New answers tagged

0

Yes, it is ok to ask and to say that you really need to know how you are doing. But, I'll guess that you won't get a specific answer, or, at least, not as specific as you like. It may be that the "scale" is really just "preponderance of evidence" for the various grades. After all, the grading system in the US is fairly crude with only ...


3

In addition to the good answers already given, it's worth noting that a typical professor's work is actually a combination of 3 different streams, each with its own rhythm regarding holidays. (I'm assuming 12 month not 9 month appointments here.) a) Teaching. During academic term, professors need to fulfil their explicit teaching responsibilities, plus ought ...


6

I can't really make much sense of the question, but I can explain how time off usually works in the US, though of course there are variations. Professors aren't really typical employees. They likely technically have a set number of days they can take off and need to register them in some HR system, but usually no one is watching closely to make sure they are ...


3

No, that isn't a real concept in the US, with a few exceptions. Most federal holidays have been moved to Monday for purposes of "celebration" (i.e. a day off resulting in a 3-day weekend). If Christmas falls on a Thursday, however, some places will also make Friday a non-work day. A few states have one or two other "holidays", normally ...


0

The definition isn't general and would be specific to an individual university. It might differ from one place to another and wouldn't even exist at many universities. For a complete definition you need to ask that university. But, at an R1 university in the US it is unlikely to be a faculty position and almost certainly isn't on the normal tenure track, ...


1

An additional perspective (from a European university, if that matters), adding to already good answers. Mostly in case that someone with a concrete issue finds this question later. I would most likely advise our grad student to wait retaining a lawyer until absolutely necessary. Apart from the non-negligible monetary cost of doing so, bringing your lawyer ...


1

All that stuff would still generally be best done by a lawyer. Aside from being knowledgable in actual law (or at least able to look it up properly), lawyers are well-versed in finding and analysing rules/policies/procedures, and marshalling evidence and argument to achieve a desired outcome within a set of rules. The skills that lawyers use would transfer ...


2

The content doesn't differ between advanced high school courses and college courses, but the pedagogy and evaluation techniques do. For example, when I took AP biology and calculus in high school, they were taught over the course of 2 or 3 semesters, and the grades were based roughly 80% on attendance, homework, and regular quizzes, and 20% on mid-term and ...


11

You already have very detailed answers on the U.S. system. Let me talk a little bit about how a French perspective creates distorted expectations. In the French system, the curriculum is (essentially) set at the highest level by the Ministry of Education. Much of the nonsense passed as education in some countries (sometimes with sectarian affiliations) is ...


2

There are several differences between the two systems. It might be helpful to think of the first year of American colleges as weakly like the college preparatory courses in France. I say that because there is some attempt to even out the pretty substantial disparities among state educational systems. College in the US is one year longer than college in ...


3

It's going to depend on which math and physics books you're looking at. There are typically several levels of 1st year college courses. First year calculus, physics, &c for liberal arts or business students are not the same courses as those intended for STEM majors. If you're looking at texts intended for the former, they probably do cover basically ...


18

The other answers here are correct. Colleges and high schools across the US are so different (in my opinion the single biggest problem with US education) that it's almost meaningless to speak of how the average high school education compares to the average college education. However, there is one difference between high school and college in the US that is ...


2

Yes, they might be a benefit, but, since they aren't refereed, it might be limited unless it they are remarkable in some way. If they are also submitted to a journal as well, then it would be worth more. It would, however, require people examining your application to take a look at the papers and make some judgement. They might be willing to do this, or not. ...


12

In my experience as an American student, the overlap depends heavily on 1. how good your high school is and 2. how good the college is. There is a huge range in the academic rigor of high schools and colleges. Public schools depending on region vary widely in how many advanced courses such as AP courses they offer, some only one or two, others 10+. Top level ...


7

American "college" student here (I know that word has a different meaning in French). In my narrow experience, American college courses and books do indeed differ from high school courses and books, but there is a significant degree of overlap. For example, chapters 1-11 of Calculus: Early Transcendentals by James Stewart cover single-variable ...


7

They may use the same books, but college is about twice as fast as high-school. A year-long high school "AP computer science A" course tests out as a semester-long college computer programming-I. In practice, it's a little less (the high school version covers as many topics, but they write fewer program so are a bit weaker overall). I think high ...


