New answers tagged

4

The point of having affiliations in papers is to indicate where the person currently is based. That space is not a historical track of where the paper has been written (which would be entirely confusing... "so, where is this person now?"). Having said this, it is healthy to add somewhere else an acknowledgement to people and institutions that have been ...


1

First of all, I'd say this question is off-topic here, because it relates more to statistics than academia as a whole. In any case the answer by Janosch is accurate, when doing a statistical test, an observation is either significant or not. Sometimes people use stars to annotate the level of significance a particular result would be able to clear, for ...


5

To the best of my knowledge, you would need to somehow indicate both but a similar question has been asked and answered before: What affiliation to put on an academic paper for alumni authors? You have to acknowledge that part of the work was performed when you were at your university. I had a similar situation where I did part of the work when I was at ...


0

You dont. Either a p-value is below your alpha and than you consider it significant or if it is above your alpha level you don't. But there is no such thing as "more significant". Regarding the Bonferroni Correction. If you do multiple testing than you need to correct your alpha values/p_values. It should not be based on whether you would lose other ...


1

It sounds completely justifiable to be the first coauthor. Depending on how much work the drafts needed you may even qualify to be the first author. If the experimental data was near-useless, the ideas half-baked and you needed to do most of the heavy lifting you could definitely argue that. Something like this happened to me during my PhD. A colleague who'd ...


2

If the co-author is fine with the content of the paper, then submitting it without his/her knowledge isn't that big a deal - (s)he's likely to approve anyway. I'm guessing that this (point 3 in the case listed by COPE) is a big part of the reason why half the Forum suggested the editor do nothing. Another big part could be that the paper has apparently ...


4

Usually, nothing happens, except damage to the submitting author's reputation. Anything could happen. It depends on the coauthor's feeling and the content of the paper. If the content of the paper is objectionable, then this might lead to retraction. Potentially the submitting author could be fired. But most likely, if a coauthor complains, the ...


3

Yes, of course you can ask. But in some fields there are other considerations that are considered important and first authorship is assigned for reasons not obvious to people from other fields. Sometimes those reasons are just political, but people go along with them to keep peace. It might also be necessary to keep the peace with a supervisor who has ...


1

I don't understand the basis of your worry unless you signed a non-disclosure agreement as part of your internship. Don't assume that everyone hearing of your research, even in some detail, will immediately want to (or could) try to scoop you on a publication. People generally are more honest than that. But it is, I think, fairly easy to discuss research ...


2

Many times, you receive comments such as:I am unable to accept your manuscript for publication in "Journal name" The reason for this decision is that in its current state, the level of English throughout your manuscript does not meet the journal's required standard. The work was revised thoughtfully and reach reviewing stage in higher impact journal but was ...


2

You seem to be asking if it is possible that due to your affiliation, your paper is rejected for bogus reasons. While this cannot be ruled out with certainty, such cases should be very rare in reputable journals. Reviewers are advised to only take the scientific content and the clarity of the presentation into account. It is quite common that a ...


14

My best advice is to be very upfront about the fact that 1.) You found some relations in your data that were not apart of your original hypotheses you were interested in testing. 2.) These results relations were still interesting enough to share, although the evidence should be taken with a grain of salt. Because these relations were found spuriously, ...


2

Open source software is used everywhere. For all example, nearly all of High Performance Computing, and the entire field of Computational Science and Engineering (CS&E) works with open source software, and does so very successfully. Furthermore, these packages are often at least as good or better than what commercial packages can offer. Many of these ...


1

Of course it’s also possible to have Zero the Hero, Department of Nothing and Institute of Heroes, Gong University or else you can have your “old” address on the byline with a footnote to your new address: Zero the Hero*, Department of Nothing, Gong University (* now at Institute of Heroes, Gong University ) The latter (and variations on this) is ...


1

This should be fine, so long as you're doing appropriate multiple hypothesis correction. Note in your manuscript what types of exploratory variables you evaluated for association, and how many of them there were. If your p-value is still significant after multiple hypothesis correction, that means there's still a stronger association than you'd expect by ...


43

Yes. I would have a separate section of your paper entitled something like "Further exploratory analysis", report what you did and what you found, and note that until a study has been design to specifically test your hypothesis, it remains a hypothesis, but suggest that it might be an attractive target for further study.


