New answers tagged

1

In the US this probably matters less than you think, though I don't know your field. In most cases, however, a research advisor isn't chosen at the time of acceptance, but later, maybe a lot later. First, you need to pass qualifying exams and before that, take whatever courses are necessary to enable it. If you are already prepared for those exams, then it ...


3

Sounds like you're in a course which is grading on a curve. The idea here is that everyone's score is going to fit a Bell curve with a predetermined mean. This means there won't be any "Christmas-comes-early" results where everyone scores A's, but also no "what-the-hell-everyone-is-failing" panic attacks either. Grade inflation is unlikely in a class that's ...


0

So if the marking scheme and the assignment instructions required sources, even simple mundane ones, then you should have included them. This is usually an exercise to get people into the practice of using and recording correctly the sources used. The "grading against peers" is how your submission "stacked up" or compared to the other submissions. The ...


1

We cannot update submitted applications with new SOP or CV or other information. Unfortunately, this means that you will not be able to update your application due to the regulations of admission. Thus, overthinking it will not help but to make you uncomfortable. Regarding to your situation, there are two possible scenarios I can think of: The ...


0

I'll assume this is for a permanent, not a temporary or part time position. Unfortunately, there is no general advice that would be applicable everywhere. The US doesn't have a national system for such things, nor even one that applies to any single State. You may have a lot of flexibility or very little. But if the offer lays out a lot of things then you ...


1

I would say, from what I understand, the answer depends on who is doing the valuation. I have seen people claiming certain school/countries has a bias towards phds from the US. I have also heard that it was better to do your PhD in US if you want to stay in US afterwards and it was better to do your PhD in Europe if you want to stay in Europe. It is hard for ...


1

There is a power dynamic in the application process that any applicant needs to be conscious of. There are only a small number of positions for a large number of applicants, which grows to be a very large number at elite institutions. In other words, there is a significant power imbalance to the detriment of the applicant. The consequence of this is that ...


3

One simple answer is no, the two aren't equally valued, because the two are also not even regarded as equal. As a trite example, consider that many European countries (especially the German-influenced ones) are very picky about which letters you can put before or after your name. I have a dual-degree, so I am "allowed" to use Dr. as a legal part of my name ...


3

If both of your institutions participate in the Council of Graduate Schools, there's something called the April 15 resolution (cgsnet.org/april-15-resolution) where you don't have to accept an offer until April 15. That way you don't have to feel pressured to accept an offer until you've gotten them. It's still early enough where schools are deciding offers.


1

You can ask, but the most likely answer is that no information can be given. Decisions may not be finalized until near the deadline. There may be regulations that prohibit giving out information to individuals prior to agreed-on dates. Mentioning the other problem does you no good and might possibly do harm. The admissions committee isn't going to disrupt ...


2

In the US this would certainly be unusual and at many universities, impossible. Admission to doctoral programs is done by a committee and there are cost implications for admitting a student. Space is needed, if nothing else. An individual professor, most places, has little control over that. You can ask, of course, and there is no issue with exploring ...


2

It seems as if you have done all you could. If they won't accept supplementary material, then they won't. I'm not sure about the comment on not reading letters, though. It seems like it would be a flaw in the system as long as the letters are in (readable) English. If you get past initial screening you can raise such thing in interviews or in future ...


3

The general answer isn't really a number. I expect that in most cases a teaching load is similar to that of a regular faculty member, though that isn't necessarily the case. The semester, trimester, quarter system defines how many regular terms there are per year, with trimester and quarter often being synonymous. It is the number of terms that most ...


3

Wear whatever makes you feel comfortable within reason. Mathematicians will be judging you based on what you say and how you think, not what you wear. And if a future advisor for whatever strange reason judges you poorly based on what you like to wear, you probably don't want them as an advisor. Remember, you've been accepted. You are now trying to find an ...


0

Business casual. If you assume 20 students, you'll have 1 that wears a suit (or even just a tie) and look oddly out of place. Probably 5 that wear jeans. And look fine, but maybe a little undergrad-y. The rest in business casual. Given the economics, probably not even that fancy of a business casual. My rec (for a man, don't know women's attire): ...


0

I wore khaki's, dress shirt, tie, and sport coat when I was in your position. The professor remarked that he was impressed that I took the occasion serious enough to look sharp. However, I would agree with others here that a tie is probably not necessary. Chinos, a dress shirt and a nice blazer/sport coat looks really sharp without looking overdressed in ...


-3

I would call the university and ask if they have any particular preference. However, let’s assume that they do not, I highly suggest that you wear the type of clothing that makes you feel the most confident. Mind you, you need to balance that notion with the fact that you are going to be at a university. But the underlying idea is that if you believe that ...


13

Math professors tend to be pretty casual dressers compared to those in other disciplines. Wearing khaki pants and a collared shirt (polo or button down) would put one towards the dressier end of the spectrum at most places, and jeans and a t-shirt / hoody are usually unlikely to cause one to stand out. I think that if you were to wear a suit and tie to ...


0

First of all, it depends on the University, so the best answer is probably to ask someone there, if you are already in personal contact with any Professors or graduate students there. That being said, I would be extremely surprised if anyone expected you to wear a suit or even a tie. Many professors I visited with on my visits (Computer Science, U.S.) were ...


