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0

My advice would be to leave it out. It's probably a mild negative, as is your age. (In a theoretical world, it shouldn't matter, but I am discussing reality.) You're not under any compulsion to volunteer this information and I would not bother. Again, I would say the concern/issue is mild. You'll be fine. Many people end up getting married (some ...


11

I doubt that you will find any general problem in the US, though it is possible that some individual professors might take issue. Some labs, for example, expect long continuous hours at the bench. I don't know of laws in the US governing this, but there may be some. There are tons of grad students with children. I had two kids in the final years of my ...


5

Expanding on my comment to make it an answer. Department chairs deal with this all the time, and have to figure out which complaints are legit and which are students complaining as an excuse. I've seen several courses of action. Do nothing. If the student's complaints don't seem reasonable or seem out of character for that instructor, it's a waste of time ...


2

It's fine for the professor to use an email address and letterhead from the college where the professor works now.


6

I think that is pretty unlikely, as long as the professor is honest in what they say. I'm assuming, of course, that these letters go to various places, not all the same. But, if everyone is applying to the same university and gets the same letter, few will succeed. But that is at least partly because the number of open slots is limited. I think this should ...


0

Argentina. I did my BA for free there. And my MA almost for free.


1

The short answer is that it depends. Some will support your visa application others will accept international students only if they already hold a visa (sometimes a specific type of visa).


0

All official participants in NSF REU programs must be US citizens or permanent residents per the NSF REU homepage: Undergraduate students supported with NSF funds must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States or its possessions. A self-funded student or non-NSF REU funded student would simply be an intern or student at the host institution....


0

Well, know this. you can't do anything if the student is just waving his head. you can only warn him/her to pay attention on their jobs; but you can't give zeros to them. because 'just waving the head' isn't a reliable reason. It may the student say I have neckache! (but in fact he/she is cheating) and you can't prove the cheating. you can only assign zeros ...


0

Off the top of my head: The European CVs I've seen typically include a photograph of the person; that is more the exception than the rule in US-style CVs.


1

"Talk to the professor first" is the norm in most of the rest of the world, but in many graduate programs in STEM in the US admissions decisions are made by a graduate admissions committee and students are matched to research supervisors (and funding sources) after they've been admitted to the program. It's quite common to have some specialized source of ...


-1

There is an argument that cheating should be clearly and formally forbidden, but it is not important to enforce that. The reasoning is based on that the student does harm only to himself. While enforcing it is not fundamentally important, it may still be desirable to enforce it, but with lower priority when short on resources. The base assumption may or ...


4

I experienced a related situation when I was supervising a written exam as TA: I caught a student cheating who actually (though probably accidentally) admitted cheating ("I couldn't read anything" - yea but already trying to read other's answers is cheating). When telling my prof, he decided to nevertheless have the exam graded regularly. His explanation: ...


31

Beer and Circus calls this the "student-faculty non-aggression pact": Faculty provide an easy class and don't look too hard into cheating Students happily take the easy grade and leave the professor free to do research I wouldn't say this is "the rule"; plenty of faculty do an awesome job teaching. But, I'm not surprised to hear your report -- some faculty ...


7

Edit: question has changed. You probably cannot do much now. Once I realized what was happening, I started assigning zeros to the offending students, in accordance with University policy. As a TA, you should have spoken to the professor about the situation before taking any action. Student misconduct is squarely in the professor's area of ...


2

For any reasonable understanding of the terms, French public Universities are open admission and free. To give a bit more details, one is allowed to enroll in a university provided one has a high-school degree. At the moment, about 80% of high-school students eventually succeed at getting the required high-school degree. Even without such a degree, there ...


2

List them anywhere reasonable rather than not listing them at all. Probably you can give short descriptions so that there is no misunderstanding. But let the reader judge the significance rather than assuming that they aren't worth listing. Err on the "say more" side rather than "say less". And, if you can send a Statement of Purpose, mention there how ...


10

I can mention the case of Argentina. All public universities are free, with open admission since the early 1980s. Anyone with a high school diploma (and there's no comprehensive final exam, or qualifying exam, etc. after high school) that applies gets in, including foreigners that have residency (which is super-easy to get). There is a limited possibility ...