64

First of all, the US has no university system. It has somewhere around 1500 community colleges offering 2 year degrees and 3500 colleges and universities offering 4-year degrees, all of which run with more independence than an ordinary French university. (Keep in mind the federal government has established only a tiny handful of universities; public ...


21

This is a US centric answer. Over the past 50 years there has been a vast change in what happens in HS. For example, when I was in school it was extremely uncommon for a HS student to take beginning Calculus. Now the better students do that pretty regularly through the Advanced Placement program which is an attempt to teach college courses in HS. So, the ...


1

It's possible that a Research Assistant Professor position remains only a Research Professorship, meaning that it's not TT and you have to self-fund with grants. However, I would think that a Research Assistant Professor who is publishing and obtaining grants as PI could be more competitive for TT positions in general (at other schools) than a postdoc who is ...


3

I don't think there can be a general answer about future outcomes for a position like this. It seems like a bigger investment for the department than a typical post doc spot, though, which may be a positive. I would look at the history of the position in the relevant department. Are there tenure-track faculty there that came from this path? I'd also ask ...


0

It's easier to be hired already as a professor than as a post-doc in most fields. I believe you can find data about this, plus your time as a professor will give you practice on all of the things that professors need to be good at, whereas a post-doc may not. Also, as a professor you are better situated for networking. You are in computer science, so I don't ...


2

The expected behavior here is that you talk to faculty after you’ve been accepted to the program, not before. That way you have more information to make your decision about where to go, but faculty aren’t spending a lot of time with students who aren’t going to be accepted. Contacting a faculty member is unlikely to give you an advantage in admissions if ...


1

If you are applying for a Ph.D. (or an academic job), a strong recommendation letter from someone who is known well by the person making the admission or hiring decision is almost always a very big advantage. It will ensure that your application gets serious consideration, and will give you the edge against similarly-qualified candidates. That said, for M....


2

In my view (and I was MSc admissions officer at some point) recommendation letters at MSc level are largely a tick box exercise. I have admitted more than hundred MSc students and a recommendation letter hasn't made a difference even once. It is fine from my point of view that the student shows they can find somebody professional to recommend them, but as ...


2

A point I don't think has been made yet - value, perceived or otherwise, is not always allowed to be considered when hiring, depending on where you wish to use that PhD qualification. I can give a UK academic hiring perspective. As part of equality, diversity and inclusion measures hirers are required not to subjectively judge the value of a qualification, ...


3

To answer your question - industries where there are many resources from India are better going to appreciate your Indian education. Otherwise - it's more important that you're able to demonstrate that you're really strong in the skillset you already have. If you know that you are interested in nuclear physics or particle physics there might be unforeseen ...


2

I'm sure a famous university offers more opportunities during your PhD, a better-valued degree and maybe a better network. But if you consider a career in the academic field, you may consider publications first (sorry if you already did or if it's too obvious for you). If you get in a lab or team that used to publish a lot, have the students participate in ...


6

Like the others, I have an Indian background and hope my answer doesn't come across as being racist towards people with my own ethnicity. In my area of research (quantum chemistry) there is one professor working in India who is a member of the most prestigious academy in our field and that is Debashis Mukherjee. There's over over 300 people that have been ...


3

A good rule of thumb is for you to: Find people who are where you would want to be in X years. See what they did to get there (which includes where they got their Ph.D.). When I decided that I want a career in academic research, I saw that nearly every prominent academic researcher in my country either got their Ph.D. in the U.S., or did a post-doc or ...


16

About me: I'm a member of the hiring public. I've worked 35 years in a multination company with a significant presence in India, and a heavy dependence on technology. What is Value? If "value" is measured in terms of what doors it opens, then you may open more doors worldwide with a US degree, provided it is from a more recognized university. ...


2

No, you don't need to report it, and in the US it won't be reported either due to privacy laws. The school handled it and it is done. Move on. I worry about the professor, actually. If you cited the original it isn't plagiarism in fact. But if you quote it (rather than paraphrasing)with citation then it should be clearly "quoted" using some sort of ...


9

I have an engineering degree from one of the top 20 colleges in India and my observation has been that my Professors were usually those who got Phd from IITs (most elite colleges in India). So when you say "more academic value", it depends on what you mean exactly. If it is teaching job, then what matters is also which college in India grants you ...


35

You are missing an important angle. Where do you want to go after your PhD? In German there is the word "Stallgeruch" which roughly translates to "the smell of the own stable". Don't underestimate this. If you decide that you want to have a job or academic future at place X, doing your PhD at or near X provides you with a network near X (...


