New answers tagged

8

It depends entirely on the journal. There are good and bad open access journals, just as there are good and bad closed access journals. For example, in biology Nature Communications, Cell Reports, eLife, PLoS Biology and Genome Biology are all open access journals with excellent reputations. PLoS One, BMC genomics, PeerJ, Scientific Reports are open access ...


6

For academic reputation purposes, publishing in a reputable open access journal is fine. I'm assuming that the journal goes through a proper review and editorial process and that papers might be rejected for quality or innovation reasons. Otherwise, it may be a predatory journal that just wants your money and will publish anything. But it is the reputation ...


8

If you gave up your copyright then get it back. If you still hold copyright then you can publish it elsewhere. Even if the issue weren't cancelled, but they put out a call for additional papers to replace the removed ones, the time to "print" would probably be about the same for you as submitting to a different journal. It is unfortunate (and ...


0

My take is that yes metrics count but people often overlook the kind of engagement (and, often the citations) that you get from relevance over ranking. Personally I would consider: The relative rating or impact factor of the journal compared with others relevant to the same field; and The relevance of your material to what the journal typically publishes ...


2

Most people would base their decision on: The relative rating or impact factor of the journal compared with others relevant to the same field; and The relevance of your material to what the journal typically publishes and their audience. The citations you are likely to get will be influenced by both the profile of the journal and the relevance of the ...


0

Most people would base their decision on: The relative rating or impact factor of the journal compared with others relevant to the same field; and The relevance of your material to what the journal typically publishes and their audience. The citations you are likely to get will be influenced by both the profile of the journal and the relevance of the ...


3

Will publishing all my papers in a single journal endanger my career? If it is not one of the very top journals in the field If you have more than ten publications And all the publications are in the same journal Then yes, it will endanger your research career. Your research career is based on your reputation as a researcher. If you only publish in one ...


1

Most people would base their decision on: The relative rating or impact factor of the journal compared with others relevant to the same field; and The relevance of your material to what the journal typically publishes and their audience. The citations you are likely to get will be influenced by both the profile of the journal and the relevance of the ...


8

It turns out that someone put out a bibliometric analysis of publication characteristics in mathematics papers this month, which is very convenient for answering the question! Richard & Sun (2021). Bibliometric analysis on mathematics, 3 snapshots: 2005, 2010, 2015. arXiv:2102.06831 They found a general increase in the number of authors per paper over ...


3

Your first few papers don't determine your career. The answer to the title question is, of course, "it depends". If your research focus is narrow, especially narrow, then there are fewer journals that are appropriate venues and the others won't have appropriate reviewers in their "stable". But continuing to publish in a very low impact ...


4

If you perceive other researchers only as adversaries and competitors who encroach on “your” territory, then I strongly suspect your definition of what it means to “do good research” is fundamentally different than that of actual good researchers. A true good researcher does not worry about running out of things to work on, because they understand that the ...


5

Broadly speaking there are three reasons to do research: To push the boundaries of human knowledge forward for the betterment of humanity Because you personally find it interesting and exciting and rewarding Because the knowledge gives an organisation a competitive advantage over another organisation. (Note these are not mutually exclusive) If you are in ...


25

While I agree with previous comments, I believe that your question indicates, respectfully, a misunderstanding of the scientific endeavor. The entire point of scientific publishing is to have your work noticed by others and for them to build on it. This is what drives science forward. The vast majority of great scientists worked with a large group of ...


3

Ben said it best. Let me add a couple pieces of information: The world is vast, and you never know what everyone else is working on. There may be one or multiple people out there duplicating your foundational work right now. Publishing now frees them to pursue more useful, non-redundant work. Also, if you care at all about recognition, publishing first gets ...


47

The prospect of getting "scooped" in extensions to your research project is rarely a big problem, because you always maintain a head-start on others through the period of time it takes for a paper to go from completion and submission to a journal to publication. Even if your paper is extremely well-written in the first instance, there is usually ...


45

Sure, all you have to do is not publish your work.


27

No: Authorship is governed by the number of contributing mathematicians, rather than some arbitrary limit.


