribution. For example I have been teaching Physics 101 and Engineering 305 for the ...


12

I'm not a lawyer, but suggest the following is accurate. I don't think you have anything to worry about as long as you have a contract, signed and in hand. Tenured and tenure track faculty in US are paid an annual salary, not by the week or month. The SSN is a government requirement that assure your taxes are properly paid and accounted for. Salaries are ...


4

I think it's important to show and not tell. While most people simply use adjectives to describe, it would be great if you can show concrete examples, past interactions etc that you had with him/her, which can drive your point across better. Do also say, what difference did he/she make. What could not have been done without their attributes ?


19

Think about how you know the student is excellent -- what sets them apart. In particular, if this is the first recommendation you've written, that suggests you may have a limited basis of comparison (to other students you've worked with). The difficulty you have in conveying your opinion may be related to an underlying difficulty in justifying your opinion. ...


7

The main thing to remember is to explain the basis for your evaluation and give a sensible comparison of the student relative to the cohort. It is not necessary to give detailed information on grades (since that will be given separately), but you should give some underlying objective information that explains your assessment that the student is excellent. ...


48

Since you've never seen such letters, you don't know what they usually contain. Ask one of your senior colleagues for examples of letters, imitate them, and then ask that senior colleague to give you feedback. Mentoring is one of the jobs of senior faculty.


31

If you can write about what the student has done, rather than just the grades in courses, it is a plus. Any special projects? Any leadership actions? Are they self directed? Do they have insight? Are they helpful to others? Have they done independent study, alone or in small groups? Would you take them on for a research project without qualification? Can you ...


1

My suggestion is that if the university awards two separate degrees (something like two diplomas), then list them separately. Otherwise just say you have a double major. But make sure you are correct in your interpretation. If your university gives you a separate GPA for each degree, then you can list them as stated on transcripts, but otherwise, avoid ...


1

An alternative: Do not bother writing your GPA on a resume at all, or report just a major GPA for the subject of the graduate courses to which you're applying (e.g. report a math GPA if you're applying for math grad school). Nobody will find this unusual, as your applications will include a transcript. Perhaps some search committee members will inspect a few ...


1

I think you are overthinking this. There is no one 'professional' style that is the right way. The way you suggest it seems fine, but you can take a look at other resumes as well, a lot of researchers have them on their personal web page. I'd suggest something like this: Bachelor of Physics - University of SomewhereLandCity - 1/1/2021 GPA: X.Y Bachelor of ...


2

This answer is really about some (and not all) top programs in mathematics, but perhaps it applies more widely. A number of top PhD programs see their main mission as training future top mathematicians, maybe not just Fields Medalists, but folks at the level of invited speakers at American Mathematical Society meetings (of which there are around 40 a year). ...


2

Given that the design of US doctoral programs is to enable those with a bachelors to succeed, the answer would be, structurally, yes. But for the admission process itself, the effect, while variable, I expect to be weak - with caveats. There is, in the US, normally some sort of qualifying process before one formally begins dissertation research. Some places ...


3

Pick the people who know you and your work best and can give the most detailed reports of their observations. Unless your reference is a famous individual, it's less important who writes your LOR than what they say about why they recommend you.


0

I expect that your "slight feeling" comes not so much from the university itself as from its recruiters. If the university is trying to attract students, it will naturally prefer to have them for a longer program as well. American students frequently earn multiple degrees. It is not uncommon to have master's degrees in addition to doctoral ...


1

Have a look at how can you enroll in german universities, or scandinavian universities. Some of them offer (relatively speaking) not so expensive bachelor and master courses. If you are looking into US universities, we are talking about tuition fees being 10/20 times lower, with similar or cheaper costs of life (ok, this is a gross assumption, Stockholm , ...


5

It's part of a faculty job to handle letters of recommendation. Do not worry about being a bother -- they are used to handling these requests. If this person has previously told you to contact their secretary, then contact the secretary. If not, then send your request to him, and let him decide how to handle it. He may decide the way to handle it is to ask ...


2

I agree with other commentators that you should take whatever action is reasonable to find a new place for the student, but their acceptance depends on the decisions of others. Your obligation is to make reasonable efforts to assist the student to find a new place, but you can only do what you can do --- you are not obliged to guarantee successful placement ...


10

can I count on this oral offer? No. This is not an official offer from a graduate program and you should not count on anything that isn’t an official offer. It’s certainly nice and somewhat reassuring to have an informal promise of this type, but that’s all it is. Individual people are occasionally careless with their words and are known to break promises ...


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