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7

Depends on your purpose. If your aim is to track the publications of a given academic then I would recommend these in the following order of preference. Some of these may surprise you: Google Scholar; Google Scholar seems to capture more publication outputs any other source. This is partly due to the scope they have for including different publication ...


2

While I stay away from social networks myself, I have a bunch of friends in academia who are very vocal on certain issues which attract the attention of all sorts of people, many of whom are idiots or really nasty human beings who try to interfere with my friends' lives and academic careers. So far, they are doing quite fine despite all the noise. If you ...


5

Besides asking them about more clear instructions, I would suggest having two separate sections in your CV: Teaching Experience Work Experience from that, it would be clear which positions are the teaching ones, and which are research/other. For this type of applications, it might not hurt to expand the Teaching Experience section with slightly more ...


3

From the wording, it sounds like the usual work experience section in the CV should be fine, but you should really contact them and ask. Always include a cover letter. Never hesitate to contact people who advertise jobs for more information. It can't hurt. If anything, it helps them remember who you are.


15

Often, people confuse the protections of the freedom of expression in various forms as protection from judgment by others rather than protections from government (and sometimes employer) sanction. In a free society, you have the right to express the things you want to express on social media (with a few key exceptions), but you do not have the right for that ...


3

I doubt that this will really be an answer, and might even add to your stress. I would rather sit down with you for a couple of hours and chat than try to capture all of this "advice from an old codger" in written form. First, an observation. If you work in a "hot" area of research, mathematics or other, you will be at a disadvantage with respect to ...


0

No. Most institutions would consider tenure denial to be a confidential personnel matter. This information probably cannot even be obtained using freedom of information laws. A small portion of institutions have their newly tenured faculty announced in Inside Higher Ed. You can estimate faculty retention rates by viewing archive.org's records of the ...


2

This depends on what you want your career to be like. At a "teaching-intensive" university or a Liberal Arts college, expect teaching to be much more highly valued than research, though you can't ignore the latter. This explains the small start-up funding. If you want, primarily, to teach, the position will probably serve you well. But if you really want ...


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