11

In my experience in the US, computers and their parts are considered part of overhead, as are things like desks, office chairs, etc. When you get a grant, part of it goes to "you", and part of it goes to the university as overhead - they use this to keep the lights on and for other various expenses that you don't directly see, but they also often make some ...


15

I strongly recommend that you talk to your department chair and ask for their help. The situation as I understand it is that you obtained confirmation in writing from university employees that the equipment you wanted to purchase would be covered by the grant and you would get reimbursed. Now the institution is refusing to reimburse you. This is pretty ...


20

What you need to do is work it out locally. If necessary, the grant funder may need to make a judgement. But it seems like you were trying to get around a restriction by somewhat questionable means. Not necessarily ethically dubious means, but questionable. A pedantic interpretation of the statement in the grant, and ignoring its likely intent is what got ...


1

It varies, so you need to check with the program. For example, if the grad students are unionized at that institution, the CBA might specify that the PI can't sweeten a grad student's base stipend out of a grant. There might also be distinctions between what's permissible during the academic year and what's permissible during the summer.


6

In my experience, “guaranteed funding” means that (depending on field) you will be either working for a PI who has grant money to pay you or working as a TA (with the possible exception of your first year, where their may be general department support while you find an advisor). Because graduate stipends are typically on a pay scale, working on a grant can ...


0

I doubt that it would happen. You don't say what the stipend is for. If it is an RA then you are already being paid for research help and it might actually come out of any grants. If it is a TA then you will have certain (teaching related) duties for that and the research project is probably more associated with your own degree than as an "assistant". But, ...


11

According to the yearly NIH report, in 2018, a total of 625 NIH Research Project grants (R01) were awarded, and the total cost for NIH (funding + other costs) of these grants was $347,466,328. This averages to $347,466,328/625, or about $556,000 of funding per year in one grant, or $2,780,000 in total for a 5-year grant The Specific Aims application ...


5

R01s are the main grants given by the US NIH to research labs. They typically have a single PI but can have some other co-PIs, and depending on scope are worth a few hundred thousand USD per year over five years. The "specific aims page" is a 1-page summary of the goals of the grant, kind of like an abstract. So, this tweet is connecting A) the words on 1 ...


6

Yes, your advisor behaviour is unprofessional and certainly against the ethical policies of virtually any serious publisher. I'd contact the other coauthor and write a joint email along the following lines (modify according to your knowledge of the situation): Dear X, We are disappointed by your refusal to share the final versions of the ...


0

It is unlikely there is any advantage of applying too early, because unlike undergraduate admissions, there is usually no "quotas" to be filled here. Contacting prospective supervisors early, however, is a very good idea. (1) They would give early feedback/pointers given your research statement, (2) They might give you advice if they're not themselves ...


4

Unless you are willing to make a formal complaint through the university or the journal, there is probably little you can do. But don't work with this person in the future. That should be obvious. If you are already clear of his influence and ability to sabotage you, then a formal complaint might be worth doing, but more for the benefit of future ...


6

The only likely advantage to applying early is that you won't run into unexpected events that make it difficult to meet the deadline, and that this could improve the quality of your application (especially the written/essay portions) as well as avoid simply failing to meet the deadline at all. That said, this can be a very valuable advantage. You'll find a ...


1

Probably there is very little advantage. Committees are likely to only start considering candidates after the deadline anyway. Likewise not much disadvantage in being close to the deadline as long as you beat it. The committee will be made up (almost) entirely of faculty who want to schedule time and get through the pile of applications.


0

Consider this. A PhD dissertation advisor has one to a few PhD students, and their salary is somewhere in the range of 100k to 200k USD per year. Advising PhD students is a higher level work and may be considered, as a matter of an abstract principle, more challenging or meritorious than teaching a course. While 44,000 USD per year is probably somewhat on ...


1

I think you are missing some key text from the prompt. I searched the exact text you did include, and found a prompt posted elsewhere that seems to match. It might not be the exact full prompt you were given, but please read yours carefully. Here's the text I found posted by another applicant here... Bold is added by me. Applicants for our graduate ...


5

"How your perspectives or activities contribute to social or cultural diversity and/or make you sensitive to the experiences of underrepresented groups" I think a useful way to approach this question is to not think about it in terms of race, but instead consider what it means to be socially diverse. As an example, consider this brief response to the ...


-4

This question suggests you are not prepared for doctoral study at the University of California. Sign yourself up for a diversity training program. In my opinion, the prompt is code for "Tell us how you will work effectively with people who are different from you." Answer that appropriately for the context of your discipline, and you will be okay.


-2

I got my Ph.D. from a small university in Northern Ontario (Canada). I have been working in the private sector and know very little about getting into academia. To the best of my understanding, your likelihood of success is determined by the quality of your publication record. Then the pedigree of your education comes second. I've found there is always ...


0

Let me suggest a few things. First, having some teaching experience is useful for most beginning academics. So a TA has value in itself. It shouldn't be hard to "sell" that. However, the professor now funning you has no input into who is a TA. That is normally a department decision. You apply there for a position, not to a particular professor. You may have ...


Top 50 recent answers are included