3

Others already told you: when a paper is written by that lab that uses your program, it will depend on how important an intellectual contribution you added to the subject of the paper. This comes in two "sizes": authorship for significant intellectual contribution or acknowledgement if your contribution was "merely" technical, i.e. you implemented the ...


0

Does it make sense to put both both affiliations, even though they are both linked to the same university? The publisher may require current department, university or just university For the latter, there's no choice for you to make. (Old department, university seems unlikely, since it is obsolete.) Regarding, it makes sense to acknowledge both ...


1

If the original institute provided funding or support for the research, I'd suggest keeping that as your affiliation. It may be just "noise" to list both, provided that anyone using the affiliation to contact you or disambiguate names will find you without both. The university will get your mail to the right place, I'd guess. I might want to list both if, ...


0

@reinstate-monica has already pointed out, these discussion are best happening before the work is done. However, for what its worth if you were in my lab, you would absolutely be an author on the paper. BUT .... this does mean would also expect you to be intellectually engaged with the project and prepare to offer feedback on the whole paper (including parts ...


2

Yes, open-source code can be used for research if it is cited everywhere you use results from it. You may first like to verify that the code is indeed open-source by verifying that the license is one of these: https://opensource.org/licenses This should be listed clearly on the website/repository/license/readme file. If this is not available, try contacting ...


12

You are absolutely able to publish the results of observational studies with no oversight, and this has been done before without university affiliation. However once you get into 'experiment' territory where human or animal subjects are manipulated in some way, all respectable journals require that you have informed consent or IACAUC review and approval. ...


-1

You'll need to conduct due diligence to ensure that the code generating the simulation is accurate and that you fully understand how it is working; otherwise other peoples' mistakes become your own. Personally, I would take that code and deconstruct it to the point I understand how it works, then re-write it on my own. That said, nothing prevents you from ...


65

Publishing papers about psychology experiments does present an additional issue, human subject research ethics. A reputable journal is likely to require assurance that the rights and welfare of the research subjects were protected during the research. If you were working or studying at a research university in many countries the university would have some ...


-9

Is it the same with experiments? Yes, assuming you have sufficient resources to conduct the experiment. How can I show my experiment was really made rigorously and I'm not faking documents and participants? How can I show the experiment really happened? how can I show I didn't induce some answers to the participants to prove my hypothesis? There are a ...


8

The Council of Science Editors has published a White Paper on Promoting Integrity in Scientific Journal Publications that gives a summary of research on authorship and attribution in scientific journals (see section 2.2 of the report). I recommend you begin by reading this material, to get an idea of the general principles for authorship and the required ...


2

The images you described does not seem too complex. You can either draw similar pictures yourself or ask someone to do it. For a skilled cartoonist it would probably take less time than you spent typing this question.


2

You can buy commercial images reasonably cheaply. These images are intended to be used in any kind of publication and licensed for such use. For example for £29 I can download 5 images, with a license to print up to 500,000 copies, and license to combine these images. Of course these images are under copyright, but practically everything is. Important is ...


8

As I pointed out in a comment this question can be answered from a lot of angles. On one level predatory journals exist because there's a demand for them. Where there is demand, someone will supply it, especially since it's profitable. One another level, people publish there for various reasons. Some people are genuine victims, but there's increasing ...


3

My publication list is divided into sections, which in your case could look something like this (add/delete as appropriate) Journal papers Peer reviewed conference papers Peer reviewed short comment Non-peer reviewed conference abstracts The section with the comment in it would list only one publication, but that's ok. I generally put "...


2

There are really two questions here: (1) Is the request ethical/fair? (2) Should you agree to the request? Unfortunately, these two can be quite independent, and we can only honestly answer the first. It is neither ethical nor fair, going by the information you've provided. Its safe to say that this would be a form of exploitation, even if it doesn't add to ...


0

You can describe the images, only in words, as another answer points out. Additionally, you can recreate them with appropriately licensed material. If it is a matter of showing the reader an example of what your subjects were shown, i.e., the contrast, colors, objects; you can then make another variant of this for the publication with an explanation that ...


39

If you’ve ever submitted a manuscript that was eventually rejected, you can understand why people will resort to this kind of publication. Publishing novel stuff is hard, and not everybody can do it. First there are the true crackpots who see the chance to finally tell the world about their pet theory. Friends have always told them they are really smart ...