1

Not sure if something hasn't changed in the last years, but it has been like that in Latvia since 1991(regain of independence): There is a (fairly large) number of state sponsored slots in 2-4 major state universities. To qualify for those slots, you have to be above the threshold in entrance exam results. The threshold depends on the number of ...


2

I'm going to offer an answer, partly from the U.S. perspective, highlighting information gathered in the comments, chat, and other answers. In both Europe and at U.S. lower-level (community) colleges, entry to the college usually requires a high school diploma and no other qualifications. However, the "quality control" that I would expect for the European ...


4

California isn't a country, but our community college system does have open admissions as well as being in effect free. It's free in the sense that all students receive at least an ~80% subsidy, and most are 100% subsidized. There are various programs that allow students to completely get free tuition. There is a need-based program that something like half ...


14

I have taught at both at two Swedish universities and one American university (Ivy League). The main difference is really the philosophy - in the US, it is difficult to get in, but once admitted, it is not that hard to stay with passing grades. In Sweden, getting admitted is relatively easy (which implies a much more diverse body of students), but the ...


3

Scotland has free undergraduate full-time degrees, and the part-time distance-learning Open University has no entry requirements for most of its degrees (access courses are available for those who haven't studied up to age 18). And as far as I'm aware there are no limits on student numbers. http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/do-it/ready-for-success Scottish ...


29

Well, it depends how strict you are with the terms "open" and "free": Open: Most European countries I am familiar with (Austria, Germany, Sweden, Switzerland) are actually fairly open in terms of admission. There are always some basic requirements (e.g., candidates need to have a high school diploma or comparable), and sometimes there are entry ...


44

Here is an overview of the situation in Germany, where there are no tuition fees for Bachelor and Master programs at public universities (though student union fees and public transport fees totaling 60-130 EUR per semester still apply). For Bachelor degrees, the general requirements for admission to any German university are (1) proof of knowledge of the ...


11

I studied in the United States (bachelor's and PhD). In my school, it was very common practice to list "TBA" (to be announced) for course professors, especially undergraduate courses. Through my years in the university, including becoming a part-time instructor myself as a PhD student, I got to know that it was pretty much always a logistic issue. Even if ...


2

Think about your audience. They are asking this question because they want to know how you'll contribute to the teaching of the department. Only listing the title of the course would provide a little information (what you'll teach), but probably not all of what they're listening for (how you'll teach or how your teaching interests will fit in their ...


7

Let me go out on a limb and assume that the question you really want answered is twofold. Can I do this? How? In the US, the essential core of a doctorate is the ability to pass a set of qualifying exams and production of an acceptable dissertation. I got my degree from a place where those were actually the only requirements. Yes, there is a lot of ...


2

PhD programs in the US very often are combined master+PhD programs with a planned duration of 2+3 years. In maths and computer science it is also very common that people take exactly that time. The horror stories you heard are more common in lab sciences like physics or chemistry. If you already have a masters degree you might find programs that allow you ...


1

I'm in a similar position. I'm a junior (also at a well known university) at 15, set to graduate at about 17 years old. I'm also working in the field of AI, with 3-4 publications to my name, one first authorship, in good journals and conferences. I've also done a couple of internships (though this is not so relevant to PhD applications). When I entered ...


0

Every university in the U.S. has different policies regarding each element of your/your son's predicament. Some accept students into Ph.D. programs immediately from undergrad; some only accept into Masters programs; some accept into Ph.D. programs provisionally-- that is, they must meet some benchmark of performance at some point during their first few years ...


4

Hiring committees do care about how many years it’s been since you got your PhD, but they more-or-less don’t care at all about what happened before you received your PhD. I think you’ve misunderstood what people meant by “younger.” I took 7 years in grad school and it caused no issues whatsoever.


3

I think that most places would ignore your age. In some places age discrimination is frowned upon, and can be illegal, though usually for much older applicants. But frowned upon in any case. The few places that might are acting foolishly since it is your accomplishments and likelihood of success that should be the determining factor. If you are in a ...


5

I'm going to give a Canada specific answer. Since your son is Canadian, I'd highly recommend that he do a MSc before pursing a PhD. There are a few reasons for this: A PhD is a long, huge, often painful commitment, and someone who is 18 might not know what they want to do with their life. If he decides he'd rather do industry than academia, an MSc will ...


