We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

New answers tagged

0

Argentina. I did my BA for free there. And my MA almost for free.


2

For any reasonable understanding of the terms, French public Universities are open admission and free. To give a bit more details, one is allowed to enroll in a university provided one has a high-school degree. At the moment, about 80% of high-school students eventually succeed at getting the required high-school degree. Even without such a degree, there ...


10

I can mention the case of Argentina. All public universities are free, with open admission since the early 1980s. Anyone with a high school diploma (and there's no comprehensive final exam, or qualifying exam, etc. after high school) that applies gets in, including foreigners that have residency (which is super-easy to get). There is a limited possibility ...


1

Not sure if something hasn't changed in the last years, but it has been like that in Latvia since 1991(regain of independence): There is a (fairly large) number of state sponsored slots in 2-4 major state universities. To qualify for those slots, you have to be above the threshold in entrance exam results. The threshold depends on the number of ...


1

I'm going to offer an answer, partly from the U.S. perspective, highlighting information gathered in the comments, chat, and other answers. In both Europe and at U.S. lower-level (community) colleges, entry to the college usually requires a high school diploma and no other qualifications. However, the "quality control" that I would expect for the European ...


4

California isn't a country, but our community college system does have open admissions as well as being in effect free. It's free in the sense that all students receive at least an ~80% subsidy, and most are 100% subsidized. There are various programs that allow students to completely get free tuition. There is a need-based program that something like half ...


14

I have taught at both at two Swedish universities and one American university (Ivy League). The main difference is really the philosophy - in the US, it is difficult to get in, but once admitted, it is not that hard to stay with passing grades. In Sweden, getting admitted is relatively easy (which implies a much more diverse body of students), but the ...


3

Scotland has free undergraduate full-time degrees, and the part-time distance-learning Open University has no entry requirements for most of its degrees (access courses are available for those who haven't studied up to age 18). And as far as I'm aware there are no limits on student numbers. http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/do-it/ready-for-success Scottish ...


29

Well, it depends how strict you are with the terms "open" and "free": Open: Most European countries I am familiar with (Austria, Germany, Sweden, Switzerland) are actually fairly open in terms of admission. There are always some basic requirements (e.g., candidates need to have a high school diploma or comparable), and sometimes there are entry ...


43

Here is an overview of the situation in Germany, where there are no tuition fees for Bachelor and Master programs at public universities (though student union fees and public transport fees totaling 60-130 EUR per semester still apply). For Bachelor degrees, the general requirements for admission to any German university are (1) proof of knowledge of the ...


1

For both sakes, reaching a Habilitation or being attested "Habilitation equivalence" by a hire committee (either one is mandatory to become a full professor in Germany), you need to show that you have moved on. Papers that do not list your PhD supervisor as a coauthor are considered a strong indicator for this. However, this does not mean that you need to ...


1

In Australia, usually PhD students start when they receive their visa. This has no relation to the academic calendar or the student's wishes. Domestic PhD students often start around February. PhD students do not have cohorts in Australia.


1

In the UK, most PhD studentships for home (UK/EU) will be advertised in the autumn, and also those few places that have PhD programms will have closing dates just after Christmas. In most cases this will be to recruit to programs that will start in the autumn of the following year. This is not a hard and fast rule, and plenty of people will get positions ...


3

Assuming that I understand it now, I do have a suggestion. Given the norms in your field, in which the PI is (I think) a co-author of every paper and who controls the grant and the research, you can't really distinguish yourself without help. But if others speak to your qualities more than you do, it might be enough - or even better. That would be the case ...


0

This will be UK specific and life sciences specific. The fact that you will generally be applying to an individual rather than a program in the UK means that you have the chance to appeal directly to the supervisor in question. We (just about) understand what a GPA is, and so your poor GPA will be noted, but it is unlikely absolutely rule you out. The fact ...


6

There are a number of relevant differences between North American and European PhD programs. First, it is key to note that practices differ greatly from country to country. The following answer will focus on general trends across Europe, but be aware that there will be exceptions. One big difference is that in Europe you generally would not be applying to a ...


0

European PhDs are shorter? From what I heard, here (in Germany), you take about 3 years if you can get governmental funding and work on your thesis full time. If you need to do lab/project work to fund your PhD, you are looking at something like 5-6 years. On top of that you get at least two years to do your Masters, as here it is Bachelors --> Masters --> ...


0

I know very little about the French system, but am surprised you could not find anything online. I did a little poking and found what seems like the answer; perhaps you or other users can correct me if this is overly simplistic. From FrenchDistrict.com: [Si] Vous avez obtenu un diplôme aux Etats-Unis, et vous désirez rentrer au pays (France), dans ce cas ...


Top 50 recent answers are included