New answers tagged

3

First, as I argued in this answer, I suggest you to not use directly the command \texttt but to define a new command reflecting its purpose. About your specific question, a common way is as follows: Don't put parentheses if you are declaring the existence of a certain function or making a reference to it (example from the Matlab documentation): The ...


2

I suspect it's not a matter of being "common practice" -- rather, it's the standard for IEEE and all of its associated conferences and journals (e.g., CVPR). Further, it's a sort of a nice looking formatting with plenty of infrastructure (e.g., .sty files), so it's a common choice when no particular format is prescribed. There are plenty of other journals ...


1

Linguist here. I would rank publications in the following manner: books (reasonable to make plans while a grad student, but might be too ambitious for most PhD students to actually pursue while they're also working on their dissertations) peer-reviewed journal articles, which I think I'd rank almost alongside books if you're publishing in top-tier journals....


3

There are some established standards for page layout in publications. One that I'm familiar with is a set of patterns for desktop (that is, personal) publishing by Andreas Rüping, published in the EuroPloP 1999 proceedings (University of Konstanz). One of the patterns says that a page should be no more than about half text. A fair amount of white space, ...


0

I recommend you name the papers as you say 1.pdf, 2.pdf, and have corresponding metadata files 1.txt, 2.txt which you can structure however you want. Then the crucial part is this: use grep (available for both Linux and Windows) to search through the content of all the text files in that folder. This will find you which txt files contain the searched ...


0

My method is to name each PDF file as: year, authors, title.pdf E.g.: 2020, Abc Def Ghi, The letters of the alphabet.pdf I work with Ubuntu and never had problems with these filenames, although they contain spaces and commas. Putting the year first makes it easy to sort papers by year in the file explorer. Putting the title in the filename makes it ...


0

Social Scientist here. Presenting at a Social Sciences conference rarely counts as publishing a paper, and when it does, you'll know, as you'll have gone through peer review at that point. This usually happens after the conference and results in an edited volume (so, a book) or a journal special issue. "Conference proceedings" are rare in Social Sciences. ...


1

If you read the rules of the journals, you will see that there is actually a generally accepted rule. That rule is: Your submitted journal paper should include at least 25% new material from the conference paper So, you should not simply republish the same paper, rather you should add something to it. The logic goes like this: You have a well thought out ...


9

I manage publications with JabRef in a bibtex database. It is possible to add a link to the filename with JabRef in the bibtex database. A python script pybibtexcleaner transcribes the special characters in the title and moves all sorted files to one folder with file names in the format bibkey-title.pdf The script will generate from a bib entry @Article{...


0

Is there a simple method or perhaps lightweight software that I can use which can help me with this sort of task? Although it is a bit over the top, JabRef can maintain bibliography and rename files: Renaming of files is now part of the “Cleanup Entries” feature (brush button in the toolbar or Ctrl + Shift + F7). Then, you can rename attached files ...


2

How about plain old Excel. Start by naming your PDF documents using a naming scheme like what @gerrit has suggested (or some other mechanism that results in manageable/recognizable file names). Create an Excel worksheet document. Make Column A very wide. Each row will represent a single file Select a cell. Choose the Insert tab and press Link Paste in ...


-3

The most important publication for you as a PHD student is the publication that will award you your title. Normally that is your doctoral thesis although it can also be paper or two. That depends on your university. After you get your PHD title then the most valued publications are papers (in peer reviewed journals) because researchers/academics are ...


6

For books you can use Calibre, which is a free e-book management program. Easy to use.


32

For the filename, I use a system that I plagiarised from my PhD supervisor: aaaadd_xxxx_jjj.pdf where: aaaa: name of the first author (variable length) dd: 2-digit year of publication (fixed length) xxxx: first word of title, minus articles and other small words (variable length) jjj: abbreviation of journal of publication (variable length, but short) I ...


7

I use mendeley with automatic folder scanning. I download a paper with a filename like SI90234023499-II.pdf dump it into one of my watched folders, and it is automatically sorted into ~/Literature/FirstAuthor/Year/Journal/Title.pdf and added to the Mendeley database. You can customise the directory location from any combination of metadata, but for me is ...


16

There is lots of software out there which can help (e.g., Mendeley). I used this (and others) but found it would take more management than I would care to give. Personally, I just had a publications folder with nested sub-folders for different topics. I would then simply name the .pdfs using the last name of the first author and the year of publication, ...