0

Are these people identical twins? Presumably despite having similar “profiles” they are distinct human beings each with their own name, personality, interests, and goals. The superficial fact that they come from the same undergraduate institution seems totally irrelevant from the point of view of a professor or graduate admissions committee. So basically ...


2

Don't confuse the purpose of the CV with that of the SoP. The former looks to the past, what you have already accomplished. The Statement of Purpose, on the other hand looks to your future and what you expect to do in the future, both in future schooling and beyond. Together they provide a more complete picture. So, I suggest that you only mention your ...


-3

First may I say what a legend your son is. For context, I'm a funded PhD student in the UK and I'm currently VP Lead Cloud Engineer for the central banking and regulatory arm of Barclays Bank (a division known as RFT). I also advise the UK government on national security strategy and countermeasures to cyberwarfare affecting critical infrastructure. At the ...


1

Currently a CS PhD student in the US in a highly-ranked program. Anecdotally, there is a student in our department who just started at age 18 and is fully funded. I can't speak to how Canada's departments will view such an application, but I can't imagine it would be any different than here based on my interactions with faculty there. As mentioned in @Pete L....


2

I assume you are asking if the two are in competition with one another. Yes, of course, but they are also in competition with everyone else who applies. If the pool is large then there will, potentially, be a lot of very similar applications. It is likely, but not required that they get the same result. Both accepted, or both rejected is more likely than ...


0

@Buffy pointed this out in their comment, but allow me to expound on what getting a PhD in the sciences in the U.S. looked like financially. Getting into a PhD program in the US in a well-funded field like biology, chemistry, physics, computer science, engineering, mathematics, physical and mental health studies that are funded by the National Institute of ...


11

The other answers speak effectively to the general case, and I agree with them, but thought an answer focusing on the specifics might be relevant too. I suspect you are already aware of the strong parallels between your son's case, and that of another Canadian student with an interest in computer science, Erik Demaine, who was admitted into a funded PhD ...


0

Why so much emphasis on "best worldwide"? Any ranking system involves averages over many things and all sorts of contributions. The only important factor in the "quality" of a program is the quality of your program. Namely the strength of your advisor and the conditions that the program provides for you to be a success. Maybe the best professor to guide you ...


75

[For context: I am a professor of mathematics at the University of Georgia. I've served on my department's Graduate Committee, which does graduate admissions, for about eight years. From 2016-2019 I was the Graduate Coordinator, hence the faculty member most directly involved in the graduate admissions process.] Regarding your son, you told us: 1) He is ...


24

I strongly recommend that your son (or you) speak with the professor he is working with at his university for guidance on your questions. With that being said... With regards to funding age restrictions, it should not be an issue. Also, funding for CS PhD programs (at least in the United States and Cananda) is almost always guaranteed with acceptance and is ...


3

Most of the other answers here don't really address the professor's situation. The professor may be feeling significant pressure to deliver results, especially if he does not yet have tenure. This means, in part, having students like yourself graduate and deliver good quality research. He may be in denial about the fact that your planned experiments were ...


3

There are many replies above, with excellent advice for you. However something that is missing above, I would like to add here. I was exactly in the same situation 10 years ago (Germany) - funding finished but professor was asking for more; visa was linked to studies and without funding I couldn't continue, so eventually dropped out! I can suggest you ...


2

Depending on your program, most if not all recommend applying for external scholarships prior to acceptance into the program (as if you are already going to attend). For the big government scholarships, the application date for study beginning next Fall has already past, but provincial awards (such as OGS in Ontario) are open until early December. Internal ...


2

I'm guessing that the intent of this is to determine if you are in the somewhat rare case of not needing funding. If you can say that you will be funded from other sources (scholarships from another country, for example) then funding is one factor the committee need not consider. But if you need funding, then they also need to find ways to provide it if you ...


4

Unfortunately, situations like this are best resolved before they reach this stage. I think your path forward, given that you're already in this situation, is to speak with, in this order, Your committee the graduate program leadership in your department your department chair the graduate program leadership in your school a university problem solver, ...


6

I recall something like this happening with a fellow graduate student in my dept. The advisor kept wanting more. Just because the advisor wants more doesn't mean the advisor's position is reasonable. The student went to another member of the thesis committee for help, and was able to negotiate a resolution that led to graduation. My advice would be to ...


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