1

I assume that "Email was verified" refers to the verified academic email address and not the GMail address associated with your account, since that is the only extra verification step asked by Google Scholar that I know of. Then, the following should likely work: Log in to the old account, and click on the pencil icon near your profile photo to ...


30

Here's how academic publishing works. You write the paper. Your peers review it for free. The journal charges people to read the paper to cover copy-editing/hosting costs, and to make a profit. You write a paper. Your peers review it for free. The journal charges you to cover copy-editing/hosting costs, and to make a profit, then gives it away for free. ...


1

As @Franck notes, people can access a publication without incrementing an official journal counter. These include: (a) pre-print server, (b) personal website, (c) institutional repositories, (d) sites like ResearchGate, and (e) indexing services that provide paid and independent full-text access such as EBSCOHost. Sci-hub simply adds one more source where ...


1

In my experience, these kinds of pictures are usually created using the LaTeX package TiKZ. An example collection of what can be done with TiKZ and how is available here: https://texample.net/tikz/examples/


9

Note the inconsistency. The exact way of doing this will depend on the style or publication guide you are using. This idea comes from the APA Style Blog, where Timothy McAdoo suggests noting an unintentional typo using a footnote: Linn, L. (1968). Social identification and the seeking of pyschiatric1 care. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 38, 83–88. ...


12

Without sufficient reputation, I cannot post this as a comment; so here we go in an answer... I apologise! 'Beweis einer Baudetschen Vermutung' is orthographically incorrect, as 'Baudetschen' is an adjective and should therefore be written using a lowercase 'b' as 'baudetschen'. If this adjective, however, is derived from a name, it can be written as 'Baudet'...


2

For a research manuscript with a digital object identifier (DOI), associated metadata may provide a title. Alternatively, and for research manuscripts without DOIs, a publisher's table of contents, index, etc. may provide a title. The actual title assigned by the author(s) may differ, and a publisher's usage may vary, hence, there's no "official" ...


84

You get absolutely nothing. When you submitted the paper to the conference, you (very much likely) transferred the copyright of your paper to the publisher retaining just a couple of rights, but not that of being paid by the publisher.


240

You get nothing: Welcome to academic publishing.


1

It depends on the reason for the differences. Often, especially with multi-disciplinary work, one reviewer will not have the knowledge required to assess every aspect of the paper. The editors may pick reviewers from several different specialties so that between them, they can cover the whole work. In that case, getting one "major revisions" and ...


6

As far as you are concerned, your work cannot be accepted in current form but may be if you address the comments raised by the reviewers. (A good editor will make this explicit and expand on what they require and what they recommend.) The question of "major" vs. "minor" is mostly internal (between reviewers and editor) and has two basic ...


1

Arithmetica is an Ancient Greek text on mathematics written by the mathematician Diophantus in the 3rd century AD. It is out of copyright but why should you get it for free? Either someone has to print it (they have to make a physical copy, and make a profit in order to stay in business), or they have to maintain a website that make such texts available. ...


1

No. Hundreds of values is too many for a table in a PDF document. Imagine the frustration of someone trying to convert those numbers to a spreadsheet. Depending on the situation, you might choose to present the values as: A plot A table in a CSV file A database Any of which could be published by the journal or a repository. In some cases summary ...


14

It's up to the editor to make the decision. Their job is to read the reviews and decide if the criticism is substantial enough to justify a major revision. If the editor is lazy, they might resort to shortcuts, such as: follow the least favorable recommendation, or take the average of all recommendations. But that is a poor practice.


3

Talk to your editor. Their job is to help you disseminate supplemental information, while keeping paper to style and readable. As Libor mentions in comments, modern journals accept wide range of supplemental materials, and either will host the files (CSV) or suggest the ways to deposit it


3

In general there are two issues. For a number of years, there may be copyright restrictions on what you're allowed to do with the paper or writing, even if you had free open access to a copy of it. After copyright expires, you can do.pretty much what you like with it - but you may find you can't get hold of a copy of the paper without paying, or other ...