2

This depends on how the editor finds reviewers. Some (most?) editors select reviewers the way you described: from the references, the editor's personal contacts, etc. Others search the system. Editorial Manager allows the authors to select the subfield of their paper, which in turn can be matched to reviewers' interests. An editor who's searching the ...


1

Have patience -- you're asking that many things happen within a short amount of time. Your paper needs to get through an initial administrative check whether the formatting is correct and/or whether there is any plagiarism. Then the editor-in-chief needs to assign the paper to an associate editor. And then the associate editor needs to assign reviewers. Only ...


2

8 days is nothing in academic time. Like the blink of an eye. It is not uncommon for reviews to take months. Just be patient. I know it's hard, but just move on to your next project. If there's no movement in a month or two, then maybe e-mail the editor and ask for a status.


0

You can use the Contributor Roles Taxonomy (or CRediT) approach as a reference to state what was the role of each co-author in your paper. Journals like Plos ONE are adopting this approach or using a modified version. You can read more about this here.


3

I've been looking into this as well. And despite Jan's answer being plenty adequate to your question and extremely informational beyond, I may be able to add this; The first mention of this saying was supposedly by Aristotle, but he said "greater than the sum...". Where Koffka's version is "other than the sum..." I believe the key here is that Koffka's way ...


2

I started applying for jobs because the PhD is not giving me any knowledge at all, just monkey lab work togheter with people who disturb and try to mess around with my very small outcomes. This is called a toxic work environment! It is not specific to research/academia only, but it is a general problem. Unfortunately, it is not good for mental health to ...


1

I think there is no universal answer. There are fields of pure mathematics where single author papers are quite frequent (the majority?) while there are other areas of the sciences (e.g., the biomedical field) that are so broad that nobody has the requisite knowledge and time to do everything themselves. So it depends on the field you're in. But beyond that,...


1

For both sakes, reaching a Habilitation or being attested "Habilitation equivalence" by a hire committee (either one is mandatory to become a full professor in Germany), you need to show that you have moved on. Papers that do not list your PhD supervisor as a coauthor are considered a strong indicator for this. However, this does not mean that you need to ...


1

Metrics to consider are (some already mentioned): Eigenfactor Article Influence Impact Factor 5 year impact factor Source-Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) CiteScore H5 Index


0

This answer should be qualified. Do you have a contract of any kind at the place you are working? Does your work agreement have anything to say about publishing research? You should look carefully at that before submitting any paper. The questions that get asked regarding publication are things like: Is it new, at least in some aspect? Is it interesting? ...


2

It sounds like you are too soft. If you sincerely believe a paper should be rejected, then declining to review it is just withholding useful information from a scientific community that is sorely in need of precisely that information. It is good to question yourself and examine if you have any biases, but at the end of the day, evaluating a scientific work ...


0

I think it is part of Googles business model to keep that information secret. If they specified how the rank is calculated people would try to game the system and it would become less useful.


2

It sometimes happens that I receive referee requests for theoretical papers which deals with the same phenomena I do in my research, but from a totally different specific theoretical starting point...they more often than not seem extremely basic to me. Given that you deal with the same phenomena from a different basis and achieve more advanced results (i.e.,...


2

Let me clarify that published may be a bit ambiguous. When your thesis is accepted and your degree is awarded, it becomes part of the university’s archives. A few decades ago that meant a dusty copy in the university library. Nowadays it’s a publicly available repository that anyone can access. So in that sense, yes: your thesis was made public and has ...


5

To what extent are these 'available online' Master's theses considered to be published? In academia, published typically means included in conference proceedings or a journal by a publisher in some format (typically a printed book) that has an ISBN. A thesis is not published, under that definition. Nonetheless, an unpublished thesis needn't be private, e.g.,...


0

You have a piece of evidence that doesn't tell you very much. But there is a simple way to find out what you need to know. Send a message to the group's PI and express your interest in that area and ask whether they are still doing research in it. Is there any, more recent, work that they can share with you? Are there students in the group with whom you ...


2

I had recently been requested by my PI to help with setting up experiments and getting data for the latter part of a research that was to be submitted as a paper. I spent 3 months aggressively working on it along side my own work towards other projects. ... I had, thereafter, spoken to my PI... Oops --- you have made the rookie mistake of beginning work ...


2

Novelty, importance and relevance The main criteria for publishable research in ML as in pretty much every other field is novelty, importance and relevance. Is your proposed solution or technique novel, and can you demonstrate that? You'd need to provide an overview of relevant literature and alternative solutions, and show how what you're proposing is new ...


