If you need help with online teaching or other challenges in academia arising from the COVID-19 crisis, we have prepared this FAQ to get you started.

New answers tagged

0

About ethics: Allowing this minor problem to cause a significant delay in publishing your article would be unethical because that would hamper scientific progress! 1) Yes, you should absolutely submit immediately, this is not the final version. It doesn't matter much if the acknowledgement is included in the version you submit now. Simply tell the editor ...


1

According to this Springer document The "Version of Record" is defined as the final version of the Work as originally published, and as may be subsequently amended following publication in a contractually compliant manner, by or on behalf of the Publisher.


1

A version of record is the article or contribution as published including copy editing and lay out. Source: Peter Davidhazi (2014) "New publication cultures in the humanities: exploring the paradigm shift."


1

Did you find a working solution? I am in the same position; most of my paper is about code and the output it generates. Psychological methods (an APA journal) has some instructions about this here: "If you would like to include code in the text of your published manuscript, please submit a separate file with your code exactly as you want it to appear, using ...


-1

In the journal’s own words, their policy is: Acknowledgements Please acknowledge anyone who contributed towards the article who does not meet the criteria for authorship including anyone who provided professional writing services or materials. Authors should obtain permission to acknowledge from all those mentioned in the Acknowledgements ...


2

Is this impending submission only the first stage in a long process that will include, for example, peer review? If so, there is no need to have secured the professor's permission at this point; it's just necessary that it be done sufficiently before publication, whenever that may be. And then, in the unlikely event you fail to get permission, you can strike ...


8

Logically, I think the wording from the journal, "obtain permission to acknowledge from all those mentioned" means that a non-response is a lack of permission. And even with all that's going on, two emails over 10 days seems to me to be a reasonable, good-faith attempt to gain permission. Since this relates to a software toolkit, however, the solution seems ...


12

I would submit the paper to get the process started, but send a note to the editor that Prof. X has not yet given permission to be named, though you have tried to contact him. The editor will make a decision. Perhaps the paper will be returned to you. Perhaps the decision to publish will be deferred, but review begun. Perhaps the editor will ask the person ...


0

The question specified that the journal does not only stipulate the authors "seeks" permission (which would imply asking is enough), but "obtains" permission. If you have not obtained the permission you should treat that fact as a refusal to give you permission. If somebody does not permit acknowledging them, indicate the fact that you received their ...


2

In most fields, there would be a great deal of difference between the bar for authorship and the bar for true equal contribution. In this situation, from your description, it seems that your co-author probably meets the bar for authorship, but of course not equal contribution. Below are some of your statements that were evidence for this, at least in my ...


2

It seems rather unusual, and I consider it bad style to use a descriptor that readers will not be able to figure out unless they consult the list of references. (With "first author" you can at least get a reminder by looking at the running header.) It is, of course, possible that the first author is indeed the senior author, and in the context of the journal ...


9

Is it common to make seniority distinctions between coauthors of a paper in math? This is uncommon. However it seems less unusual to refer to something one of the authors did, e.g.: In a previous result [2] by one of the authors, it is shown that ... or: This builds on prior work of the first author [3], namely, ... As Andrés E. Caicedo says in the ...


4

I'll guess that this is pretty uncommon, but the situation itself is a bit uncommon. Perhaps it is just that the senior professor is mentor to all of the others and they want to honor the person. It may well be that one person produces a key result that the others then explore, develop, and they put it all together. I did something similar (maybe even more ...


1

My paper was accepted in one of Elsevier's journal and it was recently published, but there is no pagination instead they have this "article number" for example "Volume 123, Article No. 212021" similar to those in some Springer and Royal Society journals. This is not concerning. As others have pointed out, the use of page numbers is outdated and unnecessary,...


9

I don't think I'd call it inappropriate, exactly, but I don't think it is the best way to word it. Your use of the word "arguably" signals that the phrase "progress has been made" is subjective - and in particular, it's a subjective opinion coming from a source that is clearly not impartial (you). Also, "progress has been made" is vague and not very ...


0

Why split the result into two papers since they are obviously quite closely related? It seems like salami-slicing and makes both papers weaker than they would otherwise be together. If it would be overlong to pack both voltage ranges into a single paper, you might consider putting the "worse than state of the art" range in the Supplemental Material, stating ...


2

However, I am debating how to publish the second part that on its own does not offer better performance than state-of-the-art. I have spent half a year developing, evaluating, and optimizing the circuit and I believe the engineering society would benefit from this work. (emphasis added) Why do you believe the engineering society would benefit from it? What ...