9

I'm going to preface this answer by noting that I am of Indian heritage myself, before the accusations of racism start. Yes, a PhD from an American university is much more valuable. Even putting aside the issue of university rankings, the fact is that the United States is the world's only superpower and has been largely responsible for most of the world's ...


61

While I was an Indian undergrad in mathematics, I was told similar things by my friends who were doing, or planning to do, their graduation at universities abroad. Specifically, they told me that: The top universities abroad are better than the top universities in India for graduate education. Even if I were to be admitted to a good university abroad whose ...


1

Oh, it doesn't really matter. If it is course-based CS master, not researched-based CS master, then a recommendation letter only takes a very very small portion of it, so whether it is from a math professor or a CS professor doesn't differ too much. GPA is the most important. One of my friends who worked in the admission process before told me that the first ...


0

I speak, with trepidation, because of my former membership in three IRBs. I became a member in two cases because I got in trouble myself. When I was a member I pressed for scrupulous adherence to the law and institutional policy. IRB members and staff are frequently fuzzy on both. As a member I needed to have a copy of the law, the regulations, and ...


3

Switching labs at PhD level should be quite the exception and it should only happen if nothing else works. It definitely should not be a planned move. You'll upset your old supervisor and the new one will be wary of you. If you stay at the same institution, chances are nobody will want to touch you if you do such a switch. Better to right away come clean to ...


5

The reason it is difficult to answer this is that it can depend to a large extent on personalities. A "new" advisor might not want to take you on thinking about their relationship with the "old" advisor. The "old" advisor might feel insulted and cause problems for you. You might, after a year, have responsibilities to the ...


1

It really depends on exactly what you are doing: "surveys" and "psychological experiments" are not the same. The regulations providing for IRBs in the United States are governed by the Common Rule, a policy of the Department of Health and Human Services. The first paragraph: §46.101 To what does this policy apply? (a) Except as detailed ...


9

I'll address the academic, rather than legal aspects of the question. All legitimate scientific journals require ethics review for published human subjects research. Any human subjects research which is has not passed ethics review must not be published. In my opinion, any such research is not part of main-stream science. So the answer is no. It is ...


4

Those vacation days have a monetary value. It never makes sense to work through them. If you have X days of labor to get to a good ending point with your work, then labor for those X days and then take a paid vacation, and terminate employment at the end of the vacation. Alternatively, if you will be compensated for the days without "taking them"...


2

This is most likely a budgeting issue. Unused vacation is something HR doesn't like, because it means they must accrue liabilities. Employees are for this reason expected to and usually reminded to consume vacation before employment ends. But now it's too late, so there's no point to argue.They can either pay you out or you take your vacation, of course ...


15

The advisor is asking you to officially take the days off before the contract finishes, but to work during these days, so you get the work done and he/she does not have to pay these days off, as per the policy of your institution is "to pay departing postdocs for un-used vacation days". So yes, he is asking you to do something unethical. With him/...


3

Not fraud, simply a request he or she knows you’re adult enough to accept or decline. I’ve had colleagues who’d looked forward to vacation time in order to dig in and wrap up a project. I’ve had those times too.


11

Your advisor's request is definitely unethical. Don't do it. There can be no benefit to your relationship because he has already burned the metaphorical bridges.


39

You've earned the days as paid vacation, you don't have to work during them. The money it costs to pay you for those days is part of your compensation for the work you've already done and the stretches of time that you came to work instead of taking the day off. If you do decide to take the time to work on finishing up some papers, that could be good for ...


5

Generally speaking, no, a degree requires more than just a certain number of credits. There are usually specific requirements for certain courses, and more requirements for credits and courses within a "major". A minimum GPA is a requirement and there may be a separate GPA-in-major requirement. But, you may have actually accumulated all of the ...


1

This is unlikely to be a formal term anywhere, but a person who does what professors normally do (research, teaching, ...) but without a formal position/job/salary, might well describe themself as a pseudo professor. Without a formal relationship to a university, they are probably less bound by university regulations, except, perhaps in treatment of students,...


1

If such practice was common, I don't know that it is common, but I would say that it is not rare for any kind of academic promotion in the US. What should the letter contains, The student gets to decide. It should comment on your teaching. When was the optimal time to ask for it (e.g., as soon as the collaboration terminates, as close to the submission ...


Top 50 recent answers are included