4

The use of pattern, per Alberto Casas Ortiz, is a great solution. It appears that, for each group defined by prior knowledge (excellent, good, poor), the # (Sources x Detectors) increases (the vertical axis) in every category of Number of Voxels. As the number of voxels increases, the # (Sources x Detectors) goes up in each group defined by prior knowledge....


6

@Buffy gives good advice on the copyright situation. As far as downloading that particular paper and using it for free goes, you need wait no longer: the Biodiversity Heritage Library has a copy here.


35

From your question: This is an article published more than 150 years ago. How long do I have to wait in order to download it and use it for free? From a comment you posted: Yes, I know I do still have to cite it, but I can't download it or use it for free. I have to pay even when it was published in the 19th century As Buffy and anpami note, the original ...


0

You have a good chance of being considered for admission, but the set of schools you tag is so small and the competition so fierce that it isn't very likely to happen. There will be lots of other applicants who also have excellent records and not so many slots as to make decisions easy. But, you have a shot at least, so apply. But broaden your search also, ...


17

Well, regardless of the actual copyright situation, you can get it for free even now. Just use the DOI (10.1017/S0080456800032117) and use it at a, erm, (possibly not 100% legal) "Black Open Access" site called Sci-Hub. (The domain changes constantly, but it currently seems to be this one). As regards a legal response, my guess is the following: ...


10

In the US, at least, nothing published in the 19th century is likely to still be under copyright. See https://www.copyright.gov/help/faq/faq-duration.html. For the UK it is similar but very slightly longer in a few cases. See: https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/library/copyright/duration. Other places will differ, but probably not by a lot and most likely a shorter ...


7

This seems unlikely. I doubt that an editor of a reputable journal would accept it, knowing the details. And it would be an ethical lapse to obscure the details, of course. You can, however, write an extension of the old work, citing it as usual. But the new results would have to stand on their own to pass review. If they don't, then an option is to continue ...


0

As I could not find a satisfactory answer, I tried an alternative approach. This is what I came up with: You can also browse through the results at https://ooir.org/journals/. The methodical approach was, first, to obtain all publishers names that had supposedly at least 50 journals according to either DOAJ, Publons, Scopus or Sherpa Romeo. Secondly, I ...


2

You will need to speak to your advisor about this matter, but if the paper is relevant to your research (and it certainly sounds like it is) then you are correct in your view that it should be incorporated into your thesis. If one week is insufficient to do this, I recommend you seek an extension for submission from your supervisory panel. It should not be ...


4

It is next to impossible not to be affected emotionally by a rejection of a paper. You put in a lot of time, effort and hard work, so it is a perfectly natural reaction to have a short term issue with motivation. There is no need to suppress this, and it will include quite a bit of frustration if rejections keep happening. One of the more important things ...


3

This graph looks like it would be a lot more readable as a line graph: Image source


12

If you don't want to use colors, you could use patterns instead. Here is an example: Image Source


1

Pretty much any activity gets easier with practice. Research is no different. I suggest that as research gets easier for you, you should get more ambitious.


0

When was the paper released? If it is very new (few months old), then maybe it won't be considered a big mistake. (because it is "just" a thesis) But the evaluation of the whole thing depends on how strict your supervisor is. So ask them. Question: is there any minor difference in the hypothesis/experiment design between your thesis and the paper? ...


1

This is up to your advisor and any committee that is involved in accepting the thesis and or the completion of your degree. "Only four citations" doesn't sound like a good thing, however. If I were on your committee I would wonder whether this is parallel work, and hence fine, or if you should have seen this paper a while ago and adapted to it. It ...


1

Since you will inform everyone about the situation, there are no further ethical concerns. You need to cite the earlier work in the later one as usual, of course. And the submission to the conference may be accepted there or not, depending on the judgements of others. You are making it possible for that to be an informed judgement, so all is well. The ...


3

I suggest that you inform the editor immediately of the problem. Some publishers will act on your behalf to obtain (and possibly pay for) copyright license. It is worth an ask. But the editor needs to be informed in any case. Don't delay. You would need their permission to delete as it may affect the readability of the paper. And the solutions suggested by ...


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