4

Perhaps it would result in a paper that is too long to publish, but you might consider, at least, putting the two results into the same paper and giving an analysis of each case. Show how and why it works for one range, but, in a later section, show why it fails to work for the other. The overall suggestion here is that the analysis of the result and the ...


2

phylopic.org has some great animal and plant silhouettes which can be used in your graphics under a Public Domain or Creative Commons license. For instance, silhouettes from phylopic are used in figures in these papers (sorry they might be paywalled): https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921818116301540#f0005 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/...


1

Benjamin provides some suggestions for graphics that do not require attribution, but I gotta ask - why not just attribute the ones you already have appropriately? In all sites that my students use it is completely acceptable to add a single sentence to the acknowledgements ("Icons in figures 3, 4 and 7 have been produced by user XYZ on ABC"). As long as ...


0

Just write saying that your article has been under review for a long time and ask for a status update. Don't overthink it. Editors see this kind of email all the time, enough so that they probably don't pay attention to the exact wording. Only thing is be sure to include the information necessary to identify the paper - e.g. the article ID number.


3

Pixabay.com and select Vector Graphics and use the search bar. Rawpic.com and search for your icons, make sure you then click 'free' and 'graphics' you will recieve 7 free downloads a day. If you need more just like their pinterest page and get 10 more. They both do not require attribution.


1

Having a poor relationship with your supervisor is a more important consideration than publishing an undergraduate thesis, I think. Perhaps you should address that in whatever way is open to you. If you contact a professor at another institution blindly, you are pretty unlikely to get much of any feedback. That is especially true currently due to the ...


3

Look for other magazines that don't require such a letter. (Do they all?) Find a professor that you can talk to. Or a postdoc. Or a visiting scholar. Some won't give you time of day, but some will be OK for a conversation. Then maybe talk about what you've done that was interesting. (Make some notecards and then be able to show/talk about the topics on ...


2

Scopus is quality-curated, i.e. getting indexed by it is not meaningless. However, it is not as selective as the Science Citation Index, which remains the gold standard. Therefore you are better off publishing in a SCI-indexed journal if you can. Arguing with your professor is unlikely to be a good idea in any case - they have much more experience than ...


2

'Dear Dr. Gasbag,' I am pursing a PhD in the field of offensive odors and recently had the pleasure of reading your interesting 1978 paper, "On The Origins of Stomach Gas." I am sure you are very busy with your research, but I wonder if I might call or correspond with you to briefly discuss some aspects of your work and to gain clarity on a few points in ...


2

There are popular magazines and some (semi) professional ones that might be appropriate for such things, but it is less likely that any scientific journal would be interested. For this reason, it is unlikely that such an article would do much for a scientific reputation. But for a person in industry, it might give them some visibility that might help in a ...


2

As someone early-career (about to be a postdoc) who has a few first-author papers, I would be delighted if someone emailed me about them! Except a predatory journal... I hate predatory journals... but anything else, even an email from a 3rd grader asking what a p-value is, would make me very happy because it means someone read my paper! The only scenario ...


2

Some papers can't be "retracted" if they have been printed and widely distributed. Corrections can be issued in some journals. But, another way to correct the record is to attempt at least to publish another paper updating and citing the old paper. Spell out the errors in the original. You may or may not want to say why this happened. However, such a ...


4

Not every published paper is right. Publications are a snapshot of authors' understanding at a given time. If they don't stand up to history, the literature corrects itself. Descartes's publications on the pineal gland as the generator of motor actions have never been retracted! If a paper is wrong because new data or new understanding has changed the ...


7

Book authors are not some kind of demi-gods whom you cannot look in the eye. If someone writes a book, pushes some code on GitHub, write a blog post or whatever is public - you can contact them. Some of them will be delighted and they will answer with joy. Some of them will be happy but do not have the time to answer. They may send a short note, or answer ...


1

Assuming you want to be helpful to the readers (without regard for pleasing the authors of the cited articles), this depends on whether you are writing a guide to the literature, or merely explaining facts and results. A guide to the literature should include many sources, while saying something useful on these sources. An explanation of facts and results ...


4

My main issue is that I fear if the author might consider my doubt something "too basic". Is that really a problem? Virtually everyone I've met has not felt "too basic" questions are not worth answering. Think about your own work and the questions you might get from your children/nieces/nephews/parents. They're likely to be too basic. They might not even be ...