3

When these people had their papers published, they agreed to have their names associated with the papers. They took responsibility for the correctness of the papers' content. If the papers are correct, they get rewarded. If the papers are incorrect, they get punished. If they did not want their reputations to be tarnished, then they should not have ...


2

Yes, it is fair. Putting out fraudulent scientific information is contaminating, damaging, and retarding to all the rest of society for an indefinite amount of time into the future. Shaming and banning those who do it is an equitable response. We can do better by making sure that it is widely known that this is the end result. We should all communicate and ...


0

You read research papers. A lot of research papers. By reading these papers, you build up an understanding of the current state-of-the-art in your head, and by doing that, you can begin to understand where the “holes” in the current research are. For instance, you might find a paper that qualitatively describes a phenomenon, but no follow up papers that ...


2

To add to GrotesqueSI's answer, while it might be meaningless to associate an exact number to "hard-working" students, as a lot of other factors matter, I am guessing you are asking this question as a way of setting a goal for yourself (or assessing your work-in-progress). A simple solution might be to pick a sample of 10-20 alumni that you consider to be ...


1

Ten...Thirty...Three hundred... I'll be speaking from the "/humanities" side of your question but I am sure this applies elsewhere. There's no answer to your question, I'm afraid. There is no optimal amount of publications and there is no exact number that would indicate "hard work". Ten low-quality publications in non-peer-reviewed journals or books would ...


16

Scientific papers are usually published in journals and conference proceedings. Publishers report at least the publication year and month, but may also report more information, like the submission date, the revision date and the date of the first online publication. Your example is just a preprint, not the publisher's version, and does not contain any ...


5

The particular paper you linked is a conference paper. Its date of publication will be the date of the conference, which in this case was ESORICS 2012, held September 10-12, 2012. One suspects that what you have linked is a preprint - that is the form of the paper submitted to the publisher before it is published. Computer science is often communicated ...


1

If you have used those preprints to advance your ideas then it would be unethical to try to beat those authors in a race to publication of those ideas. The problem is twofold. The first is just the possibility of a perception that you are acting improperly. This can be a big negative. But the second is that, seeing the other work, you have been already ...


2

I know of four approaches, and to my knowledge, all are commonly used. I'm coming from theoretical chemistry, so not quite theoretical physics, but not so different. Often the data is made public, especially from large collaborations. For example: http://opendata.atlas.cern/ Otherwise, ask the original authors for their data. Often they'll share. ...


0

I would say the general answer to your question is similar in almost every research field. The method to obtain a result is very important and does justify a publication if it is new. One could argue that a new combination of known methods makes a new method. As you stated, your methods were not new, but you applied known methods to a problem they have not ...


4

As you say, applying well-studied tool X to well-studied problem Y and getting the expected result won't lead to a groundbreaking paper. But not every paper is revolutionary, and many such papers are published, particularly in AI. It is true that professors and other senior researchers try to avoid publishing such papers simply because they have limited time ...


2

The TL;DR is that a PIs job security, promotion prospects and grant funding is unfortunately based not on the quality of the research they produce, but on the prestige of the journal they publish it in. To pass probation on my position I needed a publication with Impact factor > 10 within three years of starting. To keep my job I need a so called 4* paper ...


2

My PhD adviser...realized the publication cost was $800 [for Physical Review Letters] and now instead wants to publish in a significantly worse journal...because the publication cost is free. "Physical Review Letters is perfectly OK with publishing their papers for free," source: https://academia.stackexchange.com/a/139304/22768.


7

Note: as pointed out by Pieter Naaijkens, PRL indeed has a publication fee, making most of the original answer incorrect. I've rewritten the answer as a result. When one pays a publication fee that isn't open access, one is effectively paying the publisher to distribute the paper. Most (subscription) publishers and journals are quite content to distribute ...


1

Can I phrase this another way? If your journal article could be listed on Bing for free, but Google for $1k, would you pay for Google? I think a lot of people would. In general, whether reputation for the journal (Nature is such a great journal!) or the journal is well known (yes, of course I've heard of Science!), readership is important. People pay ...


3

Assuming that I understand it now, I do have a suggestion. Given the norms in your field, in which the PI is (I think) a co-author of every paper and who controls the grant and the research, you can't really distinguish yourself without help. But if others speak to your qualities more than you do, it might be enough - or even better. That would be the case ...


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