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2

This answer reflects a North American perspective at an R1 or R2 university - answers in other parts of the world may be different. If I saw someone who completed a PhD in two years I would want to know things like: What work did they do before their PhD? (Did their prior experience make the PhD faster?) What were the primary contributions of their PhD? (...


1

In many hiring circumstances, committees cannot and will not look at additional letters or any additional documentation that was not specifically asked for. If you send more than the required number or letters you risk having them selected at random, with additional ones tossed in the rubbish can. Your strongest and most relevant letter has a chance, then, ...


1

When reading references committee members evaluate them based on different evaluation criteria. Some place a lot of weight on the worst opinion voiced. In that respect, having more references than needed is a risky prospect. Another point to note is that you’re never 100% sure that all your referees write the most enthusiastic letter possible. For example, ...


2

Think about your audience. They are asking this question because they want to know how you'll contribute to the teaching of the department. Only listing the title of the course would provide a little information (what you'll teach), but probably not all of what they're listening for (how you'll teach or how your teaching interests will fit in their ...


-1

Yes, you can go over one page. In fact, most cover letters for faculty searches are 2 pages. Some people go over two pages, but I don’t think it is usually necessary.


4

Hiring committees do care about how many years it’s been since you got your PhD, but they more-or-less don’t care at all about what happened before you received your PhD. I think you’ve misunderstood what people meant by “younger.” I took 7 years in grad school and it caused no issues whatsoever.


3

I think that most places would ignore your age. In some places age discrimination is frowned upon, and can be illegal, though usually for much older applicants. But frowned upon in any case. The few places that might are acting foolishly since it is your accomplishments and likelihood of success that should be the determining factor. If you are in a ...


1

The two key criteria here are Familiarity with your work (research, teaching, service). You want them to provide details for how promising your research is, how you would work with colleagues, how you'd teach and mentor students, and so on. Familiarity with academic work (tenure-track or tenured professors > other kinds of recommendations). From the ...


2

Your letter writer will describe the relationship in the first paragraph of their letter. If you are not sure what they will say, then ask the letter writer. You should be saying the same thing they say.


5

Both don't seem like unusual "relationships" at all, so I don't think there should be any issue describing them just like you did here. If there is a drop-down list, you can select whatever is the most appropriate (presumably there are options amounting to "colleague at my current department" and "collaborator" - I think it counts as "collaborating" if you ...


5

I would just use made-up names, made obvious by using scarequotes on the first usage. Personally, I feel Alice and Bob is a little too generic (like a math problem). I would probably choose two from Renee, Sophia, Marcos, and Hans. Names with some interesting oomph to them. I would keep the sex the same. Not because gender is a part of the story (well ...


2

You could easily use alphabetically-sequential names, as we use in logic problems, communications, and so on. Typically this starts "Alice, Bob, Charlie", but you may wish to vary this for your paper if student gender is important. The sequence of names often also uses "Eve" in communications and cryptography, as an "eavesdropper". It would probably be more ...


33

I think you should avoid giving their full names, as opposed to just their first names unless they give permission for it. Better, using an alias for the students protects their privacy but doesn't cost you any thing in the telling of the stories. Alice and Bob, as usual. But some readers might actually wonder whether you were too personal with the ...


2

First, you should be aware that on-campus CS faculty interviews have already started. Yes, yes, I know that even the earliest application deadlines are still several weeks away, but at least in some departments (like mine), stellar candidates can be (and have been) invited to interview well before the application deadline. That said, you should not worry ...


1

The conference window is pretty small. I'm not sure why you'd be concerned. You should get, from any reasonable institution, some leeway in scheduling an interview. I think that is especially true in a case like this. Even more so if you were presenting, though you don't indicate that you are. And it might even turn out that some institutions will also ...


-2

What everybody on here is forgetting or not aware of, is that you can get unemployment during the off months if you are paid on a 9 months basis. That could add up to over $7500 a year if you make 60000 a year.


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