65

We do not call them "vanity journals." We call them "predatory journals." They make their money from people who do not understand how journals work. Their customers do not know that anybody can set up their own fake journal website. The person who is fooled by the predatory journal might be the author, or it might be the person responsible for evaluating ...


5

I'd expand the entry, in my publication list, for the original paper by appending a reference to the reply. So the entry would look like: "List of authors, "Title of Paper", journal, volume (year), pages. See also "Title of reply", ibid., volume (year), pages."


6

This is hard to give good advice about without a lot of context. What is ethical and what is done (in some fields) don't necessarily match up well. In some fields, an advisor is often a co-author - even first author. If the other person has made no contribution to the paper then, ethically, the request is wrong. But you may need to accede to it just out of ...


15

Yes, but you would probably want to make separate lists of refereed and non-refereed publications. By putting the comment in the latter list, you do show that you engage with academic discussion, but you do not overclaim it as yet another refereed publication.


10

Generally you can put whatever you like in your CV. And generally the reader will judge whether it is a real thing or padding. If the reply is truly substantive then it might be worth including it (along with links to the comment you are replying to) so that a reader gets a more complete picture of the current state of the original publication. But I would, ...


2

From the SAGE link you provide: Conference abstracts, posters and presentations Subject to the journal's policy, manuscripts based on papers that have been presented at conferences may be considered for publication as long as they have not been published and provided that you still retain the rights to the manuscript. The journal editor may review ...


3

I would consider it, but only after having a talk with the student. In addition to the usual about background and research interests, I'd want to know about why it was abandoned and how we can have some assurance it won't occur again. But for many this might also depend on how much support the advisor was expected to give. In a situation in which a lot is ...


2

"Submitted manuscripts" count less, but are still viewed favorably. Uploading these to a preprint server and stating the preprint number is a plus. The only thing that could look strange are too many "manuscripts in preparation": a committee might wonder if you finish in time what you started.


2

For textbooks and self-published material, it is very good practice to follow a convention such as that proposed by Di Carlo, which is widely accepted as the general convention in mathematics. However, it sounds like are talking about a submission to a conference to be collated and published as conference proceedings. This would typically have a review and ...


12

You have asked several important questions. Are Excel-generated plots ever accepted in published manuscripts? Is Excel considered less professional/not serious [at creating plots]? What can other chart making software do better (that excel cannot)? What are some examples of things that can be done to improve the sample plot provided here? In response to ...


29

Azor Ahai's comment about reproducibility is the most important one. I used Excel for many years in a professional but non-academic setting but gave it up when I needed auditable, reproducible results. It is extremely easy to make mistakes when you use Excel and very hard to detect that you have made them. It is effectively impossible to check an Excel ...


6

Yes, your advisor behaviour is unprofessional and certainly against the ethical policies of virtually any serious publisher. I'd contact the other coauthor and write a joint email along the following lines (modify according to your knowledge of the situation): Dear X, We are disappointed by your refusal to share the final versions of the ...


5

I have been on tons of search committees for faculty members, and I would never look at this in a negative light. A submitted manuscript doesn't mean it is substandard work. Conversely, I believe, it means you are an active researcher and have the ability to build a substantial research agenda. I wouldn't worry about this in the least.


4

Unless you are willing to make a formal complaint through the university or the journal, there is probably little you can do. But don't work with this person in the future. That should be obvious. If you are already clear of his influence and ability to sabotage you, then a formal complaint might be worth doing, but more for the benefit of future ...


6

It's pretty hard to imagine that it would be a problem. More is generally better. And the time to publication for a submission can be long. It seems better that you keep working and submitting rather than waiting for one to complete the process. It shows you are active. Always a good thing.


47

Excel can produce high quality charts, but it takes a lot of work. The biggest difference between Excel and other systems is the quality of the defaults. I suspect some people are using excel charts, but they have gone to a lot of effort to tidy them up. In the example chart, you will, for example, definitely need to deal with the x-axis labels overlapping ...


0

First, always be polite to the editor. Often academic editors are volunteers. Even if they are not, being polite is always more helpful than being not polite. Second, journals often have trouble getting enough reviewers. I have emailed journals and asked if they need more reviewer suggestions. This nudges the journal to think about your submission. And, ...


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