14

I agree with all the other posters. (Go ahead, ask!) Two additional points: You might not get a response; sometimes, non-urgent emails get lost in the shuffle. (Especially now, with the sudden shift to online teaching.) If this happens, try not to worry about it. I'd avoid the word "doubt". It suggests (to me, anyway) that you believe there's a mistake in ...


-1

td, lr: Use the .pdf set up «printer ready». Check the .pdf generated to contain all text, all tables (if applicable), all illustrations (if applicable, in color [if applicable]) and all literature references to be present, in the order of consecution as the journal wants, and all completely readable. Then print it on paper (because the screen output may ...


3

I recommend you submit PDF, for two reasons: Only PDF gives you full control over the formatting of the document as received by peer reviewers; Those who are accustomed to typesetting in LaTeX (of which I suspect there are a fair few in your field) may be biased against authors using Word. Admittedly a Word document with default formatting settings could ...


0

There's no better - they both work. What is "better" is what is more convenient for you. For example if you're not proficient at Microsoft Word, you're better off using something else (like TeX) to generate a PDF file, and submitting that.


75

By all means ask. A person who goes through the trouble of writing up lecture notes, is almost certainly a person who would be happy to answer. As someone who receives a lot of questions from PhD students myself, here are a couple of pointers for how to phrase your question. This could be obvious to you, but I know for sure that it is not obvious for ...


22

The author says to email them, so email them. You’re overthinking this. You would be using their publicly listed email address for exactly its intended purpose. In general, people who prefer not to contacted by PhD students who have questions about their work will find a way to make that known or to avoid receiving such questions. Leave it to those people (...


5

Yes it is fine to send such an email. If it is polite and/or phrased in the form of a question you might be more likely to get a reply than otherwise. Errors happen. The authors generally want them corrected. But it is also possible that you have misunderstood something, of course. It is also a way to establish a relationship for the future, provided ...


2

It won't harm if you include the web address of his/her current institution in addition to his LinkedIn profile address. Depending on the scientific field, a publisher this huge as Elsevier has boards of editors from many countries where English is not the primary mean of communication, too; so his site may be accessible for them. (Even if written in an ...


2

If a journal wanted to impose such a rule they would most likely state it plainly. But I think that is very unlikely. It isn't the qualifications of the authors of a paper that make it important, but what the paper actually has to offer. Of course, editors like to know that the authors know what they are writing about, but that is the job of the reviewers to ...


0

There is unlikely to be a written rule stating the requirement of a PhD holder in the journal policy. There are two possible explanations for this action: (1) The editor felt the need to desk-reject based on reasons other than author qualification (relevance to journal for instance), and simply asked for the title so that the rejection mail would address ...


3

If you prove a theory or find an interesting or useful relationship using 100 year-old data you can publish, that is send to a journal for review. It is not the age of the data but the results / analysis / conclusions.


2

Do not try to rearrange or paraphrase, but write in your own words. How do you do it: Read what you need to read. Think about it. Write it down again (without looking at the original source). It takes more time than paraphrasing/rearranging, but it is worth the effort. You see if you really understood the topic and also you may discover that you have ...


2

It may be impossible to get a change made, but a possible approach would be to contact the program chair of the conference (or the conference chair if necessary) and ask for advice. They will know what is possible and what is not. But it is also likely that the errors are merely a nuisance and not fatal to the work. It hasn't been a long time, yet, but ...


1

Is there a way...I can correct them? No, published works cannot (generally) be changed. (You can fix typos in copies distributed elsewhere, e.g., e-prints on arxiv.)


0

No. Don't break a caption over the pages. I am a fan of very explanatory figure captions. One to two sentences is fine. Figure captions are THE MOST READ parts of the text of a paper. Pay special attention to them. But 300 words is WAY too much. I would keep it under 25 normally and never over 150 (which is a normal, not over-long, paragraph). You ...


0

This is not that unusual a situation. One sometimes sees a full-page figure, with the (full) caption on the facing page. I suspect this is less common than it used to be: back in the days where figures went on expensive 'colour plates', there was an incentive to maximise the area occupied by figure rather than text. I think it is less common to see the ...


0

You can: Reduce the size of the figure or caption, move part of the caption into the body, split the figure into two independent figures, include the figure inline, or something similar. (I favor inclusion of the figure inline as opposed to the figure caption running to the next page.)


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